Best Biostatistics Tips You Will Read This Year

Statistics is a useful decision making tool in the clinical research arena. When working in a field where a p-value can determine the next steps on development of a drug or procedure, it is imperative that decision makers understand the theory and application of statistics.

Many statistical softwares are now available to professionals. However, these softwares were developed for statisticians and can often be daunting to non-statisticians. How do you know if you are pressing the right key, let alone performing the best test?

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This seminar provides a non-mathematical introduction to biostatistics and is designed for non-statisticians. And it will benefit professionals who must understand and work with study design and interpretation of findings in a clinical or biotechnology setting.

The focus of the seminar is to give you the information and skills necessary to understand statistical concepts and findings as applies to clinical research, and to confidently convey the information to others.

Emphasis will be placed on the actual statistical (a) concepts, (b) application, and (c) interpretation, and not on mathematical formulas or actual data analysis. A basic understanding of statistics is desired, but not necessary.

  • Physicians
  • Clinical Research Associates
  • Clinical Project Managers/Leaders
  • Sponsors
  • Regulatory Professionals who use statistical concepts/terminology in reporting
  • Medical Writers who need to interpret statistical reports

A guide to practical Risk Management [ISO14971 and IEC62304]

Gaps, incorrect or incomplete implementation of safety functionality can delay or make the certification/approval of medical products impossible. Most activities cannot be retroactively performed since they are closely linked into the development lifecycle. Diligent, complete and correct implementation of risk management from the start of product development is therefore imperative. This course will introduce all necessary steps to design, implement and test critical medical devices in a regulatory compliant environment. This course will additionally address the software risk management and the resulting interfaces to device level risk management.

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To comprehensively summarize all risk related activities and to demonstrate the safe properties of a device the ‘Safety Case’ or ‘Assurance Case’ document is a well-established method to collect all safety related information together in one place. This documentation will most likely become mandatory for all devices (currently only required for FDA infusion pump submissions). This course will introduce the basic concepts and content of safety assurance cases and will illustrate the usefulness for internal and external review of safety related information.

Risk management with emphasis on the application of risk management principles and requirements to the medical device development cycle. Risk management has become the method of choice to ensure an effective and safety oriented device development. International consensus, reflected in globally applicable standard requirements, has led to risk management being a mandatory component of almost any activity in the medical device industry.

The course will emphasize the implementation of risk management into the development and maintenance process. It will use real-life examples and proven tips and tricks to make the application of risk management a practical and beneficial undertaking. This seminar will address the system level issues of risk management as well as the increasingly important software and usability related issues of critical systems. It will help to comply with regulatory requirements with minimized overhead and resource burden. To make the combines effort to design, implement and verify a safe device transparent the concept of an assurance case will be introduced.

The course is mainly based on international consensus requirements such as ISO14971, IEC62366 and IEC62304. It will cover European (MDD), US (FDA) and international risk management requirements from a regulatory and practitioner’s perspective.

Following personnel will benefit from the course:

  • Senior quality managers
  • Quality professionals
  • Regulatory professionals
  • Compliance professionals
  • Project managers
  • Design engineers
  • Software engineers
  • Process owners
  • Quality engineers
  • Quality auditors
  • Medical affairs
  • Legal Professionals

How the Things Will Change The Way You Approach [Phase I Gmps]

Early clinical trials are conducted to establish initial safety of a drug. The studies are generally in small number of healthy subjects and use lower doses of the drug product. Therefore, only small amounts of investigational material are required. In order to not undertake substantial costs and to reduce regulatory burden during these early stages, the FDA has established guidelines to allow early stage investigational products to be manufactured under less stringent GMPs.

This workshop will review the current regulations, guidance documents for early stage manufacturing and GMPs in detail. Regulatory strategies and logistical considerations for early development stage product, including vendor selection and management, stability, labeling, and documentation requirements will also be reviewed and explored.

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So, that you may understand differences between GMP requirements for early and later stage clinical development. Explore and discuss ways to develop and implement strategies for early GMPs for phase I clinical studies.

  • Directors
  • Managers
  • Supervisors in Regulatory Affairs
  • Manufacturing
  • Quality Assurance, and Clinical Operations

Auditing Analytical Laboratories for FDA Compliance

There are two phases to this topic. The first is auditing itself. Good audits are well structured. They must consider the reasons for the audit, the regulatory requirements, as well as the nature of the laboratory being audited. We will discuss the considerations that must be made when auditing a laboratory. The social interactions that must be expected, the nature of the regulatory requirements and the nature of work that the laboratory performs will be discussed.

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The second phase considers what must be considered during the audit itself. Audits conducted by inexperienced or ignorant auditors are often worthless, wasting the time and money of both the auditors and the laboratory being audited. Auditors who are familiar with laboratory operations are needed as it is easy to be fooled into thinking that a non-compliant laboratory is operating normally. Different types of laboratories will require different auditor/specialists. We will discuss the pitfalls that auditors can fall into, and what questions laboratories may expect to encounter.

It is necessary for a company to know if an analytical laboratory is capable of operating in compliance with GMP or other regulations. This is especially critical if the laboratory is a quality control laboratory whose test results will be used to support the release of a product to the public or to support and application for permission to market a product.  The failure of a quality control laboratory to comply with regulations can result in the failure of a request for permission to market a product or a forced recall of a marketed product.

In extreme cases a revocation of the permission to market a product may be the result. In any case the inability to conform to regulations will result in a loss of confidence in the ability of the manufacturer to produce a product that meets quality and regulatory requirements, and, in turn, lead to a refusal to purchase a product.

It is critical that the audit of the laboratory be conducted in a professional manner, as a poor audit will waste money and lead to a false confidence in the abilities of the audited laboratory whether it is internal or external to the company.

  • Potential Auditors
  • Supervisors who must initiate Audits
  • Laboratory Supervisors and Workers
  • Quality Assurance and Control Supervisors and Lead Workers
  • Supervisory Management who must select Contractors
  • Managers
  • Directors
  • Vice Presidents who Supervise Quality Assurance
  • Quality Control
  • Regulatory Affairs Groups

Top benefits from this

Facts – Until You Reach Your the New EU Medical Device Regulation

The Commission adopted a package of measures on innovation in health. The package consisted of a Communication and two regulation proposals to revise existing legislation on general medical devices and in vitro diagnostic medical devices. In particular, the Directives on active implantable medical devices (90/385/EEC) and on medical devices (93/42/EEC) are intended to be replaced by a Regulation on medical devices, while the Directive on in-vitro diagnostic medical devices (98/79/EC) is intended to be replaced by a Regulation on the same subject.

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The revisions therefore affected all kinds of medical devices including in vitro diagnostic medical devices, from home-use items like sticking plasters, pregnancy tests and contact lenses, to X-ray machines, pacemakers, breast implants, hip replacements and HIV blood tests.

This will look at what to expect when the new regulation is implemented. Including: the transition period, Effect on Notified Bodies, Impact of the MDR on Quality Management Systems (QMS), technical documentation, clinical trial requirements, UDI and combination products.

-> Because the current Directive will be significantly altered and replaced by a Regulation which is legally binding on all Member States.

  • Clinical Trial Managers
  • Regulatory Affairs
  • Medical Officers
  • The updated Regulation
  • Implementation Dates and Transition
  • Main changes and Products Affected
  • Effect on Medical Device Manufacturers

New EU Medical Device Regulation

Effectively Dealing with Harassment and Its Relationship to Discrimination, Retaliation, and Hostile Work Environments

In any case of workplace harassment, an employer’s behavior must meet a certain standard in the eyes of the law. Just posting an anti-harassment policy, while a positive step, is insufficient to prove that an employer took workplace harassment seriously.

Workplace harassment isn’t limited to sexual harassment and doesn’t preclude harassment between two people of the same gender. The harasser can be a boss, a supervisor in another department, a co-worker, or even a non employee. The victim doesn’t necessarily have to be the person being harassed; it can be anyone affected by the harassing behavior.

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Harassment can also be considered a form of employment discrimination under various federal, state and local laws. In order to be considered discrimination, the harassment must be based on some protected trait. Under federal law, those traits include race, color, national origin, gender, pregnancy, age, religion, disability, and genetic information. Many state and local governments have enacted similar anti-discrimination laws.

Retaliation claims are costly and time-consuming for employers. Missteps in handling sensitive employee issues could result in the organization writing a check with a lot of zeros.

Additionally, workplace harassment may constitute a hostile work environment. Some conduct can be so severe on its own that even one incident can create a legal claim of workplace harassment.

How companies investigate potential misconduct can affect the company’s reputation as well as its bottom line.  Because cultural and generational diversity is changing the landscape of the U.S. workforce, that diversity can become fuel for all types of litigation. Understanding how to recognize harassment and effectively conduct workplace investigations can greatly reduce the chances of an organization being sued.

An employer can avoid or reduce liability by taking appropriate preventative measures. Participants will learn the best practices employers can employ to minimize the likelihood of retaliation violations.

Employers first need to understand exactly what harassment is: unwelcome conduct from a boss, coworker, group of coworkers, vendor, or customer whose actions, communication, or behavior mocks, demeans, puts down, disparages, or ridicules an employee. Physical assaults, threats, and intimidation are severe forms of harassment and bullying.  Harassment may also include offensive jokes, name-calling, offensive nicknames, pornographic images on a laptop, and offensive pictures or objects. Interfering with an employee’s ability to do his or her work also is considered a form of harassment.

Employees can also experience harassment when they are not the target of the harasser because of the negative work environment that can develop because of the harassment. This is referred to as a hostile work environment. Additionally, workplace harassment can result in claims of discrimination and retaliation.

Employers often overlook the importance of promptly investigating complaints of harassment and taking quick and appropriate corrective action. Since an employer’s prompt and effective response to complaints can limit or eliminate its liability in a discrimination, harassment, or retaliation lawsuit, it is imperative that employers implement an effective mechanism to investigate and resolve workplace complaints.

Charges of harassment in the workplace can result in costly consequences for companies. In 2017, the EEOC handled 84,254 charges and secured more than $125 million for victims of harassment and discrimination in private, federal, state, and local government workplaces.

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Environmental, Health and Safety (EHS) Management and Audit

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An environmental, health and safety (EHS) management and audit program is now a prerequisite for organizations in various kinds of business. Allied to the emergence of and developing along with the concepts of worker safety and corporate social responsibility; the environmental, health and safety audit is today a major component of an organization. Organizations that need visibility and are desirous of earning a good name should make the environmental, health and safety management and audit a part of their culture.

The practice of companies auditing their environmental, health and safety (EHS) began in the 1970’s, almost contemporaneously with the enactment of OSHA. Around that time, the environmental issue was gaining ground in the corporate circles of the West with the governments and other agencies pitching in with their efforts to create greater awareness of the impact of business activities on the environment. As a result, the thinking that the top management of an organization needs to be viewing this issue more seriously started to develop and got ingrained over the years.

Cannot be glossed over
environmental-health-and-safety-management-and-auditAs a result of various legislations on the issue of environmental safety; the role of the Board of Governors became central in ensuring this aspect of the business. Environmental health and safety was no longer something that needed to be administered superficially, but in formal and designated ways, more specifically in the form of an audit. In order to incentivize corporate entities to implement environmental health and safety (EHS) management and audit; the trend started moving towards making these activities carry value addition to the organization.

Environmental health and safety management and audit is now a more formalized activity that needs to be carried out in a proper, set and well-defined manner. The processes that go into the EHS management and audit are clearly laid out in the form of standards such as the ISO 14001 standard, which is essentially an Environmental Management System (EMS) audit. To strengthen and enrich the audit activity and round it better; a few related and parallel standards such as the relevant parts of the 9000 family of standards, which deals with quality management, and 18000 series audits can be carried out with ease to supplement the environmental, health and safety audit.

Role of environmental health and safety (EHS) management and audit
environmental-health-and-safety-management-and-auditEnvironmental health and safety (EHS) management and audit have now evolved into being a practice that is coupled with and fused into many business-related activities. The practice now is to make an environmental health and safety management and audit an inseparable part of the Quality Management System. Environmental health and safety (EHS) management and audit audits are now a sure means to ensure that the organization has a reputation for corporate social responsibility by implementing this audit.

Aspects of an environmental health and safety management and auditThe aim of environmental health and safety management and audit is to instill the EHS right from the top management down to the line level employee. A properly carried out EHS management and audit system should ideally take these factors into consideration:

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