Article on Effective techniques for extracting information from geochemical data are largely ignored by the industry

In the area of geochemical data analysis techniques and obtaining geochemical extracting information; most mining specialists strongly recommend an approach that goes beyond merely asking the laboratory for geochemical extracting information of a gold test by sampling every meter of the drill core of a trench and using multielement analysis. There, however, exist other methods of geochemical data analysis techniques and obtaining geochemical extracting information. But these are largely ignored by the industry.

As a result of following only one method and technique for geochemical data analysis and obtaining geochemical extracting information, an average geologist is not generally well trained on the necessary techniques and methods. Whenever a request for such data mining techniques analyses comes up, the geologist is short of the techniques and methods needed for geochemical extracting information, including the use of compositional data analysis. This results in failure in the endeavor of extracting all the geochemical data analysis information contained in the data.

Insight into how to use geochemical data analysis techniques and obtaining geochemical extracting information

Noting the deficiency in the methods used for optimal geochemical data analysis techniques and obtaining geochemical extracting information; GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for the areas of regulatory compliance, is organizing a two-day learning session that inculcates the right learning in this area.

At this seminar, Ricardo Valls, a professional geologist with thirty years in the mining industry, will be the Director. He brings the vast wealth of experience of the extensive geological, geochemical, and mining experience, managerial skills, research techniques, and training he has gained by carrying out various projects globally, into this seminar. To benefit from this seminar, please register for it by visiting http://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/control/globalseminars/~product_id=900828?linkedin-SEO . This course has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

Simplifying the geochemical extracting information to make sense

Geologists, Geochemists, Exploration personnel, Graduate students and Postgraduate students will find this course very useful, as it will give them an understanding of how to simplify and make sense of the geochemical extracting information. The speaker will demonstrate all types of analyses that can be requested. This will help participants in their exploration goal of finding the new ore body.

This seminar will help mining professionals understand how to extract all the important information of their data, including the use of compositional data analysis.

Valls will cover the following areas at this seminar on obtaining geochemical extracting information:

–       How to determine the type of sampling

–       How to determine the type of assays

–       General processing of the data

–       Compositional Data Analysis

–       Representing the results

In the process of explaining the ways of obtaining geochemical extracting information; Valls will set the following agenda for this seminar:

How to determine the type of sampling

·                    Mechanical anomalies

·                    Chemical anomalies

·                    Chemo-mechanical anomalies

·                    Scale of work

How to determine the type of assays

·                    What are you looking for?

·                    What the laboratory can offer?

QA&QC in the field and in the laboratory

·                    QA&QC in the field

·                    QA&QC in the laboratory

General processing of the data

·                    Preparing the data

·                    The problem of zeros and b.d.l. data

·                    Hurricane values

·                    Distribution law

·                    Preparing the data for further analysis.

Compositional Data Analysis

·                    Brief introduction

·                    Comparing CDa with normal statistics

·                    ALR

·                    CLR

·                    ILR

Processing major elements

·                    Statistical processing

·                    Determining the most probable magmatic event.

Processing trace elements

·                    Statistical processing

·                    Estimating the erosional level

·                    Determining geochemical indexes

Graphical representation of the results

·                    Variograms

·                    SURFER

What Would Happen to Health Spending Under ACA?

The growth in health care spending is expected to have slowed in 2016 and to remain slow in 2017, due to slower enrollment in government-sponsored Medicaid and a reduction in spending on prescription drugs, according to a report released Wednesday by actuaries from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

The report, published in the journal Health Affairs, assumes that President Barack Obama’s health care law, the Affordable Care Act, is still in place. Every year, the Office of the Actuary in the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services releases an analysis about how Americans are expected to spend money on health care in the years ahead. The agency will release the final outcomes on 2016 spending at the end of this year, once all the amounts have been tabulated.


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Michelle Loose, a University of Denver accelerated nursing student, checks the blood pressure for patient Elife Bzuneh, during a medical clinic night at the DAWN clinic on August 9, 2016, in Aurora, Colorado.

Priced Out of Coverage


The effects of the Affordable Care Act are expected to dwindle in coming years. The report finds that if the law were to continue as is then the share of the insured population would increase from 90.9 percent in 2015 to 91.5 by 2025, as more people become employed in jobs that provide them with coverage.

The slowing of health spending growth by 1.1 percent to 4.8 percent in 2016 is expected to be short-lived as the U.S. population ages, with baby boomers going onto Medicare and likely needing to use more care. Because of these factors, beginning in 2018 both Medicare and Medicaid are projected to grow faster than private insurance spending as income growth slows.

“Irrespective of any changes in law, it is expected that because of continued cost pressures associated with paying for health care, employers, insurers and other payers will continue to pursue strategies that seek to effectively manage the use and cost of health care goods and services,” Sean Keehan, the study’s first author, said in a statement.

During a press conference in Washington hosted by Health Affairs, Keehan said that “high cost-sharing is certainly one of the important factors” in driving down how much people with private plans use care, given that they have to consider how much they will shoulder costs themselves in the form of out-of-pocket spending and deductibles.

By 2025, actuaries forecast that health care’s share of the economy will reach 19.9 percent, an increase from 17.8 percent in 2025.

According to authors of the Health Affairs article, “medical price growth is projected to quicken in the coming decade compared to recent history, as both overall prices and medical-specific price inflation grow faster.”

In 2014 and 2015, health care spending had accelerated because the Affordable Care Act’s provisions went into effect: Coverage was expanded to more people and more people used health care. The federal government also chipped in more to help people pay for premiums and to pay for Medicaid for low-income Americans. Prescription drug costs also are expected to slow. In 2014 and 2015, spending surged as the drugs that were approved to treat hepatitis C, a liver disease that can require a transplant if it turns into a chronic infection, hit the market.


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Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price, center, accompanied by his wife Betty, and Vice President Mike Pence, signs an official document during a swearing in ceremony, Friday, Feb. 10, 2017, in the in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House complex in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

HHS Proposes Obamacare Rule


By 2016, these effects had slowed. Devin Stone, an economist in for CMS Office of the Actuary, said at the press conference that the projections assume that more drugs will lose their patents, slowing prescription drug costs as more generics become available.

Authors of the projections were forthcoming about the fact that the numbers are likely off target given that future of the Affordable Care Act is mired in uncertainty. Republicans and President Donald Trump have vowed to repeal the law, but lawmakers haven’t yet agreed on the timeline or ways to replace it. Decisions from lawmakers on both sides could alter factors around health spending but could also increase the number of uninsured, despite pledges or efforts not to.

Alan Weil, executive editor for Health Affairs, said the projections were still useful to help inform policy, particularly when it comes to designing ways to respond to the parts of the health care system that are driving price increases.

“This is a baseline and it’s still the law, so knowing where we are going is still important,” he said. “It’s also an important baseline to compare changes to the law. Whether we stick to the law or not, it’s important to know where we would have been.”

 

http://www.usnews.com/news/health-care-news/articles/2017-02-15/without-changes-to-obamacare-heres-what-happens-to-health-care-spending

The Design History File (DHF), the Technical File (TF) and the Design Dossier (DD)

The Design History File (DHF), the Technical File (TF) and the Design Dossier (DD) are core regulatory documents for a medical device. This is how one can understand the central difference between them: the Design History File (along with Design Control), is the most important among the regulatory documents that the FDA requires for medical devices, while the Technical File and Design Dossier are documents that serve the same purpose, however, within the EU’s regulatory body, the Medical Device Directive (MDD). These documents constitute core regulatory requirements within these regulatory bodies.

The DHF on the one hand, and the TF and the Design Dossier on the other, have a lot of similarities as well as dissimilarities with each other. At a basic level, the major similarity between them is their intended purpose, while what they should contain is the main difference between the two.

If US medical device companies seeking to go global have to compete at a global level, they must meet an assortment of product design documentation standards. The Design Control and the Design History File (DHF) are mandated by the FDA’s CGMPs in 21 CFR 820.30, while for the EU; the core requirement is its CE-marking documentation –the Technical File or Design Dossier, as described in the MDD.

A thorough understanding of Design History File, the Technical File and the Design Dossier is necessary

All the complexities and in-depth clarification relating to these subtle matters about medical device regulatory requirements will be unraveled at a two-day seminar that is being organized by GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for the areas of regulatory compliance. John E Lincoln, who is Principal of J. E. Lincoln and Associates LLC, a consulting company and a senior Consultant in the Medical device and Regulatory Affairs areas, will be the Director at this seminar.

This seminar has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion. To register for this seminar, please log on to http://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/control/globalseminars/~product_id=900746?linkedin-SEO .

Complete knowledge of Design History File, the Technical File and the Design Dossier

At this seminar, Lincoln will examine the existing and proposed requirements for the FDA’s DHF, which includes a discussion of its derivative documents, the DMR and DHR. He will explain what the European Union’s MDD TF/DD requirements are, along with an evaluation of the documents’ differing purposes and goals, their similarities, as well as the two different device classification schemes. All important aspects relating to these areas will be taken up.

These are some of the topics Lincoln will take up for discussion:

o  Areas requiring frequent re-evaluation or update

o  Similarities and differences

o  Future trends

o  Typical DHF Table of Contents

o  Technical File or Design Dossier Table of Contents

o  The importance and usefulness of the “Essential Requirements”

o  Structure of the “Declaration of Conformity”

o  Self-declaring or Notified-Body reviewed

o  Parallel approaches to development

o  The differing approaches to file audits by the U.S. FDA and the EU Notified Body.

Useful session for companies that need to handle Design History File, the Technical File and the Design Dossier

Being a seminar aimed at helping participants understand US and global standards for medical devices; it will offer valuable assistance to all regulated companies that need to implement, review and/or modify their Device History Files, Device Master Records, Device History Records, Technical Files or Design Dossiers, documents, and activities/plan(s).

During the course of these two days, Lincoln will cover the following areas:

o  The Design Control requirements of the CGMPs, 21 CFR 820.30

o  The Design History File – documenting Product Design Control and its nine elements

o  The Device Master Record and the Device History Record

o  The EU’s Medical Device Directive

o  The “Essential Requirements”; and their documentation

o  The remaining elements of a Technical File / Design Dossier

o  Trends

o  Two attendee projects.

Getting design controls right is absolutely essential for medical device companies

Design Controls are absolutely essential for ensuring the safe and effective production of medical devices. The FDA too considers design Controls a critical process. Yet, design controls are among the most frequently cited areas for 483 and Warning Letter observations from the FDA. Although intrinsic quality, safety, and effectiveness of a device are known to be established during the design phase; a significant percentage of all medical device recalls are due to design problems, as statistics show.

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The implications of poor design of medical devices controls are quite obvious:

  • They account for a significant number of recalls
  • Design issues can result in complaints and medical device reports
  • Design issues can even create manufacturability issues such as low yields and excessive scrap and rework, for companies.

Get an understanding of the solutions and the ways of implementing them

So, the solution to this problem is to find and fix issues early on in the design process. This is a much more effective and inexpensive alternative to fixing problems for products already in production.

The ways of ensuring a trouble-free design control process will be taught at a seminar being organized by GlobalCompliancePanel, a highly regarded provider of professional trainings for the regulatory compliance areas.

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The Director at this seminar is Susanne Manz, an accomplished leader in the medical device industry, who emphasizes quality, compliance, and Six Sigma and brings extensive background in quality and compliance for medical devices from new product development, to operations, to post-market activities. Please visit http://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/control/globalseminars/~product_id=900629SEMINAR to enroll for this seminar.

A valuable all-round learning session

Susanne will help participants understand and develop design controls processes and tools that are compliant with the regulatory requirements and are a competitive strength for their organizations. She will help them learn from past issues and improve their next generations of product.

She will help participants understand the requirements for design controls and how to translate them into an efficient and effective process for their organizations. She will start with the history and requirements for design controls. She will then move on to a discussion of the requirements and tools in detail. This seminar will include exercises to help participants practice and improve their design control process.

The following areas will be covered at this seminar:

  • Expectations
  • Regulations
  • Process
  • Lessons Learned
  • Myths
  • Challenges
  • Best Practices
  • Inspection Readiness.