Do human factors matter in medical devices?

Do human factors matter in medical devices1

Is there a relationship between medical devices and human factors? This is a question that is seriously worth exploring. According to the ANSI/AAMI HE75:2009 document, human factors is an endeavor for optimizing the production of devices, systems, and many others concerned with them through the use of emotional, intellectual, physical and sensory forms of human knowledge. Both the ways in which these elements are used to enhance production, as well as the limitations inherent into them are factored in. In essence; human factors deal with how humans and devices or machines interact with each other.

Since human factors places the human mind at the center; design and aesthetics play a very prominent role in this discipline. Being an important element of user interface; human factors and user interface have risen in prominence after the explosion of the field of IT. It however, can be put into use in several other areas. The user being the fulcrum of any area of production; human factors has the potential to be a major factor in creating and shaping user interface for a range of products.

Use in medical devices

Do human factors matter in medical devices

How about the area of medical devices? We have seen that user interface and aesthetics are core ingredients of human factors. Are these the major determinants for the field of medical devices? Yes and no. Yes, because the user is of critical importance in medical devices. A wrong instruction or wrong usage can severely compromise the use of medical devices and can go the extent of even causing harm to the user.

No, because when it comes to another equally important element of human factors, namely aesthetics, the interplay between medical devices and human factors may not appear so pronounced. Yet, while role of aesthetics may not be all that critical to medical devices; there is a related aspect, and that is design.

The role of design is very prominent when it comes to the user interface of medical devices since medical devices have to be designed to absolutely precise specifications. Even small deviations or variations can result in harm to humans. Both the patient and the organization manufacturing the devices need to face consequences as a result of these.

As far as medical devices are concerned, the FDA is tasked with regulating them for ensuring their safety and effectiveness. The incorporation of the principles of human factors into medical devices ensures that the product meets specification, design and quality standards and thus becomes faster and less expensive to market. It is because of these factors that human factors are becoming part of the design and development, as well as of the supplementary aspects of medical devices, such as Instructions for Use, labeling and even training.

FDA’s regulations on human factors in medical devices

FDA_s regulations on human factors in medical devices

Under 21 CFR 820.30; the FDA emphasizes that human factors need to be taken into consideration for the following:

  • Design input: To ensure that the needs of the patient and any others who may use the product are taken into consideration

 

  • Design verification: To make sure that the criteria for performance set for the medical are being consistently met, and

 

  • Design validation: To safeguard that the device conform to predefined user needs as well as intended uses, and to also sure that testing is carried out to ensure this function. Software validation and risk analysis are part of this testing.

The FDA has also been placing emphasis on human factors in medical devices in many guidance documents and a number of upcoming Draft Guidance documents.

Full learning on human factors in medical devices

A seminar that is being organized by GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for the areas of regulatory compliance will offer complete learning on human factors in medical devices.

Virginia A. Lang, Principal and Founder HirLan, Inc. and HirLan International SA, will be the Director of this seminar. To gain knowledge of how human factors related to medical devices, please register for this seminar by visiting Do human factors matter in medical devices? This course has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

A complete explanation of regulations and uses of human factors in medical devices

The core aim of this seminar is to familiarize participants with the way in which human factors can be applied into medical devices. Towards covering this, she will explain all the current and upcoming human factors requirements, using which, participants will learn how to keep costs under control and reduce the time for the manufacture and marketing of their products.

Virginia will cover the following areas at this seminar:

  • Overview of Human Factors and the FDA perspective
  • Human Factors Methods and Device Product Life Cycle
  • Human Factors and Risk Analysis & Management
  • Human Factors: What Devices Require Human Factors Evaluation and Validation?
  • Human Factors and Combination Products
  • Human Factors and Combination Products Submitted in an ANDA.

 

 

 

Knowledge of employment laws is absolutely crucial for organizations

As the new presidential administration settles in in the US, employment law could be an area in which to expect tremendous changes. While what the new president’s open and vocal support for protection of the domestic workforce will mean to employment laws may take some to fully unfold and unravel; a look at the evolution of the important employment laws and the changes taking place into them of late should serve as some kind of indication of what is to come.

One thing that is certain is that 2017 is going to be an uncertain year for employment law. Changes that could make a big difference to many organizations can be expected to be rolled out by the new administration. A fact of additional significance to employers is that there has been a steady increase in the number of employment lawsuits of late.

In 2016, enforcement actions by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) gave the agency a staggering amount of between $350 and $400 million in monetary damages. This has been the highest recovery ever from the time it was created in 1965. Not surprisingly, the number of claims filed by employees with this Commission has reached record levels in the last three years.

Lack of knowledge of the law is at the root of lawsuits

Most of these lawsuits are a result of the lack of understanding that employers have of workplace issues. Companies in which the managements are ignorant about these issues or choose to overlook them end up facing a host of issues such as:

o  Discrimination suits

o  Employee turnover

o  Unplanned expenses

o  Settlements

o  Litigation

o  Lawyer fees

o  Low morale on the part of employees

o  A bad beating to their image.

The means to avoiding such scenarios is for organizations to grasp the enormity of these actions. If they have to avoid litigation and other reputation-damaging actions; they need to be aware of the employment law regulations and be compliant with these. They also need to be clear in their understanding of what to expect from the new administration.

A session to help get thorough understanding of employment laws

It is to impart understanding of these topics that a GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading global name in the field of regulatory compliance trainings, will be organizing a two-day seminar. Vanessa G. Nelson, who is founder and President of award-winning Expert Human Resources, which she founded to help companies maintain employment law compliance, avoid workplace litigation, maximize human capital, create great teams, and reduce costs, will be the Director of this course.

To get complete understanding of all the crucial aspects of human resource law, the ways by which to comply with employment laws and regulations and the potential impact on employment law from the actions of the new administration; please register for this seminar by visiting Knowledge of employment laws is absolutely crucial for organizations .

A clear roadmap to advanced human resources and employment law

The essence of this seminar is the roadmap to advanced human resources and employment law that Vanessa will lay out for the participants. Given the factors described above; this understanding is critical, no matter what the size of the organization. The right grasp of employment laws and HR practices is essential if organizations have to become successful at their business. The Director of this seminar will simplify the complex nature and the huge number and variety of employment laws and the issues relating to them.

Participants will able to learn the ways of dealing with often muddling human resource situations and how to apply relevant employment laws correctly to avoid problems. A look at the cost of litigation will perhaps give some idea about the need for employers to remain compliant with the employment laws: Without lawyer fees, a lawsuit costs $165,000 on average. The cost of a case that goes to trial is exorbitant: It is in excess of a million dollars, and comes with the strong prospect of imprisonment for noncompliance with employment.

Understanding the FDA’s Latest Regulations for Computer Systems Used in the Tobacco and Related Industries

 Understanding the FDA's Latest Regulations for Computer Systems Used in the Tobacco and Related Industries1Tobacco, an age-old addiction, dishes out some chilling, unpleasant facts. Tobacco is the US’ leading cause of preventable deaths. Between four and five percent of the entire American population -some 16 million people -live with diseases associated with smoking. Cigarette smoking consumes close to half a million American lives every year, about an eleventh of whom never smoked, meaning that they are second hand smokers who contract diseases just by being in close physical proximity of smokers. The harmful effects of smoking are such that at this current rate of smoking; seven percent of all Americans who are alive today will die a premature death. The average lifespan of a smoker is a good decade shorter than that of a nonsmoker.

The FDA intervenes strongly

Understanding the FDA's Latest Regulations for Computer Systems Used in the Tobacco and Related Industries3

Given the gravity of this situation; the FDA formulated a landmark law in August 2016, which vastly improved and expanded its powers to regulate smoking. It builds on an earlier ruling, The Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act of 2009. The law of 2016 arms the FDA with greater powers to enforce laws on smoking, one of the highlights of which is restricting the sale of tobacco products to minors all over the country, since this population is very vulnerable to exposure to smoking.  The FDA now requires proof of age of the buyer of cigarettes, banning the sale of tobacco products through public vending machines, and prohibiting the distribution of free samples to minors.

Other highpoints of this amended legislation include requiring manufacturers of smokeless tobacco products to enter clearer warning signs on the products, requiring them to disclose the contents; strengthens local and state authority in enforcing these laws, and requires manufacturers to provide scientific proof of claims of moderate risk from these tobacco products.

The amended rule aims at hitting producers of tobacco products hard and brings a wide variety of activities under its regulatory net:

  • Mixing e-liquids
  • Manufacturing or modify any type of vaping device
  • Mixing loose tobacco and making it available to smoke in a pipe
  • Rolling or blending tobacco for cigars
  • Manufacturing loose tobacco that enables consumers to roll their own cigarettes
  • Importing of tobacco products
  • Manufacturing of any tobacco product

The FDA’s regulations on cigarettes and other tobacco products also apply to sellers. The main intention of this modified regulation of August 2016 is that it reviews the ingredients of tobacco products that are sold, the ingredients that go into them, and creates awareness of the dangers of these products, all of which were missing in the earlier legislation.

Learning about all aspects of this regulation

Understanding the FDA's Latest Regulations for Computer Systems Used in the Tobacco and Related Industries

A two-day seminar from GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance, will offer a complete explanation of this law. Carolyn Troiano, IT Program Manager and FDA Compliance Consultant, Smart Resources, Inc., who has more than 35 years of experience in the tobacco, pharmaceutical, medical device and other FDA-regulated industries, will be the Director of this seminar. This seminar has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

This seminar will describe the best practices for developing a compliance strategy, including roles and responsibilities, and the policies and procedures that should be followed to ensure compliance.

Understanding the FDA's Latest Regulations for Computer Systems Used in the Tobacco and Related Industries4

She will cover the following areas at this seminar:

  • FDA Tobacco Control Act
  • Extension of FDA oversight to Vapor, e-Cigarette, Cigar and other industries
  • Details of the August 8, 2016 FDA “Deeming” Regulation
  • Pre-Marketing Tobacco Application (PMTA) Submission
  • FDA Oversight and Compliance Strategy
  • Computer System Validation (CSV) and the System Development Life Cycle Methodology (SDLC)
  • Cost vs. Compliance
  • Policies and Procedures
  • Leveraging Vendors
  • Industry Best Practices
  • FDA Trends.

Understanding the FDA’s Latest Regulations for Computer Systems Used in the Tobacco and Related Industries

 

Mental health staff on long-term stress leave up 22%

Mental health staff on long
Image caption Some trusts saw the number of staff taking long-term leave double in five years

The number of NHS mental health staff who have had to take sick leave because of their own mental health issues has risen by 22% in the past five years.

Those taking long-term leave of a month or more rose from 7,580 in 2012-13 to 9,285 in 2016-17, BBC freedom of information requests found.

The union Unite said cuts to staff and services were putting extra pressure on front-line mental health workers.

The Department of Health said it was transforming mental health care.

Out of 81 mental health authorities in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, 58 provided the BBC with comparable information.

Looking after ourselves

One mental health doctor who had to take mental health leave told 5 live anonymously: “I don’t think I realised it was happening until quite a long way down the road.”

She explained that she was getting irritable with her partner, her sleep was disturbed and she couldn’t switch off from work.

“In the end, I went to my GP who offered me a sick note. I was quite taken aback that it was quite so obvious to my GP that I needed to be off work.” she said.

Media captionFormer mental health nurse on why she had to leave the NHS

“As mental health practitioners, we are pretty rubbish at putting our own mental health first. You need to put your own oxygen mask on first before putting it on to someone else.”

5 live also spoke to a group of community mental health nurses at the Leeds and York Partnership NHS Foundation Trust about how they cope with the pressure of the role.

“I think when you’re so passionate about something it’s very easy to overlook just how much you are taking on,” said Kate Ward, an occupational therapist working as a care co-ordinator in the team.

Read More: http://snip.ly/okuj8#http://www.bbc.com/news/health-41172805

Monitoring the heart’s mitochondria to predict cardiac arrest?

IMAGE
Credit: Dr. John Kheir, Boston Children’s Hospital & Shutterstock

A new device can assess in real time whether the body’s tissues are receiving enough oxygen and, placed on the heart, can predict cardiac arrest in critically ill heart patients, report researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital and scientists from Cambridge device maker Pendar Technologies. Their study, conducted in animal models, is the cover article in today’s issue of Science Translational Medicine.

 

“With current technologies, we cannot predict when a patient’s heart will stop,” says John Kheir, MD of Boston Children’s Heart Center, who co-led the study. “We can examine heart function on the echocardiogram and measure blood pressure, but until the last second, the heart can compensate quite well for low oxygen conditions. Once cardiac arrest occurs, its consequences can be life-long, even when patients recover.”

The device uses a technology called resonance Raman spectroscopy to measure whether enough oxygen is reaching the mitochondria, the organelles that provide cells with energy. In critically ill patients with compromised circulation or breathing, oxygen delivery is often impaired, making it hard for mitochondria to do their job. This is especially a problem for the heart, which has constant high energy needs.

The current standard for measuring tissue oxygenation, known as mixed venous saturation (SvO2), requires repeated blood draws, adding extra risk in critically ill patients. More importantly, SvO2 cannot tell whether oxygen supply is sufficient to meet the dynamic demands of heart muscle.

“We wanted to create an organ-specific, continuous, reliable readout of how adequately mitochondria are being fed oxygen,” says Kheir. “This is the first demonstration of a device that can monitor mitochondria in living tissues to predict impending organ failure.”

Using light to monitor mitochondria

This technology is the product of a collaboration between the Translational Research Lab in Boston Children’s Heart Center, co-led by Kheir and Brian Polizzotti, PhD, and Pendar Technologies (Cambridge, Mass.). “At the bedside, we saw patients who had a limitation to coronary blood flow, and wanted a device that could provide an early warning sign,” Kheir says.

The team created a metric they call 3RMR that uses light readings generated by resonance Raman spectroscopy to quantify oxygenation and mitochondrial function in real time.

 

Read More: http://snip.ly/bt6o8#https://scienmag.com/monitoring-the-hearts-mitochondria-to-predict-cardiac-arrest-2/

Immune cells may heal bleeding brain after strokes

IMAGE

Credit: Courtesy of Aronowski lab, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston.

While immune cells called neutrophils are known to act as infantry in the body’s war on germs, a National Institutes of Health-funded study suggests they can act as medics as well. By studying rodents, researchers showed that instead of attacking germs, some neutrophils may help heal the brain after an intracerebral hemorrhage, a form of stroke caused by ruptured blood vessels. The study suggests that two neutrophil-related proteins may play critical roles in protecting the brain from stroke-induced damage and could be used as treatments for intracerebral hemorrhage.

“Intracerebral hemorrhage is a damaging and often fatal form of stroke for which there are no effective medicines,” said Jaroslaw Aronowski, M.D., Ph.D., professor, department of neurology, at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, and senior author of the study published in Nature Communications. “Our results are a hopeful first step towards developing a treatment for this devastating form of stroke.”

Accounting for 10 to 15 percent of all strokes, intracerebral hemorrhages happen when blood vessels rupture and leak blood into the brain, often leading to death or long-term disability. Chronic high blood pressure is the leading risk factor for these types of strokes. The initial phase of damage appears to be caused by the pressure of blood leaking into the brain. Over time, further damage may be caused by the accumulation of toxic levels of blood products, infiltrating immune cells, and swelling.

 

Decades of research suggest that neutrophils are some of the earliest immune cells to respond to a hemorrhage, and that they may both harm and heal the brain. In this study, the researchers found that interleukin-27 (IL-27), a protein that controls the activity of immune cells, may shift the role of neutrophils from harming the brain to helping with recovery.

Injections of IL-27 after a hemorrhage helped mice recover. Days after the strokes, the treated mice had better mobility, including walking, limb stretching and navigating holes in a floor. In contrast, injections of an antibody that blocked natural IL-27 activity slowed recovery. The brains of the mice treated with IL-27 also showed less damage. They had less swelling around the hemorrhages and lower levels of iron and the blood protein hemoglobin, both of which are toxic at high

Read More: http://snip.ly/5llk8#https://scienmag.com/immune-cells-may-heal-bleeding-brain-after-strokes/

RPS says pharmacists must always be present in pharmacies

The three RPS national boards have jointly called for legal guarantees that a pharmacist will always undertake a clinical assessment or check, and that there must be no legal loopholes that can bypass this requirement.

pharmacy counter patient pharmacist al 17

Source: Alamy.com

The leaked document, prepared by a working group of the Department of Health’s Rebalancing Medicines Legislation and Pharmacy Regulation Programme Board, suggested that current legislation could be changed to allow a registered pharmacy professional, which could include a technician, to take responsibility for the sale and supply of pharmacy and prescription-only medicines.

The Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS) has said it believes a pharmacist should always be present in a pharmacy, apart from occasional short periods of time.

Responding to a leaked document produced for the Department of Health (DH) on the issue of whether pharmacy technicians should be allowed to supervise pharmacies, the RPS has issued an eight-point position statement on the role of registered technicians supervising the sale and supply of medicines.

Read More: http://snip.ly/3pujp#http://www.pharmaceutical-journal.com/news-and-analysis/news/rps-says-pharmacists-must-always-be-present-in-pharmacies/20203609.article

Brain Activity and Good Diet May Prevent Insomnia-Related Depression

Brain Activity and Good Diet May Prevent Insomnia-Related Depression
While lack of sleep is a major risk factor for depression, not everyone who tosses and turns at night becomes depressed. According to a study, individuals whose brains are more attuned to rewards may be protected from the negative mental health effects of poor sleep. The findings revealed that students with poor quality sleep were less likely to have symptoms of depression if they also had higher activity in a reward-sensitive region of the brain.”This helps us begin to understand why some people are more likely to experience depression when they have problems with sleep,” said Ahmad Hariri, Professor at the Duke University in North Carolina, US. “This finding may one day help us identify individuals for whom sleep hygiene may be more effective or more important,” Hariri added.

For the study, appearing in The Journal of Neuroscience, the team examined a region deep within the brain called the ventral striatum in 1,129 college students. Ventral striatum helps regulate behaviour in response to an external feedback as well as reinforce behaviours that are rewarded, while reducing behaviours that are not. The results showed that those who were less susceptible to the effects of poor sleep showed significantly higher brain activity in response to positive feedback or reward compared to negative feedback.

sound sleep 620x350

The effects of poor sleep showed significantly higher brain activity

“Poor sleep is not good, but you may have other experiences during your life that are positive. And the more responsive you are to those positive experiences, the less vulnerable you may be to the depressive effects of poor sleep,” Hariri said.

 

Read More: http://snip.ly/ttax2#http://food.ndtv.com/health/brain-activity-and-good-diet-may-prevent-insomnia-related-depression-1753267

FDA Finalizes Guidance on Interoperable Medical Devices

On September 6, 2017, FDA finalized a guidance document entitled “Design Considerations and Pre-Market Submission Recommendations for Interoperable Medical Devices” (“Final Guidance”). In the Final Guidance, the agency outlines design considerations for manufacturers when developing interoperable medical devices, as well as recommendations about information to include in premarket submissions and device labeling. Interoperability of devices can encourage the availability and sharing of information across systems, even when products from different manufacturers are used. A draft of this guidance was issued on January 26, 2016.

The Final Guidance defines “interoperable medical devices” as medical devices “that have the ability to exchange and use information through an electronic interface with another medical/non-medical product, system, or device.” These functions can consist of a one-way data transmission to another device or product, or more complex interactions in which command and control is exercised over another device. An “electronic interface” is defined as the medium by which systems communicate with each other, and includes both the type of connection and the information content.

According to the Final Guidance, the agency considers the management of risks associated with an electronic interface incorporated into a medical device to be part of a comprehensive quality system under 21 C.F.R. Part 820. Manufacturers of interoperable medical devices should perform a risk analysis and conduct appropriate testing addressing the risks associated with interoperability, the anticipated users, reasonably foreseeable misuse, and reasonably foreseeable combinations of events that can result in a hazardous situation. In particular, the Final Guidance identifies the following considerations that manufacturers should take into account and “appropriately tailor[]” to the device’s interface technology, intended use, and use environments

Read More: http://snip.ly/jeird#https://www.lexology.com/library/detail.aspx?g=54c0daa5-aed0-4976-995b-5e0204c336c4