Do human factors matter in medical devices?

Do human factors matter in medical devices1

Is there a relationship between medical devices and human factors? This is a question that is seriously worth exploring. According to the ANSI/AAMI HE75:2009 document, human factors is an endeavor for optimizing the production of devices, systems, and many others concerned with them through the use of emotional, intellectual, physical and sensory forms of human knowledge. Both the ways in which these elements are used to enhance production, as well as the limitations inherent into them are factored in. In essence; human factors deal with how humans and devices or machines interact with each other.

Since human factors places the human mind at the center; design and aesthetics play a very prominent role in this discipline. Being an important element of user interface; human factors and user interface have risen in prominence after the explosion of the field of IT. It however, can be put into use in several other areas. The user being the fulcrum of any area of production; human factors has the potential to be a major factor in creating and shaping user interface for a range of products.

Use in medical devices

Do human factors matter in medical devices

How about the area of medical devices? We have seen that user interface and aesthetics are core ingredients of human factors. Are these the major determinants for the field of medical devices? Yes and no. Yes, because the user is of critical importance in medical devices. A wrong instruction or wrong usage can severely compromise the use of medical devices and can go the extent of even causing harm to the user.

No, because when it comes to another equally important element of human factors, namely aesthetics, the interplay between medical devices and human factors may not appear so pronounced. Yet, while role of aesthetics may not be all that critical to medical devices; there is a related aspect, and that is design.

The role of design is very prominent when it comes to the user interface of medical devices since medical devices have to be designed to absolutely precise specifications. Even small deviations or variations can result in harm to humans. Both the patient and the organization manufacturing the devices need to face consequences as a result of these.

As far as medical devices are concerned, the FDA is tasked with regulating them for ensuring their safety and effectiveness. The incorporation of the principles of human factors into medical devices ensures that the product meets specification, design and quality standards and thus becomes faster and less expensive to market. It is because of these factors that human factors are becoming part of the design and development, as well as of the supplementary aspects of medical devices, such as Instructions for Use, labeling and even training.

FDA’s regulations on human factors in medical devices

FDA_s regulations on human factors in medical devices

Under 21 CFR 820.30; the FDA emphasizes that human factors need to be taken into consideration for the following:

  • Design input: To ensure that the needs of the patient and any others who may use the product are taken into consideration

 

  • Design verification: To make sure that the criteria for performance set for the medical are being consistently met, and

 

  • Design validation: To safeguard that the device conform to predefined user needs as well as intended uses, and to also sure that testing is carried out to ensure this function. Software validation and risk analysis are part of this testing.

The FDA has also been placing emphasis on human factors in medical devices in many guidance documents and a number of upcoming Draft Guidance documents.

Full learning on human factors in medical devices

A seminar that is being organized by GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for the areas of regulatory compliance will offer complete learning on human factors in medical devices.

Virginia A. Lang, Principal and Founder HirLan, Inc. and HirLan International SA, will be the Director of this seminar. To gain knowledge of how human factors related to medical devices, please register for this seminar by visiting Do human factors matter in medical devices? This course has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

A complete explanation of regulations and uses of human factors in medical devices

The core aim of this seminar is to familiarize participants with the way in which human factors can be applied into medical devices. Towards covering this, she will explain all the current and upcoming human factors requirements, using which, participants will learn how to keep costs under control and reduce the time for the manufacture and marketing of their products.

Virginia will cover the following areas at this seminar:

  • Overview of Human Factors and the FDA perspective
  • Human Factors Methods and Device Product Life Cycle
  • Human Factors and Risk Analysis & Management
  • Human Factors: What Devices Require Human Factors Evaluation and Validation?
  • Human Factors and Combination Products
  • Human Factors and Combination Products Submitted in an ANDA.

 

 

 

Knowledge of employment laws is absolutely crucial for organizations

As the new presidential administration settles in in the US, employment law could be an area in which to expect tremendous changes. While what the new president’s open and vocal support for protection of the domestic workforce will mean to employment laws may take some to fully unfold and unravel; a look at the evolution of the important employment laws and the changes taking place into them of late should serve as some kind of indication of what is to come.

One thing that is certain is that 2017 is going to be an uncertain year for employment law. Changes that could make a big difference to many organizations can be expected to be rolled out by the new administration. A fact of additional significance to employers is that there has been a steady increase in the number of employment lawsuits of late.

In 2016, enforcement actions by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) gave the agency a staggering amount of between $350 and $400 million in monetary damages. This has been the highest recovery ever from the time it was created in 1965. Not surprisingly, the number of claims filed by employees with this Commission has reached record levels in the last three years.

Lack of knowledge of the law is at the root of lawsuits

Most of these lawsuits are a result of the lack of understanding that employers have of workplace issues. Companies in which the managements are ignorant about these issues or choose to overlook them end up facing a host of issues such as:

o  Discrimination suits

o  Employee turnover

o  Unplanned expenses

o  Settlements

o  Litigation

o  Lawyer fees

o  Low morale on the part of employees

o  A bad beating to their image.

The means to avoiding such scenarios is for organizations to grasp the enormity of these actions. If they have to avoid litigation and other reputation-damaging actions; they need to be aware of the employment law regulations and be compliant with these. They also need to be clear in their understanding of what to expect from the new administration.

A session to help get thorough understanding of employment laws

It is to impart understanding of these topics that a GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading global name in the field of regulatory compliance trainings, will be organizing a two-day seminar. Vanessa G. Nelson, who is founder and President of award-winning Expert Human Resources, which she founded to help companies maintain employment law compliance, avoid workplace litigation, maximize human capital, create great teams, and reduce costs, will be the Director of this course.

To get complete understanding of all the crucial aspects of human resource law, the ways by which to comply with employment laws and regulations and the potential impact on employment law from the actions of the new administration; please register for this seminar by visiting Knowledge of employment laws is absolutely crucial for organizations .

A clear roadmap to advanced human resources and employment law

The essence of this seminar is the roadmap to advanced human resources and employment law that Vanessa will lay out for the participants. Given the factors described above; this understanding is critical, no matter what the size of the organization. The right grasp of employment laws and HR practices is essential if organizations have to become successful at their business. The Director of this seminar will simplify the complex nature and the huge number and variety of employment laws and the issues relating to them.

Participants will able to learn the ways of dealing with often muddling human resource situations and how to apply relevant employment laws correctly to avoid problems. A look at the cost of litigation will perhaps give some idea about the need for employers to remain compliant with the employment laws: Without lawyer fees, a lawsuit costs $165,000 on average. The cost of a case that goes to trial is exorbitant: It is in excess of a million dollars, and comes with the strong prospect of imprisonment for noncompliance with employment.

Which universities are pushing the boundaries in life sciences?

If you had to name the branch of university research that has the most tangible impact on mankind’s day-to-day activities, it is likely that the life sciences would be near the top of the list: not many days go by without the announcement of a new drug or gene discovery that has the potential to change lives or tackle disease.

Much of the best research in these fields takes place in the ultra-elite universities that excel in subjects across the board.

But analysis by Times Higher Education of the institutions that make up the World University Rankings reveals that there is a cluster of institutions just below this elite that are particularly strong in the life sciences and in driving forward innovation.

The 120 “life science challengers” tend to pitch much higher in the subject rankings related to clinical research and life sciences, as might be expected, with the bulk of them achieving overall scores in the middle to upper ranges (see below).

Which universities are pushing the boundaries in life sciencesHowever, they also perform very strongly in terms of the citation impact of their research, something that can be credited to their excelling in fields where journal article activity is key. Unlike the “technology challengers” (another cluster in the rankings), they also tend to be older universities, with few having been established less than 50 years ago.

Beyond these similarities though, the factors that drive the individual successes of the institutions are varied. In some cases excellent strategic decisions taken by the university are a factor; in others the local or regional ecosystem for research plays a part.

Sweden, which has five institutions in the list (headed by the medical research specialist Karolinska Institute), is one example where the ecosystem for life sciences appears to be a key factor.

Ulf Landegren, professor of molecular medicine at Uppsala University, another of the Swedish institutions in the list, said that the country had historically excelled in many life science fields, but that it was now taking its performance to another level with the help of collaborative programmes. The Science for Life Laboratory is one such programme – government-funded, it is based in Uppsala and also in Stockholm.

The SciLifeLab, as it is known, allows researchers from across Sweden to use cutting-edge and often expensive technology without paying for the privilege (apart from the costs of “disposables” used in lab work). Companies and scientists based outside Sweden can also use the facilities, but must face the full cost of doing so.

Professor Landegren, who was heavily involved in setting up Uppsala’s SciLifeLab site, said the effect of the scheme “has been that Swedish scientists now have ready access to advanced techniques that they may not themselves have the economy or the skills to set up”.

“Increasingly we see that life science is going the way of physics, in that technology is getting a little too expensive and complicated for individuals to have all the resources they need to answer their research questions so you might as well centralise it,” he explained.

He added that as well as making “generic” technology and techniques available to all Swedish scientists, SciLifeLab went a stage further by also identifying emerging “beyond state-of-the-art” approaches to research and capitalising on them before they spread to other countries and universities.

Access to expensive technology and the latest techniques is a theme carried across to other institutions that make the list.

Ross Coppel, director of research in the Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences at Australia’s Monash University, puts its success down to past strategic decisions to invest properly in the best academic staff and equipment, but also to the skilled technicians who operate facilities.

He said universities’ research strategies “are often very similar and it [success] comes down to your capacity to implement and execute your vision. I think we were in the fortunate position of having the financial resource to do it [and] the determination to do it and it’s worked out for us very well”.

On the role of technicians, he said Monash had focused on their field being a career path in its own right, with good job security and benefits. In return, in terms of testing new techniques and advancing research technology, “we look to them also to be pushing the boundaries of what is achievable”, explained Professor Coppel.

Beyond smaller research nations like Sweden and Australia, the life science challengers cluster is dominated by institutions in the US and UK.

With 35 institutions of the 120 (the UK has 24), the US is out in front, with a number of private institutions excelling in research. Here, the unique position that some American universities occupy – having strong ties to hospitals and the general healthcare system – is an obvious explanation for their success.

Emory University in Atlanta, for instance, is behind the state of Georgia’s biggest healthcare system – not-for-profit Emory Healthcare – while the US’ Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has its headquarters adjacent to the university’s campus. This geographic proximity between researchers and the practical application of their findings has obvious collaborative benefits.

But the university is also keen to stress the importance of its global reach through its success in spinning out research into the healthcare market and its academic links overseas.

David Stephens, vice-president for research at Emory, said that the institution had “realised its greatest success in commercialising research discoveries in the field of infectious diseases. For example, nine out of 10 US HIV/Aids patients, and thousands more globally, are on life-saving drugs discovered at Emory”.

Meanwhile, an effect of its international collaborations can be seen in the recent joint set-up with the University of Queensland – another life science challenger institution – of a multimillion-dollar biotech company developing cancer treatments.

simon.baker@timeshighereducation.com

Implementing ICH guidelines-compliant validation

Laboratory, Medical and Device2.jpg

Professionals in the field of statistical analysis need to possess clarity on understanding and interpreting statistical concepts used to investigate quantitative ICH Guidelines, such as:

  • Analytical methods validation
  • Procedures and acceptance criteria in calibration limits
  • Process and Quality Control
  • Process and quality controls
  • ICH Q8 and Q9.

The ICH tripartite-harmonized ICH Guideline on Text, which was previously coded as Q2A guideline, is the guideline the ICH has set out for analytical methods validation. It was finalized in October 1994 under Step 4. Identification of the various validation parameters that are required for a number of analytical methods is the aim of this guideline. It also lays down the characteristics and parameters that have to be taken into consideration when validating the analytical procedures that are included in the registration applications.

ICH tripartite-harmonized ICH Guideline on Methodology, which used to be previously coded as Q2B is the ICH guideline for procedures and acceptance criteria in calibration limits. Finalized in November 1996 under Step 4; this guideline extends the ICH guideline on Text, or what is called Q2A (mentioned above). It comprises the actual experimental data required, along with the statistical interpretation, for the validation of a variety of analytical procedures.

Current Step 4 for process and Quality Control

Laboratory, Medical and Device4

The Current Step 4 version of the ICH-harmonized Tripartite Guideline is the current guideline for process and Quality Control. The regulatory bodies of the three biggest pharmaceutical markets in the world, namely the US, the EU and Japan have recommended the final draft of this guideline for adoption.

Professionals who want to achieve harmonization in Quality Meeting are required to meet critical milestones. These milestones include conducting stability studies, understanding the way the studies define relevant limits for the testing of impurities, and following a more flexible approach to pharmaceutical quality that is based on the principles of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) risk management. The ICH’s Quality guidelines on harmonization relating to Quality cover the following areas:

Complete learning on the areas of Validation in accordance with ICH guidelines

Which laboratory records should be retained and for how long

Considering the complexity and the breadth of the issues associated with these techniques, which cover both the pharmaceutical and clinical applications, and considering that these techniques apply to a number of area such as stability testing, outlier analysis and risk management; it is important and necessary for professionals in this area to get proper guidance on validation.

GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for the areas of regulatory compliance, will offer this learning at a seminar that it is organizing. The Director of this seminar is Dr. Alfred Bartolucci, who serves as Emeritus Professor of Biostatistics at the University of Alabama. To register for this seminar, please visit Implementing ICH guidelines-compliant validation. This seminar has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

A thorough understanding of statistical concepts

Laboratory, Medical and Device3

The statistical concepts used for investigating quantitative ICH Guidelines, such as analytical methods validation, procedures and acceptance criteria in calibration limits, and process and Quality Control, as well as with ICH Q8 and Q9, will all be covered in depth at this seminar.

Although not a formal course in statistics, this seminar will offer an applied approach to the statistical techniques used and will show how to reasonably interpret them. This learning will help participants to address the various challenges facing pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies when they are required to quantify results in a meaningful interpretable manner through tabulations and graphical presentations.

The expectations of different regulatory agencies regarding the quantification and development of a sound statistical monitoring of a properly utilized, effective, and efficient process control will also be taken up for discussion at this seminar. Dr. Bartolucci will familiarize the participants with the critical aspects of the statistical methods. He will explain the practical application of these guidelines.

This seminar will offer the following learning objectives:

 

 

 

 

 

An integrated approach is needed for Complaints Handling, Adverse Event Reporting, and Recalls

Adverse Event Reporting, and Recalls4

The fact that medical device manufacturers work and operate in various regulatory systems whose requirements are different and not always consistent with each other is recognized and empathized by the new ISO version, the ISO 13485:2016. Because of the divergence in the requirements of each regulatory system; manufacturers are required to identify their roles, as well as the regulatory requirements for that role, and then incorporate them into their Quality Management System.

When it comes to post-market device issues; the various jurisdictions, however, deal with these in different ways. Three interlocking, interrelated processes need to go into the QMS:

  • Complaint management
  • Adverse event reporting
  • Recalls

Supporting QMS processes such as corrective action and design changes also need to complement these three processes. Over and above the QMS processes come the regulatory requirements, which usually involve areas such as recordkeeping and reporting.

A complete learning on how to implement an integrated QMS

Adverse Event Reporting, and Recalls3

A highly educative and valuable learning session on these primary and secondary QMS processes and the way they need to be understood and implemented vis-à-vis the US, EU, and Canadian regulations is being organized by GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance.

The Director of this two-day seminar is Dan O’Leary, who is President of Ombu Enterprises, LLC, a company offering training and execution in Operational Excellence, which focuses on analytic skills and a systems approach to operations management. Dan brings more than 30 years’ experience in quality, operations, and program management in regulated industries including aviation, defense, medical devices, and clinical labs.

To understand the way in which to implement an integrated QMS in which the various aspects of complaints, adverse reporting and recalls are built; please register for this seminar by visiting An integrated approach is needed for Complaints Handling, Adverse Event Reporting, and Recalls This seminar has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

Alignment with the FDA’s QMS is a major point

Complaints, Adverse Event Reporting, and Recalls - An Integrated Approach

One of the highlights of the final version of the ISO 13485:2016 standard, which has now become available, is the extent of its alignment with the FDA’s Quality Management System (QMS) requirement. Although the degree of alignment set out in 2016 version of 13485 is significantly higher than that of the previous version of 2003; there still do exist a few points at which it deviates from the FDA’s QMS. Companies that are required to comply with this standard have to keep this in mind.

Now that the ISO 13485:2016, the Medical Device Single Audit Program (MDSAP), and the new EU Medical Device Regulation have been introduced; companies need to update their QMS and integrate all of the elements if their implementation has to be effective and compliant. At this two-day session, Dan will provide the tools that the participants will need for this.

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The agenda of this learning session will be the following:

  • The Regulatory Structure
  • FDA QSR
  • ISO 13485:2016 and regional variants
  • ISO 14971:2007 and regional variants
  • Implementing MDSAP
  • The EU Medical Device Regulation
  • Servicing
  • Identification of problems
  • Servicing data analysis
  • Input to the complaint process
  • Complaints

Identifying complaints

  • Evaluating complaints
  • Investigating complaints
  • Complaint data analysis
  • Input to the corrective action process
  • Input to the risk management process
  • Corrective Action
  • Developing the process
  • Analyzing product and process information
  • Determining subsequent actions
  • Input to the design process
  • Input to the risk management process
  • Design and Design Changes
  • Determining the need for a design change
  • Documenting design changes
  • Design change verification and validation
  • Input to the risk management process
  • Input to the pre-market submission process
  • Risk Management
  • ISO 14971:2007 and regional variants
  • Incorporating post-market information
  • Updating Pre-market Submissions
  • US – The 510(k) guidance
  • EU – Technical files and design dossiers
  • Canada – License changes
  • Adverse Event Reporting
  • US – MDR
  • EU – Vigilance Reports
  • Canada – Mandatory Problem Reporting
  • Recalls
  • US – Corrections and Removals
  • EU – Field Safety Corrective Actions
  • Canada – Recall.

 

Development of technical training in the life sciences

Development of technical training in the life sciences3

Training and Development is a highly developed and evolved, broad body of knowledge. Many employees place themselves at a disadvantage vis-à-vis their colleagues in the absence of the right professional training and development. If employees have to consistently close gaps in their learning, they need to keep upgrading their knowledge and skills. They should also use training and development to understand how to meet the regulatory requirements the organization is required to comply with.

Difficulties of training and development in the life sciences

Development of technical training in the life sciences

This said; the need for technical training in the area of life sciences has not got the attention that many other areas have. Technical training and development skills in the field of life sciences is extremely important in helping professionals in that important area get proper guidance of the regulations in the areas of life sciences and benefit from them.

Technical training in the life sciences applications, however, has its challenges.  Mention needs to be made of two of them: A) The field of life sciences consists of activities such as formulating Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs), work instructions, and having to carry out tests and clinical trials, all of which are pretty complex. B) Regulations are often considered complex to grasp and implement.

A full understanding technical training for the life sciences

Development of technical training in the life sciences1

GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance, will be organizing a two-day seminar, at which professionals in the life sciences will become more familiar with training and development. It will also ease the complexity of their training needs.

The Director of this seminar is Charles H. Paul, who is the President of C. H. Paul Consulting, Inc., a regulatory, manufacturing, training, and technical documentation consulting firm that is celebrating its twentieth year of existence in 2017. Want to understand the importance of technical trainings for the life sciences and know how to implement legally compliant life sciences training programs for your organization? Then, please register for this seminar by visiting Development of technical training in the life sciences.  This course has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

Kindling the interest in training for the life sciences

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Charles will essentially seek to ignite the training and learning needs of talented and technically competent training professionals who may need more focused instruction and direction in the area of technical training in the Life Sciences. He will examine the guidance that all training professionals need at all skill levels to truly build and sustain a training organization in today’s difficult corporate environment, and show how to effectively identify gaps in workforce training and compliance documentation and build effective and inexpensive training materials with the tools that are available.

A very important takeaway of this seminar is the learning of how to integrate Training & Development with compliance, so that the participants can leverage the benefits of compliance to improve the performance of the workforce and the overall performance of technical operations.

Personnel in the life sciences industries that are associated with training, such as Directors of Training, Training Supervisors, Training Coordinators, Training Developers, Instructional Designers and Instructors will benefit from this seminar. The following is the agenda of this seminar:

  • Introduction to Training and Development in the Life Sciences and the Relationship between Training and Regulatory Compliance
  • Training and Development Basics
  • The Building Blocks of Human Performance
  • Building a Training and Development Organization – Leverage what you have and Negotiate for What You Don’t
  • Perform a Documentation and Training Analysis – Discover the Gaps
  • Training Materials – SOPs and Work Instructions as Training Materials – It’s not as easy as you think! Leverage the Opportunity!
  • Working with Subject Matter Experts and Outside Consultants
  • Case Study Review and Discussion – This Approach Works!

The ways of applying ISO 14971, IEC 62304 and IEC62366-1 to medical device software

The ways of applying ISO 14971, IEC 62304 and IEC62366-1 to medical device software 3

Diligence, complete and proper examination and assessment of the gaps, and correction of the gaps right from the very start of product development are the core characteristics that need to go into implementing risk management of software used in medical devices.

These are the reasons for it:

  1. Lack of proper and complete implementation and gaps in them lead to major drawbacks such as production delays or deficiencies. Getting the necessary regulatory certification or approval or both for such products is almost impossible

 

  1. Because of the inseparable bond between most activities and the development lifecycle; a medical device manufacturer will find it extremely difficult to separate any single activity and perform it with retroactive effect after a gap is detected. The detection of gaps in the midway stage of production neutralizes all the activities performed till then, causing the company to have to start from the beginning, no matter at which stage the gap is detected. The delays and cost overruns from such a scenario are extremely high.

Is there a way out? Yes. Embedding software risk management into the bigger scope of overall risk management is the solution. This is the cure to defective product development. This is why companies need to implement globally applicable standard requirements such as ISO 14971 and IEC 62304. These are important guidelines for helping medical device companies overcome the impediments associated with risk management of software used in medical devices.

Regulatory agencies around the world expect medical device companies to implement these global standards, which make risk management mandatory to almost any activity in the medical device industry.

The IEC 62366-1: 2015

The ways of applying ISO 14971, IEC 62304 and IEC62366-1 to medical device software

There is also the IEC 62366-1: 2015 in addition to ISO 14971 and IEC 62304. The IEC 62366-1: 2015 specifies a process that a manufacturer has to use to consider, state, develop and assess the safety aspect of the usability of a medical device. It relies on human factors engineering in its usability process to help the manufacturer in evaluating and mitigating the risks associated with normal use, for which correct use and use errors are taken into consideration. The IEC 62366-1: 2015 standard is used for identifying, assessing or mitigating risks associated with normal use, but not abnormal use.

Getting it right from beginning till the end

The ways of applying ISO 14971, IEC 62304 and IEC62366-1 to medical device software1

It is necessary for medical device companies to implement the regulatory requirements set out in ISO14971 and IEC62304, as well as IEC 62366-1: 2015 standards that deal with risk management of software used in medical devices in the right manner to get regulatory approvals and meet quality standards.

How do medical device companies do this? This is what a seminar that is being organized by GlobalCompliancePanel, a popular provider of professional trainings for the regulatory compliance areas, will teach. The course Director, Markus Weber, Principal Consultant with System Safety, Inc., who specializes in safety engineering and risk management for critical medical devices, will explain the ways of designing, implementing and testing critical medical device software in a regulatory compliant environment.

To register for this learning, please visit The ways of applying ISO 14971, IEC 62304 and IEC62366-1 to medical device software. This course has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

The requirements of globally applicable standards

The requirements set out by international consensus, reflected in globally applicable standard requirements such as ISO14971 and IEC62304, which has led to risk management being a mandatory component of almost any activity in the medical device industry, will be explained.

Since embedding software risk management into the larger framework of overall risk management is a critical aspect; this will form the basis of this seminar. Markus will explain all the steps needed to design, implement and test vital medical device software in a regulatory compliant environment in a way that adheres to the principles of risk management. He will also take up system level risk management and the ensuing interfaces to software.

A look at the safety case method

A well-established method used to collect and consolidate all safety related information together in one location is what is called the ‘Safety Case’ or ‘Assurance Case’ document. This step has the purpose of helping in comprehensively summarizing all the risk related activities and demonstrate the safe properties of a device.

The FDA currently requires this method for only infusion pump submissions. But it hoped that this system of documentation will become standard practice across all devices that come up for approval in the future. Markus will offer an introduction to the basic concepts and content of safety assurance cases. He will also describe their utility for internal and external review of safety related information.

Applying risk management principles in practice

The Director of this seminar will lace the session with real-life examples and proven tips. The aim is to help participants derive the benefits of the practical application of risk management. The system level issues of risk management will be explained, along with the increasingly important software-related issues of critical systems.

An assurance case, which will be introduced at this seminar, will be an add-on in making the effort needed for designing, implementing and verifying a safe device transparent. One of the outcomes of this two-day learning is that participants will be able to comply with regulatory requirements at a much lesser cost and with reduced spending on resources.

 

 

Mapping Medical Device Startups Across The Globe — OrthoFeed

CB Insights – Global funding to private medical device companies rose in 2016, reaching nearly $4B in 2016 across 479 deals. The United States receives a lot of attention when it comes to funding medical device startups, but private companies around the world are raising significant rounds.

via Mapping Medical Device Startups Across The Globe — OrthoFeed