Development of technical training in the life sciences

Development of technical training in the life sciences3

Training and Development is a highly developed and evolved, broad body of knowledge. Many employees place themselves at a disadvantage vis-à-vis their colleagues in the absence of the right professional training and development. If employees have to consistently close gaps in their learning, they need to keep upgrading their knowledge and skills. They should also use training and development to understand how to meet the regulatory requirements the organization is required to comply with.

Difficulties of training and development in the life sciences

Development of technical training in the life sciences

This said; the need for technical training in the area of life sciences has not got the attention that many other areas have. Technical training and development skills in the field of life sciences is extremely important in helping professionals in that important area get proper guidance of the regulations in the areas of life sciences and benefit from them.

Technical training in the life sciences applications, however, has its challenges.  Mention needs to be made of two of them: A) The field of life sciences consists of activities such as formulating Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs), work instructions, and having to carry out tests and clinical trials, all of which are pretty complex. B) Regulations are often considered complex to grasp and implement.

A full understanding technical training for the life sciences

Development of technical training in the life sciences1

GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance, will be organizing a two-day seminar, at which professionals in the life sciences will become more familiar with training and development. It will also ease the complexity of their training needs.

The Director of this seminar is Charles H. Paul, who is the President of C. H. Paul Consulting, Inc., a regulatory, manufacturing, training, and technical documentation consulting firm that is celebrating its twentieth year of existence in 2017. Want to understand the importance of technical trainings for the life sciences and know how to implement legally compliant life sciences training programs for your organization? Then, please register for this seminar by visiting Development of technical training in the life sciences.  This course has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

Kindling the interest in training for the life sciences

Kindling the interest in training for the life sciences 4.jpg

Charles will essentially seek to ignite the training and learning needs of talented and technically competent training professionals who may need more focused instruction and direction in the area of technical training in the Life Sciences. He will examine the guidance that all training professionals need at all skill levels to truly build and sustain a training organization in today’s difficult corporate environment, and show how to effectively identify gaps in workforce training and compliance documentation and build effective and inexpensive training materials with the tools that are available.

A very important takeaway of this seminar is the learning of how to integrate Training & Development with compliance, so that the participants can leverage the benefits of compliance to improve the performance of the workforce and the overall performance of technical operations.

Personnel in the life sciences industries that are associated with training, such as Directors of Training, Training Supervisors, Training Coordinators, Training Developers, Instructional Designers and Instructors will benefit from this seminar. The following is the agenda of this seminar:

  • Introduction to Training and Development in the Life Sciences and the Relationship between Training and Regulatory Compliance
  • Training and Development Basics
  • The Building Blocks of Human Performance
  • Building a Training and Development Organization – Leverage what you have and Negotiate for What You Don’t
  • Perform a Documentation and Training Analysis – Discover the Gaps
  • Training Materials – SOPs and Work Instructions as Training Materials – It’s not as easy as you think! Leverage the Opportunity!
  • Working with Subject Matter Experts and Outside Consultants
  • Case Study Review and Discussion – This Approach Works!

Do human factors matter in medical devices?

Do human factors matter in medical devices1

Is there a relationship between medical devices and human factors? This is a question that is seriously worth exploring. According to the ANSI/AAMI HE75:2009 document, human factors is an endeavor for optimizing the production of devices, systems, and many others concerned with them through the use of emotional, intellectual, physical and sensory forms of human knowledge. Both the ways in which these elements are used to enhance production, as well as the limitations inherent into them are factored in. In essence; human factors deal with how humans and devices or machines interact with each other.

Since human factors places the human mind at the center; design and aesthetics play a very prominent role in this discipline. Being an important element of user interface; human factors and user interface have risen in prominence after the explosion of the field of IT. It however, can be put into use in several other areas. The user being the fulcrum of any area of production; human factors has the potential to be a major factor in creating and shaping user interface for a range of products.

Use in medical devices

Do human factors matter in medical devices

How about the area of medical devices? We have seen that user interface and aesthetics are core ingredients of human factors. Are these the major determinants for the field of medical devices? Yes and no. Yes, because the user is of critical importance in medical devices. A wrong instruction or wrong usage can severely compromise the use of medical devices and can go the extent of even causing harm to the user.

No, because when it comes to another equally important element of human factors, namely aesthetics, the interplay between medical devices and human factors may not appear so pronounced. Yet, while role of aesthetics may not be all that critical to medical devices; there is a related aspect, and that is design.

The role of design is very prominent when it comes to the user interface of medical devices since medical devices have to be designed to absolutely precise specifications. Even small deviations or variations can result in harm to humans. Both the patient and the organization manufacturing the devices need to face consequences as a result of these.

As far as medical devices are concerned, the FDA is tasked with regulating them for ensuring their safety and effectiveness. The incorporation of the principles of human factors into medical devices ensures that the product meets specification, design and quality standards and thus becomes faster and less expensive to market. It is because of these factors that human factors are becoming part of the design and development, as well as of the supplementary aspects of medical devices, such as Instructions for Use, labeling and even training.

FDA’s regulations on human factors in medical devices

FDA_s regulations on human factors in medical devices

Under 21 CFR 820.30; the FDA emphasizes that human factors need to be taken into consideration for the following:

  • Design input: To ensure that the needs of the patient and any others who may use the product are taken into consideration

 

  • Design verification: To make sure that the criteria for performance set for the medical are being consistently met, and

 

  • Design validation: To safeguard that the device conform to predefined user needs as well as intended uses, and to also sure that testing is carried out to ensure this function. Software validation and risk analysis are part of this testing.

The FDA has also been placing emphasis on human factors in medical devices in many guidance documents and a number of upcoming Draft Guidance documents.

Full learning on human factors in medical devices

A seminar that is being organized by GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for the areas of regulatory compliance will offer complete learning on human factors in medical devices.

Virginia A. Lang, Principal and Founder HirLan, Inc. and HirLan International SA, will be the Director of this seminar. To gain knowledge of how human factors related to medical devices, please register for this seminar by visiting Do human factors matter in medical devices? This course has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

A complete explanation of regulations and uses of human factors in medical devices

The core aim of this seminar is to familiarize participants with the way in which human factors can be applied into medical devices. Towards covering this, she will explain all the current and upcoming human factors requirements, using which, participants will learn how to keep costs under control and reduce the time for the manufacture and marketing of their products.

Virginia will cover the following areas at this seminar:

  • Overview of Human Factors and the FDA perspective
  • Human Factors Methods and Device Product Life Cycle
  • Human Factors and Risk Analysis & Management
  • Human Factors: What Devices Require Human Factors Evaluation and Validation?
  • Human Factors and Combination Products
  • Human Factors and Combination Products Submitted in an ANDA.

 

 

 

Design of Experiments (DoE) for Process Development and Validation

Design of Experiments (DoE) is a very important process development and validation component in several kinds of industries. DoE for process development and validation involves carrying out a number of tests recurrently and steadily over a period of time. Its responses are then observed.

DoE is important for process development and validation as it offers an understanding of the predictability and reproducibility of an experiment. Fundamentally, Design of Experiments for process development and validation seeks to rule out fluke or chance in the methods needed for bringing about control for a product.

DoE in medical devices

In the area of medical devices, guidelines for Design of Experiments for process development and validation are set out in the Global Harmonization Task Force (GHTF) Process Validation Guidance for Medical Device Manufacturers. This document offers guidance in the area of Design of Experiments for process development and validation by suggesting the exact areas in which design of experiments should be applied during Process Validation.

The GHTF guidance also suggests the use of both screening and response surface designs during Operational Qualification. It further requires Design of Experiments for process development and validation to be used during various phases of design controls. These include:

o  Design and development planning

o  Design verification

o  Design validation

o  Design transfer

o  Design changes.

Get a full understanding of Design of Experiments for process development and validation

The ways of approaching Design of Experiments for process development and validation will be topic of a two-day seminar that is being organized by GlobalCompliancePanel, a highly respected provider of professional trainings for the areas of regulatory compliance.

Jim Wisnowski, who is the cofounder of Adsurgo LLC and co-author of the book Design and Analysis of Experiments by Douglas Montgomery: A Supplement for using JMP, will be the Director at this seminar. In order to gain a full understanding of the principles and application of Design of Experiments for process development and validation; please register for this seminar by visiting http://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/control/globalseminars/~product_id=900794?linkedin-SEO .

This seminar has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

All about Design of Experiments for process development and validation

This seminar will offer total and all-round understanding of all the aspects of Design of Experiments for process development and validation.

Process development studies need to be completed before a process control plan is developed as part of an overall risk management strategy. These process development studies help gain knowledge and understanding about the impact of variation in process parameters on the variation in the product quality characteristics of the product.

An explanation of the methods used

The methodology of Design of Experiments for process development and validation offers a means for identifying process parameters, which impact product quality (critical process parameters) and determine the functional relationship that links the process parameters to those critical quality attributes.

Design of Experiments for process development and validation uses screening designs such as 2k factorial and D-optimal designs to determine critical process parameters. Design of Experiments for process development and validation use response surface designs, such as Central Composite Designs (CCDs) and I-optimal designs for fashioning the functional relationship between those critical process parameters and the critical quality attributes.

A primer on statistical analysis

This seminar on Design of Experiments for process development and validation will present a primer on statistical analysis, during which it will focus on the methods required for analysis of designed experiments. Jim will then move on to the steps to a proper DoE, during the process of which he will demonstrate the nature and uses of important risk management tools such as Ishikawa and FMEA, which can be used pre and post DOE studies.

The Director will also teach how to generate and analyze multiple screening and response surface designs, and why and how each are used. After teaching participants how to present the results, Jim will explain how to update the risk management tools using the results of the studies.

This session on Design of Experiments for process development and validation will cover the following areas:

o  Identify critical quality attributes (CQAs) that will be used as responses in your designs

o  Utilize risk management tools to identify and prioritize potential critical process parameters

o  Identify critical process parameters and develop a functional relationship between those process parameters and your critical-to-quality attributes (CQAs) using both screening and response surface designs

o  Be able to design and analyze screening designs including a factorial, fractional factorial, and D-optimal design

o  Understand the need for adding center points to a design

o  Be able to design and analyze response surface designs including central composite designs (CCDs), Box-Behnken designs, and I-optimal designs

o  Present results of DOE studies

o  Use systematic understanding from DOE studies to update the control plan that is part of the overall risk management plan.

Ensuring that analytical data in laboratories are accurate, reliable and consistent

Ensuring that analytical data are reliable, consistent and accurate is the fundamental reason for which analytical methods and procedures need to be validated. The employment of proper scientific methods and procedures by laboratories and validating them ensures the reliability, consistency and accuracy of the analytical data.

The purpose of doing so is to corroborate the suitability of intended use of a particular test and to confirm that the product produced in the laboratory meets the requirements of quality, purity, identity and strength in the required and set measure.

The imperative for validation of analytical data

The reason for which analytical data has to be validated for the criteria described above can be summarized in the following:

o  Because of the direct relationship it has to the quality of the data it validates;

o  To make sure that the analytical data is trustworthy;, and

o  Finally, validation, verification and transfer of analytical methods are a regulatory requirement, as set out by the different regulatory bodies such as the FDA and the EMA, and standards such as the USP and ICH.

Method validation and compendial methods

Of late, method validation has been receiving very high attention from both regulatory agencies and industry task forces alike. Both the FDA and the EMA have recently released guidelines on method validation and transfer. In addition, USP has suggested new chapters for approaches to the following:

o  Integrated validation

o  Verification and transfer of analytical procedures

o  Equivalency testing and for statistical evaluation.

What about compendial methods?

The verification of compendial methods is needed to demonstrate two aspects:

o  The suitability of laboratories to successfully run the method, and

o  To demonstrate through testing that transfer of methods, when carried on between laboratories, is successful. When a laboratory intends to use an alternative method in place of a compendial method, verification of compendial measures should establish the equivalency of the alternative method.

Comprehensive learning on validation, verification and transfer of analytical methods

A two-day seminar from GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance will address all the issues relating to validation, verification and transfer of analytical methods. At this seminar, Ludwig Huber, the director and editor of Labcompliance, the global online resource for validation and compliance and highly respected author of several books on compliance, will be Director.

To gain the full knowledge of all areas relating to validation, verification and transfer of analytical methods; register by logging on to http://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/control/globalseminars/~product_id=900858?linkedin-SEO .

This course has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

Contents of the two-day seminar

Over the course of these two days, Huber will equip participants with the background needed for getting a proper understanding of the requirements that need to go into validation, verification and transfer of analytical methods. An even more significant learning he will offer is the one on strategies needed for this.

He will provide tools to implement most critical requirements. Also provided are templates and examples for developing inspection-ready documentation. Interactivity will be a major component of this seminar. Huber will sprinkle workshop exercises into and between the presentations. Around half of the total time will be dedicated to practical sessions with real life examples.

An additional bonus for participants is the assortment of tools the Director of this seminar will offer, such as SOPs, validation examples and checklists, all of which will be made readily available on a dedicated website, and which can be used to easily implement the learning gained in the course.

Quality audits for the medical device industry

Quality management systems of medical devices have to go through well-defined quality audits. Medical device companies need to implement these in order to show compliance with quality.

ISO 13485 is the quality management standard for medical devices. Based on the process approach of this document and that of 21 CFR part 820 the Global Harmonization Task Force (GHTF) has set out processes for audits relating to the quality management systems of medical devices. The GHTF believes that insertion of quality management system requirements based on ISO 13485 is a first step towards global harmonization of medical devices. These guidelines are meant to lead regulators into articulating regulatory systems for medical devices.

Purpose of quality audits according to GHTF

The GHTF spells out the rationale for carrying out quality audits for the medical device industry. The benefits of carrying these out can be seen in the following:

  • Assurance that a high quality medical device will be made available
  • Quality audits for the medical device industry make available a harmonized, consistent standard that can be used by future generations
  • These audits are independent, verifiable and objective assessment of the manufacturer’s compliance with regulatory requirements
  • The results of these audits can serve as an important guide for marketing medical devices.

Definition of quality audit

GHTF describes the quality audit as the organizational responsibilities, processes, structure, resources and procedures taken to implement a quality management system.

What should the quality management system cover?

The QMS in a medical device organization should cover the following:

  • Control of documents
  • Control of records
  • Management review
  • Internal audits
  • Corrective and preventive action

General requirements for organizations that audit

GHTF lists a few general requirements from auditing organizations. These include:

Audit types

Apart from describing the audit scope and methodology in detail; the GHTF also has a description of the types of quality audits for the medical device industry. They are:

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Validation of Pharmaceutical Water Systems

validation-of-pharmaceutical-water-systems1

Thorough and proper validation of pharmaceutical water systems is highly essential for ensuring that the pharmaceutical unit uses the right quality of water. This is very important, because water is not only the source of life for humans; it enjoys the same importance in pharmaceuticals.

A very important reason for which validation of pharmaceutical water systems is necessary is that water is not only the most widely used raw material or substance in pharmaceuticals; it is also put to a number of uses in the pharmaceutical industry, such as Quality Control, process, production and formulation. Further, water comes with its own set of unique chemical properties that are obtained because of the hydrogen bonds present in it and its polarity. This makes water versatile, since it allows the dissolution, absorption, adsorption or suspension of various different compounds.

Process for pharmaceutical water systems validationvalidation-of-pharmaceutical-water-systems

Validation of pharmaceutical water systems is carried out in three phases:

Phase I, which is the investigational phase

Phase II, the short term control phase, and

Phase III, which is the long-term control phase

Pharmaceutical water systems are validated through these three steps or stages to demonstrate and ensure that the facility using pharmaceutical water systems has water under its control and is on the right track for production of the right quality and quantity of water in the short, medium and long terms.

Validation through commissioning and qualificationPharmaceutical water systems validation is carried out through two important steps, namely commissioning and qualification. Commissioning is about putting the validation of pharmaceutical water systems through the required phases using the prerequisite methods of documentation. This documentation is a core part of pharmaceutical water systems validation because it allows for different personnel in the organization to not only keep track of the processes involved, but also make changes when necessary.

Qualification as part of pharmaceutical water systems validationQualification is the next important stage of pharmaceutical water systems validation. Here, before a pharmaceutical water systems validation process is started, the pharmaceutical facility should implement the following important steps:

  • Design qualification (DQ)
  • Installation qualification (IQ) and
  • Operational qualification (OQ)

Phase I:In Phase I, the pharmaceuticals facility samples and tests water sampling for anywhere between two and four weeks for monitoring the water system. If the water system is free of failure during this phase, it is considered a successful phase of pharmaceutical water systems validation.

Phase II:In this phase of pharmaceutical water systems validation too, the water system sample is tested intensively for two to four weeks, during which the water sample should show that it is producing the right quantity of water under conditions of stated SOP.

Phase III:Phase III of pharmaceutical water systems validation is the longest and most arduous period, running to one year after completion of Phase I and Phase II. When the water sample passes through this phase, it is said to have completed the process of pharmaceutical water systems validation and is considered fit for pharmaceutical use.

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Applied statistics for scientists and engineers

Applied statistics for scientists and engineers is necessary for a number of reasons. 21 CFR and guidance documents for the pharmaceutical, biopharmaceutical, and medical device industries specify the application of statistical methods for these functions:

o  Setting validation criteria and specifications

o  Performing Measurement Systems Analysis (MSA)

o  Conducting stability analysis

o  Using Design of Experiment (DOE) for process development and validation

o  Developing process control charts, and

o  Determining process capability indices.

Since scientists and engineers are at the heart of these functions, they need to have a thorough knowledge of how to use applied statistics. Each of these particular applications requires different and specified statistical methods. The common tools used for setting acceptance criteria and specifications are data and tolerance intervals, while for setting expiries and conducting stability analysis studies; simple linear regression and analysis-of-covariance (ANCOVA) are used.

For analyzing designed experiment for process development and validation studies, two-sample hypothesis tests, analysis-of-variance (ANOVA), regression, and ANCOVA are methods used, while for developing process control charts and developing process capability indices; descriptive statistics (distribution, summary statistics), run charts, and probability (distributions) are used.

Explaining the importance of applied statistics for scientists and engineers

A seminar that is being organized by GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for the areas of regulatory compliance, will explain the importance of applied statistics for scientists and engineers.

In the course of making the importance of applied statistics for scientists and engineers known; the Director at this seminar, Heath Rushing, who is the cofounder of Adsurgo and author of the book Design and Analysis of Experiments by Douglas Montgomery: A Supplement for using JMP, and has been an invited speaker on applicability of statistics for national and international conferences, will provide instruction on applied statistics for scientists and engineers and statistical methods for data analysis of applications related to the pharmaceutical, biopharmaceutical, and medical device industries.

To enroll for this highly valuable and practical course on applied statistics for scientists and engineers, just register by visiting http://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/control/globalseminars/~product_id=900790?wordpress_SEO .

The course “Applied Statistics for Scientists and Engineers” has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

The tools that help an understanding of applied statistics for scientists and engineers

This course on applied statistics for scientists and engineers will offer thorough instruction on how scientists and engineers need to apply the appropriate statistical approaches: descriptive statistics, data intervals, hypothesis testing, ANOVA, regression, ANCOVA, and model building. The Director will present the ways of establishing competence in each of these areas and industry-specific applications.

The application of statistical methods across the product quality lifecycle is specified in the 21 CFR and guidance documents for the pharmaceutical, biopharmaceutical, and medical device industries. There are many statistical methods that may be applied to satisfy this portion of the QSR. Yet, some commonly accepted methods can and should be used by all companies to:

o  Develop acceptance criteria

o  Ensure accurate and precise measurement systems

o  Fully characterize manufacturing processes

o  Monitor and control process results and

o  To select an appropriate number of samples.

At this seminar on applied statistics for scientists and engineers, Rushing will provide instruction on all these. He will cover the following areas over the two days of this seminar:

o  Describe and analyze the distribution of data

o  Develop summary statistics

o  Generate and analyze statistical intervals and hypothesis tests to make data-driven decisions

o  Describe the relationship between and among two or more factors or responses

o  Understand issues related to sampling and calculate appropriate sample sizes

o  Use statistical intervals to setting specifications/develop acceptance criteria

o  Use Measurement Systems Analysis (MSA) to estimate variance associated with: repeatability, intermediate precision, and reproducibility

o  Ensure your process is in (statistical) control and capable