Quality Assurance Auditing for FDA-regulated industries

Quality Assurance Auditing for FDA-regulated industries5

An effective audit constitutes the heart of an effective Quality System. The FDA and other regulatory agencies have emphasized this principle time and again. The purpose of an audit program is to ensure proper and thorough compliance with the guidelines set out by the regulatory agencies. A Quality Assurance audit should also ensure that the activities the company that is being audited is carrying out are within the legal guidelines and frameworks laid out by the respective regulatory authorities.

Two types of audits

Quality Assurance Auditing for FDA-regulated industries3

An organization that is in an FDA-regulated industry is required to carry out internal and external audits. The purpose of this dual type of audit is that one complements the other and the two together reinforce the audits. As the two terms indicate, an internal audit may be thought of as being a tool for self-examination. It is an audit that the organization’s own employees carry out to scrutinize the usefulness of the systems. An external audit, on the other hand, is one that is performed by an independent person who has the qualification and purpose for this kind of work. The purpose of both these types of audits is the same.

Audits based on process

Quality Assurance Auditing for FDA-regulated industries1

The core principle on which audits for the FDA-regulated industries are carried out as part of a Quality System is that since testing alone is not sufficient to ensure quality; quality should be inbuilt into the product. This approach, called the process based to auditing; has to, naturally, be based on an in-depth understanding of the entire set of processes that go into a Quality System before the commencement of the audit. A complete understanding of the processes relating to the business, control and production on the part of the auditors should be the basis to the process-based audit. Auditors then go about defining the criteria for the audit and the scope of the purpose they expect it to serve.

So, what to audit?

Quality Assurance Auditing for FDA-regulated industries

Since Quality Assurance auditing is generic to any FDA-regulated industry; a definition of what has to be audited is quite expansive. Based on the kind of the business, these are the important areas in which audit is carried out:

  • Product
  • Process
  • Quality System
  • Regulatory
  • Supplier
  • System
  • Management

The four phases of auditing

Four self-explanatory phases go into an auditing process:

  • The preparation stage
  • The performance stage
  • The Reporting stage
  • The follow-up and closure stage

Auditing of management systems

The ISO 19011

The ISO 19011

The ISO introduced the ISO 19011 management systems audit. The ISO makes it mandatory for companies to also audit the management systems along with Quality Systems. This is done to ensure completeness of the audit.

Passed in 2011, the ISO 19011 is the guiding principle for auditing a company’s management systems and the ISO standard for auditing a company’s management systems.

Full understanding of all elements of audits

A detailed explanation of the ISO 19011 and all other aspects of an ISO audit will be given at a two-day seminar that is being organized by GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for the areas of regulatory compliance.

At this seminar, David Dills, Global Regulatory Affairs & Compliance Consultant who provides regulatory affairs and compliance consultative services for early-stage and established Class I/II/III device, IVD, biopharmaceutical, cosmetics and nutraceutical manufacturers on the global landscape, and has an accomplished record with more than 27 years of experience in the areas of Regulatory Affairs, Compliance and Quality Systems; will be the Director.

Please log on to Quality Assurance Auditing for FDA-regulated industries to enroll for this seminar. This webinar has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

Benefits of participation at this seminar

Participants who attend this seminar will benefit in a myriad of ways. David will offer the following at this seminar:

  • Clear Understanding of Auditing Fundamentals
  • Understand Audit Preparation and Planning
  • Learn best techniques for Audit Performance
  • Learn best practices for Audit Reporting
  • How to address Audit Follow-up and Closure efficiently and effectively
  • Understand the requirements and expectations for being an effective auditor
  • How to develop into an even better auditor
  • How to structure, plan and manage your audits
  • How to develop your technical and non-technical skills
  • How to perform your best audit ever.

He will cover the following areas at this seminar:

 

 

 

Quality by Design using Design of Experiments 2017

The Q8, which is the ICH guidance document on pharmaceutical development, requires a drug product to meet its intended product performance as well as the needs of patients. A drug product is encouraged to adapt a systematic approach for pharmaceutical development in accordance with the steps defined by Quality by Design (QbD) principles, even though the strategy may vary from company to company or from product to product.

The ICH has offered further guidance and policies for explaining the ways by which the QbD approach should be integrated into the pharmaceutical Quality System. Some of these are:

o  Process design

o  Qualification

o  Continued process verification

o  Risk management

o  Validation.

Laxity in implementation is no longer an option

Despite the issuance of guidance on implementation of these requirements; many companies have not yet implemented QbD into their Quality Systems. This will change soon, though. Regulatory agencies have been taking a serious view of non-implementation of these requirements.

The ways in which reviewers will begin to enforce the requirements from these guidance documents have been spelt out in the manual the Chemistry, Manufacturing, and Controls (CMC) reviewers in the Office of Pharmaceutical Science (OPS) released on policies and procedures (MAPP).

The zeal with which the regulatory agencies will enforce compliance with the requirements of the QbD requirements has been emphasized also by the Director of the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) at the FDA, who detailed the concept and reiterated the importance of using a QbD approach to pharmaceutical development in a paper he co-authored in The American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists in May 2014.

Understand the ways of implementing QbD

In the light of the fact that a drug product can no longer afford to relax in its adherence to steps defined by Quality by Design (QbD) principles to adapting a systematic approach for pharmaceutical development; a meaningful and educative two-day seminar from GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for the areas of regulatory compliance, will show the ways of doing this.

At this seminar, Heath Rushing, who is the cofounder of Adsurgo LLC and co-author of the book Design and Analysis of Experiments by Douglas Montgomery: A Supplement for using JMP, will be the Director. To gain complete insight into how to implement QbD, please register for this seminar by visiting Quality by Design using Design of Experiments. This seminar has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

Complete learning on QbD using DoE

The core purpose of this session is to demonstrate how to integrate those QbD principles into a pharmaceutical Quality System. Towards this end, Heath will focus on how to establish a systematic approach to pharmaceutical development that is defined by Quality-by-Design (QbD) principles using Design of Experiments (DoE).

He will also take up the application of statistics for setting specifications, assessing measurement systems (assays), developing a control plan as part of a risk management strategy, and ensuring process control/capability for detailed description. All concepts are taught within the product Quality System framework defined by requirements in regulatory guidance documents.

A systematic understanding of the process

A QbD approach for pharmaceutical development studies should include a systematic understanding of the process. It should then use this understanding to establish a control strategy as part of a comprehensive quality risk management program. This systematic understanding should include both identification of significant process parameters and determination of a functional relationship (mathematical model) linking these significant process parameters to the critical Quality Attributes (CQAs). Heath will discuss these in depth.

Despite the thrust of this seminar on the use of DoE for QbD; it will integrate multiple aspects of QbD. An understanding of the relevant applied statistics will be offered, which will help participants understand how statistics can be used to help in two foundational requirements of QbD: A) Setting specifications, and B) Analyzing measurement systems.

Important tools for facilitating understanding

This seminar will also offer tools to participants, which will help them to derive value out of their designed experiments. Generating and analyzing both screening and response surface designs for QbD studies, the ways of using this information: best practices on presentation, setting control plans, constructing control charts, and evaluating process capability are among the other constituents of this course. This course uses the point-and-click interface of JMP software for analyses.

Heath will cover the following areas at this seminar:

o  Implement QbD principles from discovery through product discontinuation

o  Apply statistics to set specifications and validate measurement systems (assays)

o  Utilize risk management tools to identify and prioritize potential Critical Process Parameters

o  Identify Critical Process Parameters and develop a functional relationship between those process parameters and your Critical-to-Quality Attributes (CQAs)

o  Establish your design space

o  Develop a control plan as part of a risk management strategy

o  Ensure your process is in (statistical) control and capable.