FDA Trends for Computer System Validation (CSV) Compliance and Enforcement

The main reason for which many companies were reluctant to adapt the technology.

The FDA has set out requirements for validating all computer systems that handle data regulated by it. These should be in accordance with its guidance on computerized systems, first issued in 1983. The main points of this guidance continue to be consistent today, even with all the changes that technological developments have brought in.

The 1990’s was a decade in which this guidance was revisited for its relevance to the medical device industry. This was because the first issuance was limited to pharmaceuticals.  In 1997, in the context of the move of many FDA-regulated organizations to move into a paperless environment, the FDA issued 21 CFR Part 11, which sought to address electronic records and signatures.

A few changes, such as discretionary enforcement measures, have been brought into this guidance from then, to fashion it to the needs of the industry. Yet, this issuance is rather confusing, although it was intended to help the industry avoid creating a huge regulatory compliance cost, which was the main reason for which many companies were reluctant to adapt the technology.

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What are the current trends in compliance and FDA enforcement?  Technology is a major basis for these trends, although there are other that are based on economics, social media, new diseases, politics, and many other influences.

All these will be discussed in detail at a six-hour learning session from GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional training for all the areas of regulatory compliance.  Carolyn Troiano, a senior compliance professional who has worked in the tobacco, pharmaceutical, medical device and other FDA-regulated industries, will be the expert at this webinar, which is being organized on October 28.

Please visit https://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/virtual-seminar/6-hour-virtual-seminar-on-fda-trends-for-computer-system-validation-(csv)-compliance-and-enforcement-10310LIVE to enroll for this valuable learning.

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Everything that is required to protect the validity of data that is regulated by the FDA and is stored in electronic format in computer systems will be explained at this webinar. The expert will describe the ways by which to properly validate an FDA-regulated computer system so that security is ensured and data integrity objectives are met.

It is accepted that implementation and adaptation of the System Development Life Cycle (SDLC) methodology is the ideal approach for Computer System Validation (CSV) and for maintaining the system in a validated state throughout its life. Carolyn will explain this aspect in detail at this webinar.

She will also discuss the key areas that are most important during inspection and audit, including security, data integrity, validation, training, and documentation.

The following areas will be explained at this webinar:

Session 1 (90 Mins):

  • FDA Regulatory Oversight
  • Computer System Validation (CSV)
  • System Development Life Cycle (SDLC) Methodology

Session 2 (90 Mins):

  • GAMP 5 Software Categorization
  • System Risk Assessment

Session 3 (90 Mins):

  • Requirements
  • Design
  • Testing
  • Requirements Traceability Matrix (RTM)
  • Additional Validation Documentation

Session 4 (90 Mins):

  • FDA Inspection Trends
  • Regulatory Influences
  • Response to Change

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About the speaker: During the over 35 years she has served in the tobacco, pharmaceutical, medical device and other FDA-regulated industries, Carolyn Troiano has worked directly, or on a consulting basis, for many of the larger pharmaceutical and tobacco companies in the US and Europe, developing and executing compliance strategies and programs.

She developed validation programs and strategies back in the mid-1980s, when the first FDA guidebook was published on the subject, and also collaborated with FDA and other industry representatives on 21 CFR Part 11, the FDA’s electronic record/electronic signature regulation.

Cleaning Validations Using Extraction Techniques

Cleaning validations are an essential step in the medical device development process. One of the most common methods is using extraction techniques to validate the cleanliness of a device. This webinar will provide valuable guidance on how to achieve a thorough validation of a cleaning process.

Why should you attend:Medical device manufacturers have always been under scrutiny to ensure that their product does no harm to the patient. Regulatory agencies have become increasingly aware of the potential dangers of residual manufacturing materials on medical devices. Therefore, cleanliness has become a hot topic in the medical device community. A thorough validation of the cleaning processes used to remove residual materials from newly manufactured medical devices is necessary to ensure patient safety.

Areas Covered in the Session:

  • Cleaning Validation Overview
  • Defining the Scope
  • Identifying the Contaminants
  • Choosing the Test Method
  • Choosing the Solvents
  • Setting Extraction Parameters
  • Validating the Extraction
  • Setting Limits

Who Will Benefit:

  • QA/QC Managers and Personnel
  • Validation Managers and Personnel

Speaker Profile

Kierstan Andrascik has worked in the medical device industry for more than 12 years. She founded QVET Consulting in 2009 to assist medical device manufacturers with their validation needs. She specializes in cleaning validations for both new and reprocessed medical devices and has established herself as one of the foremost experts in medical device cleanliness. She also provides guidance in many other areas including sterilization, biocompatibility, packaging, and materials characterization.

Previously, she worked at Nelson Laboratories in Salt Lake City, Utah where she served as study director covering a variety of testing including new device cleaning validations, materials characterization, and package testing. In 2002, she began developing a method to quantify residual manufacturing materials on medical devices. In 2005, ASTM published a similar method as F2459. Kierstan has been actively serving on the ASTM Device Cleanliness subcommittee since 2005. She received a Certificate of Achievement from ASTM in May 2007. In the June 2008 issue of Medical Design magazine, her article titled “How to tell if a device is really clean” was published. Then, in April 2011, her chapter “Cleaning Validations using Extraction Techniques” published in the 2nd edition of Handbook for Critical Cleaning. She has a BS in chemistry and mathematics, and an AS in Engineering from Shepherd University in Shepherdstown, West Virginia.

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Supply Chain Integrity and Security

Supply Chain Integrity and Security

The topic of supply chain integrity and security is relatively new in Pharma, having gained prominence in recent years for the reasons described above. Breach of security related to criminal activity is where the issues are most visible and enforcement activity is actively taking place around the globe. In parallel, if we are looking for sustainable, root cause solutions, we must also turn our attention to supply chain integrity and deal with both security and integrity concurrently.

An Oxford on-line dictionary definition of integrity is “the state of being whole and undivided”. Over the last 40 years, the Pharma supply chain has fragmented to the point where it is a million miles from that state. There are now multiple business models, such as virtual, biotech, specialty Pharma, innovator, generics, biosimilars, etc and a divergence of supporting actors, such a contract manufacturing organizations (CMOs), contract research organizations (CROs), central laboratories, third party logistics providers, pre-wholesalers, wholesalers, specialty pharmaceutical providers (SPPs) etc. As a result, our supply chains have dis-integrated to the point where visibility and accountability have become blurred at the edges – and it is this disintegration that has opened the doors to criminal activity and errors in quality outcomes.

The solution is not an easy one. It requires urgent action to mitigate activities of the ‘bad guys’, together with a longer term approach to ensure the ‘good guys’ get better at building and managing robust supply chains. This can only be achieved by collaboration between regulators, other enforcement agencies, technology providers and the industry itself. Where do we start?

We must initially focus on the end-to-end supply chain in its current state. Chains of custody and ownership must be clearly identified and remediation actions agreed by responsible parties to plug the gaps that currently exist. For example, Quality and technical agreements must become far more ‘process’ orientated so that they become working documents shared between business partners, rather than merely a static list of tick boxes. Change control has to work on upstream and downstream impacts that might affect supply chain integrity and procurement must forge supply agreements that impose obligations for supply chain visibility on prospective partners. This and much more needs to happen and will be discussed in the session.

Then we must turn attention to the building of supply chains for the future – the product development phase. This industry is unique in that the entire supply chain must be registered with competent authorities before approval to sell and post-launch changes have to be approved. This places a great responsibility on getting it right from the start. This is where the opportunity lay for sustainable improvements in the physical architecture of the supply chain and the underpinning management processes and information flows. A foundation for this has already been put in place by the regulators through FDA’s 21st Century Modernization initiative and ICH Q8 – 11 guidelines. The key to translating these initiatives into meaningful supply chain improvements, however, it in understanding the patient value proposition and the organizational/cultural elements that must firstly be in place, and these are explored in some depth.

Why should you attend: The Pharmaceutical supply chain has never been in such turmoil and under such attack from governments and regulators globally. The evidence is stark and mounting. Supply chain shortages in the US have moved even the President to demand urgent remediation; high level congressional committees have also asked searching questions of FDA and other involved stakeholders, in an attempt to discover what has been going on with high profile supply chain failures. Cargo theft, diversion and counterfeiting have become almost endemic, with detection and enforcement efforts stretched to the limit. Finally, and possibly most worrying of all, are the cases where materials have been adulterated or substituted with toxic alternatives (for economic gain) and have progressed undetected through one or more stages in the supply chain causing eventual patient death.

Areas Covered in the Session:

  • How to organize for supply chain integrity throughout the product life cycle
  • Current approaches to clamping down on criminal activity in the supply chain
  • Issues causing greatest concern to regulators and how to address them
  • Role of ICH Q8 – 11 in building robust supply chains
  • How the disciplines of procurement and supply chain management (SCM) can be leveraged
  • Role of technology as an enabler

Who Will Benefit:

  • Research chemistry and biochemistry
  • Chemical and biochemical engineering
  • Chemistry, manufacturing, and controls
  • Preclinical Development
  • Clinical Development
  • Regulatory Affairs
  • Quality Assurance

Speaker Profile

Hedley Rees is a practicing consultant, coach and trainer, helping healthcare companies build, manage and continuously improve their clinical trial and commercial supply chains and risk profiles. He has his own company, Biotech PharmaFlow Ltd, based in the UK and handles assignments across the spectrum from top ten Pharma’s through to highly virtual early stage start ups. Prior to this, Hedley held senior supply chain positions at Bayer, British Biotech, Vernalis, Johnson & Johnson and OSI Pharmaceuticals. His skill set covers the range of supply chain management processes from strategic procurement, production and inventory control, distribution logistics, information systems and improvement. His specific interest is in driving industry improvements through the regulatory modernization frameworks of FDAs 21st Century Modernization and ICH Q8 – Q10.

Hedley holds an Executive MBA from Cranfield University School of Management and is a corporate member of the Chartered Institute of Purchasing and Supply (MCIPS). He is a member of the UK BioIndustry Association’s (BIA) Manufacturing Advisory Committee and also regularly speaks at international conferences, being co-chair of the 2011 FDA/Xavier University sponsored Global Outsourcing Conference in Cincinnati, October 2 -5. He has published in US and EU pharmaceutical journals and is author of “Supply Chain Management in the Drug Industry: Delivering Patient Value for Pharmaceuticals and Biologics” published by J. Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, New Jersey.

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Why Trade Compliance and Logistics Must Work Together

Why Trade Compliance and Logistics Must Work Together1

Trade compliance and logistics must work together for a number of important reasons. While on the surface, trade compliance for logistics may seem burdensome for many organizations, the benefits of getting their trade compliance and logistics to work together are multifold and far outweigh the short term effort that goes into it, and that of noncompliance.

Undoubtedly, the most important reason for which trade compliance and logistics must work together is that they ensure that there is compliance with the laws of the countries into which the goods travel. It is a lot easier and a lot uncomplicated to have goods moving within national boundaries, where one can expect familiarity with the rules and the operating environment. In the case of global trade, the story is different.

Need to grapple with multiple laws

why-trade-compliance-and-logistics-must-work-togetherThere is great diversity and complexity of laws that govern trade compliance and logistics. They are now more integrated than at any point of time before because of the advent of new technologies. This brings in a motley mix of the elements of global business, such as currencies, laws, locations, people and so on. Businesses that have a stake in the global trade have to deal with these varieties and diffuse elements. One of the surest ways of ensuring that these are managed rightly is by getting trade compliance and logistics to work together.

Since there is a multitude of international laws that need to be complied with at many stages of the global supply chain; trade compliance and logistics must work together. This is the only sure way of ensuring that the company’s goods and products meet the required international trade guidelines and reach their destination safely.

A way out of the complexity

why-trade-compliance-and-logistics-must-work-togetherFor many in the business of exports, complying with the global supply chain may seem complex. However, knowledge of the laws of respective countries and building a sound logistics and supply chain infrastructure will go a long way in mitigating the problems associated with these. This is why trade compliance and logistics must work together.

Imagine a consignment of textiles originating somewhere in the Middle East headed for North America. This consignment has to pass through a few countries, at each of which it has to be sure it meets the compliance requirements. Finally, even when it reaches its destination, it must ensure that the laws of that country are complied with.

Increased efficiency and enhanced reputation 

why-trade-compliance-and-logistics-must-work-togetherAnother important reason for which trade compliance and logistics must work together is that there are substantial long term gains to be had by doing so. Supply chains that have come about as a result of trade compliance and logistics working together become more reliable and efficient. All these mean reduced costs in the long run, increased customer satisfaction, and enhanced reputation in the business.

Elaborating on the point above, it is also equally true that trade compliance and logistics must work together to pump up nations’ economic growth. A country that ensures that trade and logistics are in accordance with internationally legislated laws on the subject are more likely to be trusted by global businesses. Countries in which trade compliance and logistics work together and result in sound business infrastructure are naturally more preferred by businesses as transit routes or destinations for their products. This brings in substantial revenues to the countries.

 

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200+ followers. WOWWWWWW…

followed- 200

Hello Everyone,

Today we have the pleasure of celebrating the fact that we have reached the milestone of 200+ followers on WordPress. Since we started this blog, we have had such a great time connecting with everyone.  we never expected to actually to connect with other people in the blogging community.

we are so incredibly thankful for each and every one of you who follows and comments on my blog posts. Please know that!

we would continue our blogging in these areas FDA Regulation, Medical Devices, Drugs and Biologics, Healthcare Compliance, Biotechnology, Clinical Research, Laboratory Compliance, Quality Management ,HIPAA Compliance ,OSHA Compliance, Risk Management, Trade and Logistics Compliance ,Banking and Financial Services, Auditing/Accounting & Tax, Packaging and Labeling, SOX Compliance, Environmental Compliance, Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet, Geology and Mining, Human Resources Compliance, Food Safety Compliance and etc.

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Aspects of Regulatory History in the US

The beginnings of all that the USFDA regulates can be traced right to the early decades of the founding of the nation. In a sense, the FDA, even if came to be called by that formal name much later; embodies the discipline and value set that the new created nation sought to represent. Regulation of all aspects of American life was deeply ingrained very early in the nation’s history, and the FDA was one of prime institutions that played a part in making this happen.

How has the FDA evolved and shaped up over the years? What are the important milestones of this history? This makes interesting reading, because the USFDA has had the kind of history whose colorfulness is matched by few other regulatory agencies around the world.

aspectsOfRegulatoryHistoryAn indication of the extent to which the FDA attaches importance to ensuring the wellbeing of the American people can be gauged from the fact that the food and other products that this agency regulates account for a fifth of the total money that the nation’s consumers spend. Just its budget – well over four billion in 2014 – is a good indicator to the way in which the FDA has spread its influence in the various spheres of American life. It regulates almost all food items with the exception of meat and poultry.

This situation has not been reached accidentally or overnight. The FDA has by and large kept pace with the developments in the areas it regulates. This was largely true till the advent of very recent technology-led areas such as biotechnology and the social media, where too, the FDA has been trying to put its best foot forward.

The start of formal regulation 
aspectsOfRegulatoryHistoryA look at the history of the FDA points to the year 1848 as the start of the first formal aspects of regulatory history. That was the year in which Lewis Caleb Beck took his appointment with the Patent Office. His mandate was to chemically analyze agricultural products. This is considered as the first task that was aimed at regulating a product that people consumed. This function rolled over to the Department of Agriculture, which was created in 1862.

The Act of 1906The next step in solidifying the regulatory aspects of life in the US was taken in 1906, with the promulgation of the Pure Food and Drugs Act in 1906. Stretching to some two decades of wrangling between the American Congress and the food industry to formulate, the Act of 1906 sought to prohibit adulterated and misbranded food and drugs from interstate commerce.

The 1938 Food, Drug, and Cosmetic ActThe next major milestone in the aspects of regulatory history in the US took place in 1938. The 1938 Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act prescribed and detailed the legal requirements for products the FDA – which this Act created – regulated. In this Act, one can trace the earliest tidings of a major activity that the FDA has been carrying out since then: Prescribing the requirements for ensuring quality by prohibiting false claims by manufacturers and advertisers.

aspectsOfRegulatoryHistoryPresident Franklin D. Roosevelt signing the 1938 Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

Over time, the 1938 Act expanded to include more areas such as cosmetics, devices and veterinary medicines, thus strengthening the foundation for regulation and making it more expansive. Since the passage of the 1938 Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act; two major events happened on the regulatory scene. The outbreak of tetanus and diphtheria diseases in the 1960’s compelled the FDA to take a more proactive approach to vaccinations.

Another major, earthshaking event was the tragedy that thalidomide unleashed on Europe in the 1960’s, which stunted the growth of hundreds of children, which was mainly due to regulatory lapse. This did not happen in the US, mainly because of the efforts and diligence shown by Frances Kelsey, in her role as FDA reviewer. Frances plainly refused to approve thalidomide because she was not convinced about its safety, an act which made her a cult figure in FDA and American and Canadian medicinal history till her death in 2015.

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Aspects of regulatory history in the US in the 1990’sFollowing the 1960’s, the next major milestone in the aspects of regulatory history in the US happened in 1990, when the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act was passed. This law was important because it changed the American perspective of labeling of products in the food and pharmaceutical industries. The Nutrition Labeling and Education Act requires manufacturers to provide nutritional information about products on their labels, with the caveat that false labeling information will lead to consequences.

 

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Good Documentation Practice Guideline is simple: just write

Good Documentation Practices are the soul of many regulated industries. The FDA, like all other regulatory agencies, makes GDP a central element of its regulations, and bases it on the principle of evidence. For the FDA and other regulatory agencies across the world, what is not documented is nonexistent.

Good Documentation Practices are essential for a number of disciplines. The soul of documentation is, naturally, the written word. What happens when something that happened is not actually written down? It is a work of no practical use, because apart from those that carried out the particular undocumented task; no one else is aware of it. And even when the people who did that task or were witness to it are prone to have their own interpretation and perception of what was done. This is why proof in the form of writing is the most important element of Good Documentation Practices.

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What to write, and how toGDP should not only be about just writing down; it is about what to write and also, how, meaning, in what manner. If there has been an intervention in any method of manufacture or any other activity in the regulated industries; the change should be noted down in the proper format as prescribed by the FDA. This enables everyone concerned, from the people in the organization to the auditors to the regulatory agencies, to clearly identify what action was carried out, by whom and when. This further leads to a discovery of the impact of the actions. This is the key to determining the effectiveness of the application of the GDP principles in the particular case.

goodDocumentationPracticesGuidelinesThis is why the FDA has very clear-cut requirements and expectations of GDP from the industries it regulates. These clearly explain the method by which to document the said document, the ways of doing it, and what actions to take when the need arises.

Quality Assurance is unthinkable without the application of GDP principles. The main reason for establishing GDP is ensure that the documentation does the following to the record in question:

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What needs to be documented?Another major element of GDP is to determine what is to be documented. The FDA and other regulatory agencies require the principles of Good Documentation Practices to be applied across a number of activities at different stages. These include:

goodDocumentationPracticesGuidelines

The EMA’s requirements
goodDocumentationPracticesGuidelinesThe EMA also has clear-cut guidelines on Good Documentation Practices. Some of its core requirements relate to

  • Specifications
  • All aspects of the manufacturing including the product’s formulae, the way in which the processing was done, the methods of its packaging, and the extent to which its testing instructions are written down
  • SOPs
  • Protocols
  • Technical agreements

Further, most regulatory agencies have their own requirements with regard to the styling, ways by which the amendments, if any, need to be jotted down, the type of ink to be used, the way in which the review, if any, needs to be entered, and who should put signatures and where, so on. Manufacturers who fall under the purview of respective regulatory agencies need to adhere to these.

And, for other reasons, as wellImplementing Good Documentation Practices is a great idea to have for meeting regulatory requirements, because companies that do not meet these requirements are in a spot of bother about a number of issues. However, in addition to this, there is also the need for maintaining GDP for business reasons, as well. A business that complies with the requirements set out by the FDA or other regulatory agencies in relation to Good laboratory practices, the CFR regulations such as 21 CFR Parts that apply to various industries, and also as required as part of national and global agencies; earns a good name in the market and is considered a reliable company.

 

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