Cleaning and Sanitation Training for Food Processors

We will cover several topics of value to food manufacturing sanitation team members. We will begin with a conceptual understanding of cleaning vs. sanitation.

We will then review proper cleaning techniques to ensure microbial and allergen residue removal. Attendees will learn about the chemicals used in industrial cleaning and sanitation and how to protect themselves against harmful exposure and accidents.

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Why should you attend: The industry has come a long way since the turn of the century, when the poor sanitation practices of many food manufacturing facilities was exposed. Recent events have highlighted the need for even better sanitation. The population has become decidedly more vulnerable and exposed to food borne illnesses linked to manufacturers.

The FDA cited Sunland Inc, the firm that manufactured various nut products recalled this year, for numerous sanitation violations. Failure to properly clean equipment and subsequent salmonella contamination of product resulted in a very poor outcome for this facility. Poor sanitation can also result in allergen cross contamination. Understanding where there are “dead ends” in product flow and difficult to clean areas is important for sanitation personnel to be aware of. What types of cleaning chemicals remove the various types of soils unique to each industry is also critical for an effective sanitation program. Very basic sanitation concepts and practices can make a big difference.

Course Modules & Content Details:

  • Cleaning and Sanitation practices specific to various areas of the manufacturing environment and the resultant risks
  • Types of soils and cleaning chemicals based on the properties of each
  • Results of exposure to hazardous chemicals, how to read labels and maintain chemical safety.

Areas Covered in the Session:

  • Scope of Cleaning and Sanitation
  • Sanitation Regulations and Best Practices
  • Cleaning
  • Chemical Safety
  • Review
  • Closing
  • Self Assessment

Who Will Benefit:

  • Food Manufacturing employees at all levels, especially sanitation and operations/production team members
  • Auditors who review facilities quality assurance programs
  • Customers who want to understand best practices that they should require of their suppliers will benefit
Speaker Profile
Melinda Allen is a Food Safety and Quality Consultant in the Food Industry. Melinda has had a long and dedicated career of Quality Assurance and Food Safety leadership with companies such as YUM Brands and Quiznos. Her consulting clients have included leaders in the field such as Burger King, Panda Express and Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen. She continues to work with many of these and additional clients. Melinda and her team of experienced professionals are available for Quality Assurance and Food Service auditing, Specification and Program Development and Training, Product Commercialization.

GSK therapy for multiple myeloma receives breakthrough therapy designation

The use of Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation

Why you Should be Worried about HIPAAThe use of Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation is considered a matter of very high importance in the pharmaceutical industry. The FDA’s guidance for the industry, which it called “Process Validation: General Principles and Practices”, was set up in 2011. This guideline sets the framework for Process Validation in the pharmaceutical industry. The FDA prescribes a three-stage process that any organization in the pharmaceutical industry has to set up:

  1. Process Design
  2. Process Qualification
  • Continued Process Verification.

The Process Design stage, which is called Stage 1, is when the organization defines the commercial manufacturing process. The knowledge that the organization has gained through development and scale-up activities serves as the basis for the development of this definition.

The Process Qualification, or Stage 2, involves evaluating the process design for the purpose of determining if the process defined in Stage I has the capability for reproducible commercial manufacturing.

The next stage of the FDA process validation stage is to determine if the Process Design stage and the Process Qualification stage give the ongoing assurance that the process remains in a state of control during routine production. This is what Stage 3, the Continued Process Verification, does.

Thorough understanding of how to implement Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation

GMPs for Combination Products and 505(b)(2) Products

The ways of using Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation will be the topic of a two-day seminar that GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for the regulatory compliance areas, will be organizing. At this seminar, Richard Burdick, Emeritus Professor of Statistics, Arizona State University (ASU) and former Quality Engineering Director for Amgen, Inc., will be the Director.

Please visit http://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/control/globalseminars/~product_id=901132SEMINAR?wordpress-SEO to register for this meaningful and highly valuable seminar on applied statistics for process validation. This course has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

A methodical approach to implementing statistical methodologies

Top 20 Costly Mistakes

The focus of this two-day course on Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation is the various ways by which a systematic approach to implementing statistical methodologies into a process validation program consistent with the FDA guidance can be established.

Dr. Burdick will begin with a primer on statistics, where he will explain how the methods of Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation seminar can be applied in each remaining chapter.

The two fundamental requirements for Process Validation, namely the application of statistics for setting specifications and assessing measurement systems (assays), will be taken up next.

The next aspect of applied statistics Dr. Burdick will move on to is how to apply statistics through the three stages of process validation as defined by requirements in the process validation regulatory guidance documents.

Since the methods taught through all these three stages are recommended by regulatory guidance documents; this seminar on Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation will provide references to the specific citations in the guidance documents.

The aim of this learning on Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation is to lead participants into ways of establishing a systematic approach to implementing statistical methodologies into a process development and validation program that is consistent with the FDA guidance.

Complete learning on Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation

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Over the two days of this seminar, the participants will learn how to:

  • Apply statistics for setting specifications
  • Assess measurement systems (assays)
  • Use Design of Experiments (DOE)
  • Develop a control plan as part of a risk management strategy, and
  • Ensure process control/capability.

All concepts at this Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation seminar are taught within the three-stage product cycle framework defined by requirements in the process validation regulatory guidance documents.

Although aimed at the pharmaceutical industry, this seminar on Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation provides a useful framework for other related industries, as well.

In this important learning on Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation; Dr. Burdick will cover the following areas:

  • Apply statistics to set specifications and validate measurement systems (assays)
  • Develop appropriate sample plans based on confidence and power
  • Implement suitable statistical methods into a process validation program for each of the three stages
  • Stage 1, Process Design: utilize risk management tools to identify and prioritize potential critical process parameters; and define critical process parameters and operating spaces for the commercial manufacturing process using design of experiments (DOE)
  • Stage 2, Process Qualification: assess scale effects while incorporating large (pilot and/or commercial) scale data; develop process performance qualification (PPQ) acceptance criteria by characterizing intra and inter-batch variability using process design data and batch homogeneity studies; and develop an appropriate sampling plan for PPQ
  • Stage 3, Continued Process Verification: develop a control plan as part of a risk management strategy; collect and analyze product and process data; and ensure your process is in (statistical) control and capable.

keep enhancing FDA Process Validation

6 Ways To Start Improving Your Gut Health Today

Brooke Lark / Unsplash

Considering the rapid rise in kombucha, sauerkraut and probiotic products, it’s pretty clear gut health is on everyone’s minds. And with good reason — more and more research is emerging showing just how important good gut health is for overall wellbeing.

“Having a healthy gut is so important,” accredited practising dietitian and sports dietitian Chloe McLeod told HuffPost Australia.

“It’s linked to a number of different medical conditions. When your gut isn’t healthy it can have an impact on mental health, weight, mood and a number of other digestive disorders. Keeping your gut nice and healthy can help keep the rest of your body healthy.”

Brooke Lark / Unsplash

How do you know if you have good gut health?

“Signs of good gut health include not getting bloating, gas, diarrhoea and constipation,” McLeod said.

“You find you feel better in general — better mood, more energy, a healthy weight and not feeling fatigued. These are all more pronounced when your gut is healthier.”

How do you know if you have bad gut health?

“If you have poor gut health you may have loose, unformed stools, or you’re really constipated, maybe your faeces are foul smelling, you feel gassy, feel foggy headed or have poor mood. These are some of the most common signs,” McLeod explained.

What can negatively affect gut health?

There are a number of diet and lifestyle-related factors which can impact the health of your gut.

“From a nutrition perspective, factors that negatively impact gut health include poor diet, alcohol and having a high fat intake,” McLeod said.

“Also, if you are someone with food intolerances, any large quantity of those trigger foods can have a negative effect on your gut health.

“Being highly stressed all the time impacts cortisol levels, and stress can be a factor for some people. Some medications can also affect gut health.”

 

Read More: http://snip.ly/r70uc#http://www.huffingtonpost.com.au/2017/09/24/6-ways-to-start-improving-your-gut-health-today_a_23218661/

Article on “A Tour of the FDA”

A tour of the FDA is something like a snapshot of what the FDA does. The importance of the FDA can never be understated: It regulates products from the proverbial pin to airplane in the food, medical devices, pharma and healthcare industries, which touch almost every aspect of American lives. The products that the FDA regulates account for about a trillion dollars, which make up about a quarter of all goods traded in the US.

So, what is a tour of the FDA like?

A tour of the FDA helps to get a broad understanding of the this regulatory body and get some idea of the various departments it has, as well as the functions of these departments. To get an understanding of what the FDA does, a reference to its mission statement could give some direction:

“(The) FDA is responsible for protecting the public health by assuring the safety, efficacy and security of human and veterinary drugs, biological products, medical devices, our nation’s food supply, cosmetics, and products that emit radiation.” This is just the opening line of the FDA’s mission statement. Reference to its other statements, which have now included a reference to containing terrorism, will serve as a good guide to a tour of the FDA. In short, the FDA regulates nearly every item used and consumed by the American public.

The history of the FDA

The legal sanction for carrying out its mission is mandated by the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act). An amazing fact that a tour of the FDA reveals is that it is one of the oldest regulatory bodies in the world, with its earliest jurisdiction having covered regulation of drugs in the year 1848. The Department of Agriculture, to which President James Polk appointed noted chemist Charles Wetherill, can be considered the earliest endeavor to regulate medical products of daily use in the US.

How is the FDA organized?

A tour of the FDA is incomplete without a reference to the way it is organized. Its structure consists of this hierarchy:

  • Office of the Commissioner
  • Office of Foods and Veterinary Medicine
  • Office of Global Regulatory Operations and Policy
  • Office of Medical Products and Tobacco
  • Office of Operations

Under these broad heads, a tour of the FDA shows the way into which it is divided into several offices and organizations. Important among these include:

  • Office of Regulatory Affairs (ORA)
  • Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN)
  • Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER)
  • Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)
  • Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH)
  • Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH)
  • National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR)

Want to know more: Article on “A Tour of the FDA”

Implementing the 510 (K) correctly in compliance with the latest proposed FDA changes

A 510(K) is a premarket submission made to FDA to demonstrate that a device to be marketed is at least as safe and effective, meaning that which is substantially equivalent, to a legally marketed device that is not subject to premarket approval (PMA).

fda-round

There are three types of Premarket Notification 510(K)’s that may be submitted to FDA: Traditional, Special, and Abbreviated. Product modifications that could significantly affect safety and effectiveness are subject to 510(K) submission requirements under 21 CFR 807 as well as design control requirements under the Quality System (QS) regulation. Under the QS regulation, all Class II and III devices and certain Class I devices are required to be designed in conformance with 21 CFR 820.30 Design Controls. The FDA provides guidance on these.

Needed: A thorough understanding of these aspects and the FDA’s latest proposed changes

In accordance with the concern evinced by many industry groups and associations, the FDA introduced as many as 60 proposals in August 2010, into the manner in which the 510 (K) process could be expedited. This was done with the intention of accelerating the speed at which newly approved medical devices could be made available to patients across the country. However, with the number of proposals being too many and their scope being too wide; the medical industry suggested that the FDA select for implementation only those proposals that enjoyed the broad consensus of the stakeholders, such as increased reviewer training, development of specific and relevant guidance documents, and enhancements or improvements to the de novo review pathway, among other suggestions.

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An upcoming seminar by GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for the regulatory compliance industries, will clarify on these areas taken up for immediate change by the FDA and place them in the right context. It will address key resources when making critical decisions. This seminar will offer important insights into the core areas of premarket notifications, as well as the Design Control requirements under QS regulations and Design Controls.

To enroll for this seminar, just log on to http://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/control/globalseminars/~product_id=900527SEMINAR.

The Director at this seminar is David R. Dills, a senior Regulatory Affairs & Compliance Consultant. David provides regulatory, compliance and quality consultative services for medical device and pharmaceutical/combination manufacturers, and also has an accomplished record with more than 24 years of experience with Class I/II/III medical devices, In Vitro diagnostics, and pharmaceuticals in the areas of Regulatory Affairs, Compliance and Quality Systems.

An understanding of the core elements of the PMA

At this seminar, David will help participants understand how medical device manufacturers can locate a “predicate” device and go through the content and format of the 510(K), and offer an understanding of the De Novo process and the expectations for possibly marketing a low risk device, and the potential impact of FDA’s proposed changes to the 510(K) process and why manufacturers need to pay attention to these.

He will also offer understanding of all the crucial aspects of the PMA, such as the differences between the Traditional, Special and Abbreviated submissions, an understanding of the Substantial Equivalence and how it is applied, who is required to submit the application to FDA, where to submit the 510(K) and what to expect with the review and approval process, when a device company requires this process and when it does not, the applicable exemptions to the submission process and special considerations, and so on.

Making sense of the FDA’s GMP and Regulatory Expectations for Early IND Products

The FDA’s recent guidance documents covering GMP requirements for Phase I products have considerably reduced some of the complexities early phase products face. These guidance documents are in addition to those that cover the CMC sections for IND submissions at Phase I.

Although these new guidelines appear to remove the need to follow GMPs for Phase I products; the same still exists in the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. As a result, the need for GMP requirements for Phase I products has not been done away with; rather, it has been altered. Now, the nature and extent of GMP-related activities will depend upon the nature of the investigational drug and the extent of the study that is planned.

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Get trained to understand these aspects

GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for the areas of regulatory compliance, will be organizing a two-day seminar to help Directors, Managers and Supervisors in Regulatory Affairs, Quality Assurance and Quality Control get a grasp of these aspects. To enroll for this highly valuable training, please log on to http://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/control/globalseminars/~product_id=900695SEMINAR?GMP-regulatory-expectations-San-Diego. Steven S. Kuwahara, Founder and Principal, GXP BioTechnology LLC, will be the Director of this webinar.

Advice on the GMP guidance document

This presentation, which has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion, will review the GMP guidance document and discuss how it may be integrated with the recommendations of the guidance documents on CMC requirements. In one source, it will present the regulations and guidelines that apply to early phase products. In some cases these may not be regulations, but needs that, if met, will increase the efficiency of activities as a product proceeds through the development process. Steven will present these items in the order of product development from the point of R & D activities to the completion of Phase 2 clinical trials.

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This course is very useful for any pharmaceutical personnel who must deal with products both in early and later phases of development, as it will make them aware of the regulatory requirements that will affect operations dealing with these products. The modifications to the GMPs for early phase products have altered the GMPs in such a way as to reduce requirements to allow more efficient work. At the same time, some of the things that may appear to have changed, have not, and personnel in the pharmaceutical sector should be aware of this. This is the learning that Steven will emphasize at this seminar.

It will cover the following areas:

  • Very Early Stages
  • GLP requirements
  • Early Pre-IND Studies
  • Meetings and Preparing for the IND
  • GMPs for Phase 1 IND products
  • Requirements for Phase 2 INDs
  • Preparing for IND Meetings