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Do human factors matter in medical devices?

The FDA has placed significant emphasis on the role of Human Factors in the approval of devices used for medical purposes. There are several current guidance documents and new proposed Draft Guidance documents. This seminar will compare these Guidance documents

Do human factors matter in medical devices1

Is there a relationship between medical devices and human factors? This is a question that is seriously worth exploring. According to the ANSI/AAMI HE75:2009 document, human factors is an endeavor for optimizing the production of devices, systems, and many others concerned with them through the use of emotional, intellectual, physical and sensory forms of human knowledge. Both the ways in which these elements are used to enhance production, as well as the limitations inherent into them are factored in. In essence; human factors deal with how humans and devices or machines interact with each other.

Since human factors places the human mind at the center; design and aesthetics play a very prominent role in this discipline. Being an important element of user interface; human factors and user interface have risen in prominence after the explosion of the field of IT. It however, can be put into use in several other areas. The user being the fulcrum of any area of production; human factors has the potential to be a major factor in creating and shaping user interface for a range of products.

Use in medical devices

Do human factors matter in medical devices

How about the area of medical devices? We have seen that user interface and aesthetics are core ingredients of human factors. Are these the major determinants for the field of medical devices? Yes and no. Yes, because the user is of critical importance in medical devices. A wrong instruction or wrong usage can severely compromise the use of medical devices and can go the extent of even causing harm to the user.

No, because when it comes to another equally important element of human factors, namely aesthetics, the interplay between medical devices and human factors may not appear so pronounced. Yet, while role of aesthetics may not be all that critical to medical devices; there is a related aspect, and that is design.

The role of design is very prominent when it comes to the user interface of medical devices since medical devices have to be designed to absolutely precise specifications. Even small deviations or variations can result in harm to humans. Both the patient and the organization manufacturing the devices need to face consequences as a result of these.

As far as medical devices are concerned, the FDA is tasked with regulating them for ensuring their safety and effectiveness. The incorporation of the principles of human factors into medical devices ensures that the product meets specification, design and quality standards and thus becomes faster and less expensive to market. It is because of these factors that human factors are becoming part of the design and development, as well as of the supplementary aspects of medical devices, such as Instructions for Use, labeling and even training.

FDA’s regulations on human factors in medical devices

FDA_s regulations on human factors in medical devices

Under 21 CFR 820.30; the FDA emphasizes that human factors need to be taken into consideration for the following:

  • Design input: To ensure that the needs of the patient and any others who may use the product are taken into consideration

 

  • Design verification: To make sure that the criteria for performance set for the medical are being consistently met, and

 

  • Design validation: To safeguard that the device conform to predefined user needs as well as intended uses, and to also sure that testing is carried out to ensure this function. Software validation and risk analysis are part of this testing.

The FDA has also been placing emphasis on human factors in medical devices in many guidance documents and a number of upcoming Draft Guidance documents.

Full learning on human factors in medical devices

A seminar that is being organized by GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for the areas of regulatory compliance will offer complete learning on human factors in medical devices.

Virginia A. Lang, Principal and Founder HirLan, Inc. and HirLan International SA, will be the Director of this seminar. To gain knowledge of how human factors related to medical devices, please register for this seminar by visiting Do human factors matter in medical devices? This course has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

A complete explanation of regulations and uses of human factors in medical devices

The core aim of this seminar is to familiarize participants with the way in which human factors can be applied into medical devices. Towards covering this, she will explain all the current and upcoming human factors requirements, using which, participants will learn how to keep costs under control and reduce the time for the manufacture and marketing of their products.

Virginia will cover the following areas at this seminar:

  • Overview of Human Factors and the FDA perspective
  • Human Factors Methods and Device Product Life Cycle
  • Human Factors and Risk Analysis & Management
  • Human Factors: What Devices Require Human Factors Evaluation and Validation?
  • Human Factors and Combination Products
  • Human Factors and Combination Products Submitted in an ANDA.

 

 

 

Featured

Knowledge of employment laws is absolutely crucial for organizations

support for protection of the domestic workforce will mean to employment laws

As the new presidential administration settles in in the US, employment law could be an area in which to expect tremendous changes. While what the new president’s open and vocal support for protection of the domestic workforce will mean to employment laws may take some to fully unfold and unravel; a look at the evolution of the important employment laws and the changes taking place into them of late should serve as some kind of indication of what is to come.

One thing that is certain is that 2017 is going to be an uncertain year for employment law. Changes that could make a big difference to many organizations can be expected to be rolled out by the new administration. A fact of additional significance to employers is that there has been a steady increase in the number of employment lawsuits of late.

In 2016, enforcement actions by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) gave the agency a staggering amount of between $350 and $400 million in monetary damages. This has been the highest recovery ever from the time it was created in 1965. Not surprisingly, the number of claims filed by employees with this Commission has reached record levels in the last three years.

Lack of knowledge of the law is at the root of lawsuits

Most of these lawsuits are a result of the lack of understanding that employers have of workplace issues. Companies in which the managements are ignorant about these issues or choose to overlook them end up facing a host of issues such as:

o  Discrimination suits

o  Employee turnover

o  Unplanned expenses

o  Settlements

o  Litigation

o  Lawyer fees

o  Low morale on the part of employees

o  A bad beating to their image.

The means to avoiding such scenarios is for organizations to grasp the enormity of these actions. If they have to avoid litigation and other reputation-damaging actions; they need to be aware of the employment law regulations and be compliant with these. They also need to be clear in their understanding of what to expect from the new administration.

A session to help get thorough understanding of employment laws

It is to impart understanding of these topics that a GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading global name in the field of regulatory compliance trainings, will be organizing a two-day seminar. Vanessa G. Nelson, who is founder and President of award-winning Expert Human Resources, which she founded to help companies maintain employment law compliance, avoid workplace litigation, maximize human capital, create great teams, and reduce costs, will be the Director of this course.

To get complete understanding of all the crucial aspects of human resource law, the ways by which to comply with employment laws and regulations and the potential impact on employment law from the actions of the new administration; please register for this seminar by visiting Knowledge of employment laws is absolutely crucial for organizations .

A clear roadmap to advanced human resources and employment law

The essence of this seminar is the roadmap to advanced human resources and employment law that Vanessa will lay out for the participants. Given the factors described above; this understanding is critical, no matter what the size of the organization. The right grasp of employment laws and HR practices is essential if organizations have to become successful at their business. The Director of this seminar will simplify the complex nature and the huge number and variety of employment laws and the issues relating to them.

Participants will able to learn the ways of dealing with often muddling human resource situations and how to apply relevant employment laws correctly to avoid problems. A look at the cost of litigation will perhaps give some idea about the need for employers to remain compliant with the employment laws: Without lawyer fees, a lawsuit costs $165,000 on average. The cost of a case that goes to trial is exorbitant: It is in excess of a million dollars, and comes with the strong prospect of imprisonment for noncompliance with employment.

Cracking the Code to Healthcare Billing, Coding and Reimbursement

A leading provider of professional training for all the areas of regulatory compliance.

Medical billing, coding, and reimbursement are the triumvirate that constitute the heart of a healthcare financial system. These three systems work in tandem with each other; yet, one miss in the cog in the wheel results in utter chaos. The whole system can go into disarray.

A marathon, four-hour session that is being organized on October 17 by GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional training for all the areas of regulatory compliance, will explain all these elements in detail, so that confusions regarding the same can be eliminated.

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At this session, which meets AAPC guidelines for 6.0 Core A continuing education units, Rich Hendriksen, Chief Executive Officer and founder of Nokomis Health, will be the expert. Kindly log on to https://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/virtual-seminar/4-hour-virtual-seminar-on-medical-claims-boot-camp—cracking-the-code-to-healthcare-billing,-coding-and-reimbursement-10309LIVE to register for this valuable session.

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At this course, the expert will explain the fundamentals of medical billing, coding, and reimbursement. He will show how all of these components work with each other. He will demonstrate how to practically apply all the latest industry knowledge and standards. As a result of this learning, those who work with medical claims and claims data stay ahead of the game. They will learn the following:

  • The claim flow process from registration through adjudication and payment
  • How physicians and hospitals set and manage charges
  • Critical data elements on the two major claim forms and what they mean
  • How and why the major coding systems are utilized
  • How various reimbursement methods are used by payors.

The expert will organize the learning in this session into three parts: the life cycle of a claim, coding systems, and reimbursement. He will explain each of these in depth.

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About the expert: Rich has 30 years of experience in healthcare systems, coding, billing, and reimbursement. He has led managed care departments and provider contracting units at a variety of organizations, including hospitals, clinics, and health plans.

Rich has worked with over 70 different organizations, ranging from hospitals and clinics to third-party administrators, law firms, and internet-based companies. As a respected industry expert, he is well known for his unparalleled depth of knowledge in all aspects of healthcare coding, billing and reimbursement.

Facial Recognition Technology in Public Housing Prompts Backlash

The federal government does not regulate facial recognition software in any way, and HUD officials say they have no plans to create any regulations.

This year in Detroit, crews working for the city’s public housing authority cut down a row of bushy trees that had shaded the entryways to two public housing units known as Sheridan I and II.

Their aim: to give newly installed security cameras an unobstructed view of the hulking, gray edifices, so round-the-clock video footage could be made available to the Detroit Police Department and its new facial recognition software whenever the Detroit Public Housing Commission files a police report.

“I think that police departments won’t make frivolous claims based solely on technology,” said Sandra Henriquez, the commission’s executive director. She added, “I think that they will use the technology as one tool that they use in bringing people into the criminal justice system.”

To critics of the widening reach of facial recognition software, such assurances are likely to ring hollow. As the software improves and as the price drops, the technology is becoming ubiquitous — on wearable police cameras, in private home security systems and at sporting events. Landlords are considering the technology as a replacement for their tenants’ key fobs, a visual check-in that could double as a general surveillance system.

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But the backlash has already begun. San Francisco; Somerville, Mass.; and Oakland, Calif., all banned facial recognition software this year. And Congress is taking a look, worried that an unproven technology will ensnare innocent people while diminishing privacy rights.

“We can’t continue to expand the footprint of a technology and the reach of it when there are no guardrails for these emerging technologies to protect civil rights,” said Representative Ayanna S. Pressley, Democrat of Massachusetts, and a sponsor of the No Biometric Barriers to Housing Act, which would ban facial recognition systems in federally funded public housing. It would also require that the Department of Housing and Urban Development send to Congress a detailed report on the software.

At this point, the federal government does not regulate facial recognition software in any way, and HUD officials say they have no plans to create any regulations.

But the technology’s spread is raising serious concerns — on the political right as well as the left. The Chinese government’s use of a vast, secret system of advanced facial recognition technology to track and control its Uighur Muslim minority has set off international outrage. It has also demonstrated how functional the technology has become.

In one month this year, law enforcement in the central Chinese city of Sanmenxia, along the Yellow River, screened images of residents 500,000 times to determine if they were Uighurs.

More read at https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/24/us/politics/facial-recognition-technology-housing.html

To understand AI advancements in health care, there are two storylines we must follow

The common thread running through Topol’s books is that medicine is a mess and technology will save it.

If ever there were an industry that could reap the benefits of AI, it is healthcare. The adoption of this technology to actually make medicine better is obvious. However, with this adoption comes a slew of ethical issues.

Let’s start with some numbers: In 2018, the US spent $3.65 trillion on healthcare. That works out to $11,121 per capita, a 4.4% increase over 2017. In addition:

  • Spending on hospitals, doctors, and other clinic services was $2.16 trillion, holding steady at 59% of total health care spending.
  • The spending category that experienced the most substantial year-over-year increase was the general cost of administering health insurance, which rose 7.7% in 2018.
  • Spending on prescription drugs purchased in retail pharmacies went up 3.3% in 2018, higher than the 0.4% rate in 2017.
  • A majority of the more significant spending totals were due to higher overall prices, while the “use and intensity” of health care services played a smaller role.

The per capita spend in western economies, other than Switzerland, which was about 80%, was 50% or less. The worse news is that the US has slipped to 36th in the world in quality of healthcare. (The above data is from Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and CIA World FactBook.)

Another lesser-known statistic is the magnitude of iatrogenic disease. From Wikipedia: an iatrogenic disorder occurs when the deleterious effects of the therapeutic or diagnostic regimen causes pathology independent of the condition for which the regimen is advised.

In other words, they are harmed by medical practice. According to a Johns Hopkins study, 251,454 deaths stemmed from a medical error – making it the third leading cause of death in the US, just behind cancer and heart disease.

All industries are facing the problem of which areas to apply AI. In an article in Healthcare IT News, some advice for the healthcare industry was: while AI may have the potential to discover new treatment methods, the report finds strongly entrenched ‘ways of working’ in the healthcare industry that are resistant to change. The authors warn that ‘simply adding AI applications to a fragmented system will not create sustainable change.’ Good advice for any industry.

To continue this: http://bit.ly/2lUwsZj

Robotic surgeons set to spark ‘revolution in healthcare’

The robots have four flexible joints like a human arm and are controlled by a surgeon using a joystick and a 3D screen.

Specialists working on patients while controlling automated arms could turn into another standard in medical clinics.

The help of robots in careful rooms are anticipated to change the manner in which activities are performed by enabling medical procedures to be done as keyhole techniques.

As the utilization of mechanical medical procedure turns out to be progressively well known, an expanding number of surgeons are being prepared in how to utilize them. They enable specialists to perform complex strategies utilizing an insignificantly obtrusive methodology.

Expert colorectal specialist Jonathan Morton is among a bunch of doctors who have evaluated the hardware.

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He said: “It’s quite exciting to see robotic techniques rolled out – from an ergonomic point of view, the system is set up better so that the stresses on the body are less, reducing injury rates for surgeons.

“It’s not actually the robot doing the surgery – it’s the surgeon with the experience and the knowledge telling the robot what to do, effectively it’s the same as keyhole surgery with robotics.”

The robots have four flexible joints like a human arm and are controlled by a surgeon using a joystick and a 3D screen. The technology is capable of carrying out a wide range of tasks.

CMR Surgical, the company behind the robot, claims the technology will revolutionise healthcare.

The firm’s chief medical officer, Mark Slack, said: “The vision we have is that we have built a system to enable many more patients to get MAS (minimal access surgery) and all the benefits that that brings for them – like reduced complications, reduced pain – and the aim is to put these in as many hospitals as we can.”

The NHS is developing a £50m framework for robotic surgical equipment, soon to be rolled out across the country.

So does the future of surgical procedures rest in non-human hands?

Richard Kerr, of The Royal College of Surgeons (RCS), believes it’s poised to change the nature of surgery forever.

“The robots are not going to be taking over what surgeons do. They will become an integral part of the tools surgeon use to carryout operations on their patients,” he said.

“Maybe in the long-distance future some aspects of surgery may potentially be delivered by robots.”

The RCS says a majority of NHS trusts have guidelines which surgeons are expected to follow when using robotics

More at https://news.sky.com/story/robotic-surgeons-set-to-spark-revolution-in-healthcare-11810158

GlobalCompliancePanel to organize two-day seminar on “FDA and U.S. Customs Import Rules and Export Traps in 2020”

This plan seeks to reward importers who demonstrate a level of confidence about the quality of food they import by establishing an FDA-supervised, fee-based program.

GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional training for all the areas of regulatory compliance, is organizing a two-day, in person, live seminar on the topic, “FDA and U.S. Customs Import Rules and Export Traps in 2020”, on December 4 and 5.

Casper Uldriks, an ex-FDA Expert and former Associate Center Director of CDRH, will be the Director of this seminar. Please enroll for this session by visiting https://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/seminar/tougher-import-rules-for-FDA-901966SEMINAR

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Smarter, more sophisticated, more agile and more demanding. These are what the FDA and the Customs and Border Patrol Service (CBP) have become of late when it comes to their expectations and requirements from importing firms of the submission of information and adherence to government procedures. Firms that fail to properly execute an import and export program can expect the FDA and the CBP to delay, detain or refuse their shipments.

The new Automated Commercial Environment (ACE) computer program from the CBP has brought in many changes to the process of import logistics and information reporting for FDA regulated products. As a result, companies that do not comply with the requirements set out in the ACE program can experience one of the worst nightmares they can think of: having their shipment stopped before it is even loaded at the foreign port! And then, if they refuse to or fail to use the ACE program, such ships also carry a fine of up to $10,000 for every offense.

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There is more: such companies whose products the FDA detains face a cumbersome, long winding and expensive legal process. The FDA expects companies to have the import coding information accurate and up-to-date. Any company that lacks a thorough and clear understanding of the automated and human review process are almost certain to have their shipments detained.

And then, what happens in a scenario in which the FDA decides that importers should bring the products back to the port of entry after they received a release but cannot locate the product that has been sold? Well, in such instances, such companies are slapped a fine that is three times the value of the shipment, not to speak of the additional adverse legal concerns and strategies that come along.

What do all these mean? Simple: if you are an importer, you are doomed if you fail to comply with the FDA’s guidelines on imports.

Yet, there is a way out of this quagmire, in the form of the Voluntary Qualification Importer Program, which the FDA is implementing under the FDA Food Safety and Modernization Act. This plan seeks to reward importers who demonstrate a level of confidence about the quality of food they import by establishing an FDA-supervised, fee-based program. What this program does is that it facilitates the review and importation of foods from importers who establish a higher level of control over the safety and supply chain aspects of the imported food items.

And then, there is also the extra perk that the FDA offers: its export certificates. Offered at a reasonable fee; these certificates can go a long way in giving an importer a competitive advantage in foreign markets. In fact, a few foreign governments make an FDA export certificate a requirement.

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The aim of this seminar is to offer learning on all these core areas of the FDA and US Customs Import Rules in 2020. The Director will explain how to deal with common problems, such as returns for repair, importing QC samples, and investigational products. The learning will be taught over the following agenda:

Day 1 Schedule

Lecture 1:

FDA Legal Authority Customs and Border Control (CBP) Import Process FDA Import Process Registration and documentation

Lecture 2:

FDA Import Process (continued)

  • Import Brokers
  • Prior Notice Information
  • CBP and FDA computer programs
  • Import Codes
  • Bonds and Bonded Warehouses
  • FDA “Notice of Action”

Lecture 3:

Import Delays Import Alerts Detention Refusals

Day 2 Schedule

Lecture 1:

Foreign Inspections FDA 483 – Inspectional Observations

Lecture 2:

FDA Warning Letters and Automatic detention

Lecture 3:

Import Hypothetical FDA Import for Export Program FDA Export Program Export Hypothetical

Lecture 4:

FDA Export Program Special Import Issues

  • Trade Shows
  • Personal Use
  • Compassionate Use

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https://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/GuidanceDocumentsRegulatoryInformation/ucm448728.htm

Seminar on “Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation” by GlobalCompliancePanel

The stage in which the process design is evaluated to determine if the process is capable of reproducible commercial manufacturing.

The FDA in 2011 provided a guidance titled “Process Validation: General Principles and Practices” for Process Validation in the pharmaceutical industry, during which it established a framework for the same. This framework consists of a three-stage process:

1) Process Design

2) Process Qualification, and

3) Continued Process Verification.

So, what is Process Validation? It is described in Guidance for Industry Process Validation: General Principle and Practices as “…the collection and evaluation of data, from the process design stage through commercial production…” into which the three stages described above are delineated in this Guidance:

Stage 1: Process Design: This is the stage in which commercial manufacturing process is defined, based on knowledge gained through development and scale-up activities

Stage 2: Process Qualification: The stage in which the process design is evaluated to determine if the process is capable of reproducible commercial manufacturing.

Stage 3: Continued Process Verification: Gives the ongoing assurance during routine production that the process remains in a state of control.

While this much is for theory, how do organizations understand the ways to implement these practically? These will be explained in detail at a two-day seminar that is being organized on November 5 and 6 by GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional training for the areas of regulatory compliance.

Being organized in Philadelphia, PA, this in person, live seminar will feature the Co-founder and Principal, Adsurgo, Heath Rushing, as the Director. This course has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion. Please register for this valuable learning session by visiting https://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/seminar/applied-statistics-for-FDA-process-validation-901969SEMINAR

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The aim of this course is to help its participants understand how to establish a systematic approach for implementing statistical methodologies into a Process Validation program that is consistent with the FDA guidance. The Director will begin with a primer on statistics, at which he will focus on the methods that will be applied in each remaining chapter.

He will then move on to giving an understanding of how to apply statistics for setting specifications and assessing measurement systems (assays), which are considered the two foundational requirements for Process Validation.

In the third and final step, the Director will show how to apply statistics through the three stages of process validation defined by requirements in the Process Validation regulatory guidance documents.

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He will take up methods recommended by regulatory guidance documents through all these three stages and provide references to the specific citations in the guidance documents.

Heath will explain how to apply statistics for a range of functions. These include how to:

  • Set specifications
  • Assess measurement systems (assays)
  • Use Design of Experiments (DOE)
  • Develop a control plan as part of a risk management strategy
  • Ensure process control/capability.

Although established for the pharmaceutical industry, it is a useful framework for other industries. Analyses in this course use the point-and-click interface of JMP software by SAS.

At this seminar, the Director will cover the following areas:

  • Apply statistics to set specifications and validate measurement systems (assays)
  • Develop appropriate sample plans based on confidence and power
  • Implement suitable statistical methods into a process validation program for each of the three stages
  • Stage 1, Process Design: utilize risk management tools to identify and prioritize potential critical process parameters; and define critical process parameters and operating spaces for the commercial manufacturing process using Design of Experiments (DoE)
  • Stage 2, Process Qualification: assess scale effects while incorporating large (pilot and/or commercial) scale data; develop process performance qualification (PPQ) acceptance criteria by characterizing intra and inter-batch variability using process design data and batch homogeneity studies; and develop an appropriate sampling plan for PPQ
  • Stage 3, Continued Process Verification: develop a control plan as part of a risk management strategy; collect and analyze product and process data; and ensure your process is in (statistical) control and capable.

Pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical professionals who are involved with product and/or process design, validation, or manufacturing/control, such as Process Scientist/Engineer, Design Engineer, Product Development Engineer, Regulatory/Compliance Professional, Design Controls Engineer, Six Sigma Green Belt, Six Sigma Black Belt, and Continuous Improvement Manager will benefit from this seminar.

2 Day Seminar on “Death by CAPA – Does your CAPA Program need a CAPA?” – GlobalCompliancePanel

Participants will learn the ways of streamlining and monitoring their processes that will ensure compliance and improved performance.

If there is a really solid edifice on which a strong Quality Management System (QMS) rests, it has to be Corrective and Preventive Action (CAPA). This is because a QMS can never guarantee safe and effective products without CAPA. An ineffective CAPA process leads to disastrous consequences like complaints, recalls, 483s, and warning letters.

An inefficiently conceived and implemented CAPA system means time and resources going down the drain. The criticality that CAPA has to a QMS can be gauged from the fact that it is one of the primary reasons for which the FDA issues 483’s and Warning Letters.

All these point to the need for the establishment of a solid CAPA process that is built into the QMS. An organization should ensure that it establishes a compliant, effective, and efficient process. Yet, despite the all-powerful importance that CAPA has for the medical device industry, many manufacturers in this area have difficulties in establishing and maintaining an effective CAPA process.

How do organizations overcome this problem? A two-day seminar, entitled “Death by CAPA – Does your CAPA Program need a CAPA?” from GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional training for all the areas of regulatory compliance, will provide the answers. At this in person, live seminar, which is being organized in Philadelphia, PA on October 24 and 25, Susanne Manz, Quality and Compliance Expert/Auditor for Medical Devices, Manz Consulting, Inc., will be the Director.

Please join us for this highly valuable session by enrolling at This course has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

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The learning offered at this seminar will help participants establish an efficient and effective CAPA process that leads to an improvement in quality and compliance. Participants will learn the ways of streamlining and monitoring their processes that will ensure compliance and improved performance.

Susanne will explain the regulatory requirements regarding CAPA in detail. She will sort out the various myths surrounding CAPA, as well as the challenges of managing CAPAs. This knowledge will help them prevent and overcome common problems and pitfalls. She will offer an explanation of some of the best practices in establishing a CAPA, the knowledge of which helps organizations insulate themselves against an FDA inspection.

Over the two days of this seminar, participants will hear detailed lectures on all the elements of a CAPA program. Susanne will explain the ways in which these elements connect to other parts of the organization’s Quality Management System. The Director will explain to participants ways by which they can create a CAPA program that results in:

  • Improvement in product quality
  • Reduction in compliance issues
  • Advancement in their business success.

An additional benefit the participants will get is the set of tools and checklists which will help them to ensure that their program is ready to face an FDA inspection.

Susanne will cover the following areas at this seminar:

  • Regulatory Requirements and expectations
  • Elements for creating an efficient and effective CAPA Program
  • CAPA process, tools, and techniques
  • Linkages throughout the Quality Management System
  • Root Cause Analysis
  • Metrics, Control, and Monitoring
  • Dissemination of Information
  • Myths, Challenges, Best Practices
  • Inspection Preparedness

This seminar is of immense value to professionals whose work is associated with the organization’s QMS. These include Quality Systems Specialists, Document Control Specialists, Quality and Compliance Specialists, Quality Engineers, Internal Auditors and Managers, Training Specialists, CAPA Specialists, CAPA Managers, Supplier Quality Engineers and Auditors, Quality/Compliance managers or directors for Medical Device companies, General Managers wanting to learn how to understand Quality System requirements, and Management Representatives.