Understanding the importance and benefits of auditing Quality Management Systems

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Auditing Quality Management Systems is a core requirement for ensuring that Quality Management Systems – defined as “…a set of policies, processes and procedures required for planning and execution” in the core business area of an organization, meaning those that impact the ability of the organization to meet customer requirements – are updated and kept in compliance with regulatory requirements. The ISO 9001 set of standards is a step towards helping organizations achieve this end.

The ISO 9001 series, aimed at facilitating and ensuring that organizations of various kinds audit their Quality Management Systems in tune with regulatory requirements set out in this standard; was first implemented in the 1980’s. Today, across the globe, over a million organizations have been certified for complying with its requirements. The ISO 9001 is a tool for auditing Quality Management Systems across all kinds of organizations: big, small or medium to one stop providers to multinational organizations that operate in various geographies.

Why is auditing of Quality Management important?

Understanding the importance and benefits of auditing Quality Management Systems2

ISO standards have been arrived at after years of practice, observation and trial and error endeavors. These standards have evolved over continuous implementation of many best practices that are suited to particular organizations based on the size of their operations and the nature of their business.

An organization that has been in the practice of auditing Quality Management Systems is said to be implementing a better way of dealing with risk management. It is also considered an organization that enjoys enhanced stakeholder and customer confidence, as well as an improved, efficient and effective management and operational systems.

More than anything else, auditing Quality Management Systems are the surest means to ensuring that products and services from an organization meet certain prescribed processes and standards. An auditing Quality Management System officially certifies that the organization task a risk-based, process oriented, streamlined approach to ensure the safety, reliability and consistency of its products and services. A company that puts auditing Quality Management Systems in place is said to be more conscious of meeting customer expectations and makes continuous efforts and improvements into its products and services and complies with the law.

Certification is proof that the organization is auditing its Quality Management Systems

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Certification is like the proof of the pudding in Quality Management Systems audits. A company may claim to be implementing quality standards, but how does the world come to know about it? It is only through auditing Quality Management Systems certification that this happens. For a company to earn auditing Quality Management Systems certification; it has to be audited by the ISO. Upon careful scrutiny of its practices, the ISO awards the organization the 9001 Quality Management Certification.

What are the benefits of auditing Quality Management Systems certification?Certification from the world’s leading Quality Management Systems auditing certifying body gives such an audited and certified company a host of credentials and benefits. These are some of them:

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Implementing the 510 (K) correctly in compliance with the latest proposed FDA changes

A 510(K) is a premarket submission made to FDA to demonstrate that a device to be marketed is at least as safe and effective, meaning that which is substantially equivalent, to a legally marketed device that is not subject to premarket approval (PMA).

There are three types of Premarket Notification 510(K)’s that may be submitted to FDA: Traditional, Special, and Abbreviated. Product modifications that could significantly affect safety and effectiveness are subject to 510(K) submission requirements under 21 CFR 807 as well as design control requirements under the Quality System (QS) regulation. Under the QS regulation, all Class II and III devices and certain Class I devices are required to be designed in conformance with 21 CFR 820.30 Design Controls. The FDA provides guidance on these.

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Needed: A thorough understanding of these aspects and the FDA’s latest proposed changes

In accordance with the concern evinced by many industry groups and associations, the FDA introduced as many as 60 proposals in August 2010, into the manner in which the 510 (K) process could be expedited. This was done with the intention of accelerating the speed at which newly approved medical devices could be made available to patients across the country. However, with the number of proposals being too many and their scope being too wide; the medical industry suggested that the FDA select for implementation only those proposals that enjoyed the broad consensus of the stakeholders, such as increased reviewer training, development of specific and relevant guidance documents, and enhancements or improvements to the de novo review pathway, among other suggestions.

An upcoming seminar by GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for the regulatory compliance industries, will clarify on these areas taken up for immediate change by the FDA and place them in the right context. It will address key resources when making critical decisions. This seminar will offer important insights into the core areas of premarket notifications, as well as the Design Control requirements under QS regulations and Design Controls.

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To enroll for this seminar, just log on to

http://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/control/globalseminars/~product_id=900525SEMINAR?bullet-proof-510(k)-Seattle-WA

The Director at this seminar is David R. Dills, a senior Regulatory Affairs & Compliance Consultant. David provides regulatory, compliance and quality consultative services for medical device and pharmaceutical/combination manufacturers, and also has an accomplished record with more than 24 years of experience with Class I/II/III medical devices, In Vitro diagnostics, and pharmaceuticals in the areas of Regulatory Affairs, Compliance and Quality Systems.

An understanding of the core elements of the PMA

At this seminar, David will help participants understand how medical device manufacturers can locate a “predicate” device and go through the content and format of the 510(K), and offer an understanding of the De Novo process and the expectations for possibly marketing a low risk device, and the potential impact of FDA’s proposed changes to the 510(K) process and why manufacturers need to pay attention to these.

He will also offer understanding of all the crucial aspects of the PMA, such as the differences between the Traditional, Special and Abbreviated submissions, an understanding of the Substantial Equivalence and how it is applied, who is required to submit the application to FDA, where to submit the 510(K) and what to expect with the review and approval process, when a device company requires this process and when it does not, the applicable exemptions to the submission process and special considerations, and so on.

Finessing the ways of using lineament analysis in geological exploration

Geological exploration has many benefits for mankind. Yet, there are a few limitations with the current set of methods being used by geologists. The full extent of technologies is yet to be harnessed.

The right sampling and Quality Assurance/Quality Control (QA/QC) procedures are essential in all aspects of the mineral deposit evaluation process if the best possible confidence in resultant mineral resource and reserve estimates are to be achieved.

Accurate and proper QA and QC procedures and protocols are essential to ensure that data collected and created by the mining organization is of a high level of quality and is in compliance with CIM Standards and Guidelines. Geological quality control procedures are meant to monitor precision and accuracy of the assay data, as well as possible sample contamination during sample preparation and assaying. The quality of the data used determines the quality of an estimate.

Quality-Assurance

Learn to get Quality Assurance and Quality Control procedures and protocols right

The way to do this effectively for better results will the learning offered at a two-day in person, live seminar that GlobalCompliancePanel,  a highly reputable provider of professional trainings for regulatory compliance, will organize. More details of this seminar can be had from

http://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/control/globalseminars/~product_id=900534SEMINAR?using-lineament-analysis-Salt-Lake-City.

The Director, Ricardo Valls, will introduce the participants to an effective and affordable methodology that identifies prospective targets which are related to, or controlled by tectonic structures. This methodology helps participants to concentrate their exploration efforts even over new areas with limited or nonexistent geological information, while keeping their budget in check.

The centrality of QA&QC procedures

Ricardo will explain how lineament and satellite interpretation are a way to define where to concentrate exploration efforts, as well as how to implement QA&QC procedures to guarantee the quality of the collected data. This is necessary, considering that compliance with the industry-established QA/QC is no longer an option, but a necessity for all the companies to implement, especially those that trade in the markets. Quality assurance is essentially the management system that operates to ensure credible results. The prime objective of the field QA program is to maximize accuracy by reducing introduced variability.

The learning will be gleaned from a quality assurance program that the Director has implemented for the field sampling procedures. This includes collection, labeling, and shipping components. The quality control component of this system is a set of activities intended to control the quality of the data from collection through to analysis. It consists of day-to-day activities such as:

  • The adherence to written protocols; up-to-date and suitable training of personnel
  • The use of reliable laboratories with excellent QA&QC systems in place
  • The regular use of quality control (QC) samples (blanks, standard samples, and field duplicates)
  • Diligent record keeping.

Six Systems Approach to Pharmaceutical cGMP Regulations

Six Systems Approach to Pharmaceutical cGMP Regulations.

The FDA has enacted several pharmaceutical cGMP regulations. These are key concepts that are critical to quality systems. Some of the concepts by which the FDA and other regulatory bodies ensure cGMP regulations are Quality, Quality by Design (QbD) and product development, Quality Risk Management, Corrective and Preventive Action (CAPA), Change Control, and the Six Systems Approach.

Of these, the six-system inspection approach is a systems-based approach to cGMP and is aimed at ensuring a robust quality system model for pharmaceutical products.

It consists of the following:

Quality System

• Facilities System
• Equipment System
• Materials System
• Production System
• Packaging & Labeling System

Quality system is the fulcrum

It needs to be borne in mind that the whole system centers round the organization’s quality system. The quality system is the pivot around which the systems approach revolves. It is the core and the very foundation for the manufacturing systems that are linked and function within it. 

The FDA does not consider the quality system as different or separate from the five elements. In this sense, it the quality system model may be considered the root from which the five elements branch out.

In other words, the five manufacturing systems integrate themselves them into the respective and appropriate sections of the model. The order of interplay and interdependence may vary slightly from one organization to another, but to those in the knowhow of the six-system inspection approach; the rationale by which the inter-relationship plays out is quite readily apparent.

State of control –the crux of the matter

The entire purpose of having a systems approach in which the systems are independent, yet integrate into each other seamlessly is that having a systems-based inspection compliance program ensures that the organization is equipped with the ability to assess whether each of the systems is in a state of control.

 References:

http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/…/Guidances/UCM070337.pdf

Thanks & Best Regards,
John Robinson
GlobalCompliancePanel
161 Mission Falls Lane, Suite 216, Fremont, CA 94539, USA.
Web: www.globalcompliancepanel.com
Email: john.robinson@globalcompliancepanel.com

Quality by Design (QBD) and analytical methods

Quality by Design (QBD) and analytical methods have come into focus because of an inherent limitation in the guideline used for validation of analytical methods. The International Conference on Harmonization (ICH)’s Q2 guideline, Validation of Analytical Procedures: Text and Methodology serves as the guiding document for validation of analytical methods for pharmaceutical products. Since the most common approach to method validation is a one-time affair, there is need for guidance on how to implement continuous and consistent method performance.

Methods fail to perform as required or intended in the receiving laboratory because there is always the absence of an effective process for capturing and transferring the knowledge of those involved in the development. With too much emphasis on validation of the methods to meet regulatory requirements, the focus on what to do to make the process work during actual application seemed to be lost. It is to address this bottleneck that Quality by Design (QBD) and analytical methods took shape.

How do Quality by Design (QBD) and analytical methods make a difference?

QBD, in being “a systematic approach to development that begins with predefined objectives and emphasizes product and process understanding based on sound science and quality risk management”; emphasizes the importance of having predefined objectives built into the development process. An analytical method, which is an analytical procedure that includes all steps in the procedure, constitutes an important step in the QBD lifecycle approach. Together, Quality by Design (QBD) and analytical methods become an important component of the three-stage process of method validation, which are:

  • Stage one, which relates to method design
  • Stage two, which relates to method qualification, and
  • Stage three, which is about continued method verification

 Reference:

http://www.pharmtech.com/pharmtech/article/articleDetail.jsp?id=791903

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