200+ followers. WOWWWWWW…

followed- 200

Hello Everyone,

Today we have the pleasure of celebrating the fact that we have reached the milestone of 200+ followers on WordPress. Since we started this blog, we have had such a great time connecting with everyone.  we never expected to actually to connect with other people in the blogging community.

we are so incredibly thankful for each and every one of you who follows and comments on my blog posts. Please know that!

we would continue our blogging in these areas FDA Regulation, Medical Devices, Drugs and Biologics, Healthcare Compliance, Biotechnology, Clinical Research, Laboratory Compliance, Quality Management ,HIPAA Compliance ,OSHA Compliance, Risk Management, Trade and Logistics Compliance ,Banking and Financial Services, Auditing/Accounting & Tax, Packaging and Labeling, SOX Compliance, Environmental Compliance, Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet, Geology and Mining, Human Resources Compliance, Food Safety Compliance and etc.

Get more articlehttps://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/freeresources/resource-directory

Please follow us on

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/TrainingsAtGlobalCompliancePanel

Twitter – https://twitter.com/gcpanel

LinkedIn – https://www.linkedin.com/company/10519587/admin/updates/

Export, Import and Trade Compliance Principle – an understanding

Export, import and trade compliance principle is a very important guiding standard for governing trade policies and ensuring compliance with the set national, regional and global trade norms. It helps to define an organization’s adherence to the export, import and trade compliance principle laid out by the government and also offers an understanding of the government’s outlook and stance in these matters.

There are two aspects of the export, import and trade compliance principle:

export-import-and-trade-compliance-principle
General export, import and trade compliance principles

 

As can be understood from the description of the concept of export, import and trade compliance principle; export, import and trade compliance principles laid out by the government and requiring compliance with their guidelines are fixed. Organizations cannot manipulate or tamper them. Doing so, naturally, invites penalties.

However, the export, import and trade compliance principles set out by individual companies are conditioned by their own ethics and culture. These are a reflection of how organizations carry out their export, import and trade compliance principle, something that they themselves have laid out.

export-import-and-trade-compliance-principleAdapting the right export, import and trade compliance principle and implementing it is a reflection of how well the organization understands the business and the market and how well it is able to maintain its integrity among its circles. Needless to say, an organization that says one thing and does another is seen in a negative light by its peers.

 

Organizations specialize in helping to implement export, import and trade compliance principle

 

Just as there are many organizations which are in the business of ensuring many complex fields such as governance, risk and compliance (GRC) and technology compliance; several organizations specialize in helping organizations implement both the export, import and trade compliance principle as laid out by the government, and their own export, import and trade compliance principles.

export-import-and-trade-compliance-principleWhether an organization gets its export, import and trade compliance principle implemented through an outside, third party or does it on its own; there is no escaping the fact that export, import and trade compliance principle is something that is mandatory to state and implement accordingly.

Overlaps and alignments of organizational, governmental and trade bloc requirements

export-import-and-trade-compliance-principleEven when organizations draw up their own export, import and trade compliance principle; they are bound to include the latest and relevant regulations, policies and procedures as laid out by the government. Many internal export, import and trade compliance principles and external (those prescribed and required by the government) overlap on many occasions with those of trade blocs such as the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), European Union Preferential Trade Agreement, Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), Mercosur, etc. Export, import and trade compliance principles from these different sources should align with each other.

Reasons for export, import and trade compliance principle implementation

 

The export, import and trade compliance principles laid out by respective governments are in place because of many important reasons.

 

export-import-and-trade-compliance-principle

Rural health care centers provide low-cost care

Putting an effective complaint and recall management system in place.jpg

Providing health care services in rural areas is vital to addressing health disparity needs in the United States, said Candice King, the ACORN clinic’s executive director.

To get dental services she can afford, 73-year-old Juanita Jenkins has one of her sons drive her 16 miles from her home in the Duval neighborhood in northeast Gainesville to the Alachua County Organization for Rural Needs (ACORN) Clinic in Brooker. The 32-mile round trip is worth it, she says.

Jenkins is one of thousands of people in Alachua County and surrounding counties who need the inexpensive services provided by nonprofit organizations, such as ACORN, which was established in 1974 to serve area migrant workers.

“I started coming here last year and I’ve been here to the dentist about four or five times,” said Jenkins, after getting fitted for dentures. “They take good care of you here, and I would recommend their services to anybody.”

Thursday is National Rural Health Day, created to recognize rural health workers for their efforts and their collaborations that address the unique challenges faced in rural communities.

Providing health care services in rural areas is vital to addressing health disparity needs in the United States, said Candice King, the ACORN clinic’s executive director.

ACORN has grown from a singlewide trailer on a sandy lot of land to several modular buildings that house dental, medical and administrative offices at 23320 N. State Road 235 in Brooker.

The clinic provides a range of medical, dental and mental health care services, referrals to other health services and social services and professional education and training, King said.

Like ACORN, Archer Family Healthcare, an arm of the University of Florida College of Nursing, started out in a small building before moving into a larger building to better serve its patients. According to Joan Newell-Walker, manager of the clinic, retired Dr. Dee Williams lobbied to establish the clinic after being urged to do so by Archer residents. Williams’ efforts led to the clinic opening in 2001, and it has grown from an approximately 1,000-square-foot, two-story bungalow to a more than 5,000-square-foot facility composed of six modular buildings that were built in downtown Archer in 2007.

“We have grown to accommodate approximately 5,000 patient visits annually,” Newell-Walker said.

Patients visit the Archer clinic for a variety of reasons, including chronic diseases like diabetes, hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, as well as prenatal care, medication consultations, health education and disease prevention, immunizations, physical exams and more, Newell-Walker said.

The clinic in Archer was established to meet the needs of residents who live in the rural community in southwest Alachua County who didn’t have a health care facility before the clinic opened. But it’s grown to serve patients from throughout North Central Florida, Newell-Walker said.

The clinic’s funding comes from local, state and federal sources, and it’s run by advanced registered nurse practitioners, Newell-Walker said.

The nurse practitioners provide expert care for patients and are supported by other health care professionals, including a case manager, community health nurses and a consulting physician, Newell-Walker said.

At ACORN, a wide variety of dental, medical and mental health care services are provided, including disease management education, general medical care, reduced cost X-rays, women’s health care, dental exams and X-rays, extractions, orthodontics, root canals and more.

click to continue reading

Innovation in education looks to cure doctor shortage

Business News | 20 hours ago |

Arizona has a serious doctor shortage. The state is a “Designated Health Professional Shortage Area” and according to the latest numbers from the Health Resources & Services Administration, the department that makes these designations, slightly less than half of Arizona’s primary care health professional needs are met.

Video by Jesse A. Millard

Since only 49 percent of the state’s needs are met, Arizona residents, particularly those in the rural parts of the state, are subject to long wait times for regular checkups because of the doctor shortage.

Arizona needs to add 520 physicians in order to lose its “shortage” designation. These doctors won’t appear out of thin air, but Arizona does have a great pool to reel new doctors from — its growing medical schools.

Midwestern University’s Arizona campus in Glendale sees an estimated 40 percent of its graduates residing and practicing in Arizona, says Dr. Kathleen H. Goeppinger, president and CEO of Midwestern University.

The University of Arizona College of Medicine in Phoenix offers a pipeline to local communities. The efforts include Saturday Scrubs and Summer Scrubs, where those interested in the medical field are welcomed into simulation labs to watch students care for mannequins — or faux patients. The hope is the program will spark the interest in those considering a career in the medical field.

And Mayo Clinic welcomed its first class of about 50 students to the Valley this year, making Arizona the third state to receive a Mayo Medical school, behind Minnesota and Florida.

The Mayo Clinic School of Medicine has created a curriculum that is designed to not only teach students how to do certain medical procedures, but also teach them the ins and outs of the healthcare delivery system.

“We want to prepare physicians to meet the needs and challenges of the healthcare system,” says Michele Halyard, MD, dean of the Mayo Clinic School of Medicine’s Arizona campus. “We are hoping that many of the students will wind up staying in Arizona for their residency and ultimately becoming a physician within the Arizona community.”

Class act

In late September, several medical groups in the state formed an alliance that will work to increase the number of doctors and healthcare professionals in Arizona and ease the doctor shortage.

Maricopa Integrated Health System, Creighton University School of Medicine, Dignity Health’s St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center and District Medical Group will work together as the Creighton University Arizona Health Education Alliance to expand Arizona’s offerings of healthcare education programs.

“With this alliance, we have the opportunity to continue to strengthen Arizona’s reputation as the home of some of the best medicine in the nation,” says Patty White, president and CEO of St. Joseph’s. “The affiliation will enable us to increase the numbers of doctors and other healthcare professionals who will want to make Arizona their home.”

Arizona is also on the cutting edge of medical education, training and creating doctors who will be prepared to deliver care in a modern healthcare setting.

This is being done through various medical simulation centers in the state. Simulation is still fairly new in medical training and preparation. However, many medical schools across Arizona are adopting this new practice in hopes of producing better trained physicians.

Simulation centers vary from facility to facility, but they typically involve mannequins that enable students, practitioners and residents to learn how to deal with many different aspects of medical care and treatment.

Innovation abounds

The Banner Simulation Medical Center’s 55,000-square-foot simulation center is one of the largest simulation centers in Arizona, where trainees can fully experience a hospital-like atmosphere.

The center is nestled in a decommissioned, hospital where students can immerse themselves in simulations at an intensive care unit, surgery center, operating rooms and training labs. Students learn how to take blood samples, utilize proper sanitary measures and more, says Karen Josey, senior director of simulation at Banner Health.

“Simulation is all about patient safety,” Josey says. “Simulation goes from simple training such as putting in an IV, to the more complex tasks and scenarios, such as a chest tube insertion.”

The center also offers a day in the life of a nurse, where students are assigned a number of patients that they must watch, prioritize and care for throughout the day. This is followed by hours of debriefing on what needs to be improved and what was done correctly.

The University of Arizona currently has two simulation labs. One located in Tucson — which will open in May of 2018 — and one in Phoenix.

The Phoenix simulation center consists of three wings, 14 hospital rooms, two surgical stations, nine debriefing rooms, six onsite training rooms, three scrub sinks, ultrasound machines, 3-D models of the brain and eyes and a virtual reality simulation.

All of this is in hopes of accomplishing the UA’s “mission of providing the best training to students, residents and fellows, but it also helps recruit and expand our pipeline of students who might consider entering careers in medical fields,” says Guy Reed, dean of the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix.

Midwestern University is also home to a simulation lab. Its lab is made up of 19 exam rooms and extends to seven veterinary-based exam rooms. Also, there’s an ICU, emergency/trauma room, a pediatric floor, maternal fetal simulator, operating rooms and more.

Arizona is filled with simulation labs, including two more with Mayo Clinic. Mayo’s facility contains about six fully equipped exam rooms that are identical to those in the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, and another simulation center within its hospital.

click to continue reading

Women’s Forum panel addresses women’s health, education challenges

nsWGLFNotecard-CourtesyWGLF

 

Health and education challenges that women face were the center of a panel discussion which took place Monday morning as part of the Women’s Global Leadership Forum.

Courtesy Women’s Global Leadership Forum

 

A panel addressing health and education challenges facing women took place Monday morning as part of the Women’s Global Leadership Forum. The discussion was facilitated by Rebecca Dillingham, director of the University’s Center for Global Health, and was comprised of of women who gave their global perspectives on the issues.

Newcomb Ballroom was packed with an audience that included high schoolers, University students, alumni and faculty members.

Vivian Pinn, the first full-time director of the Office of Research on Women’s Health at the National Institutes of Health, spoke briefly about being the first African-American female graduate from the University Medical School.

“I went into that first morning class in the fall of 1963 thinking that when I looked around the room and saw only white men — that the other women and people of color must just be late getting there,” Pinn said. “Then I realized that I was it. It was me and my classmates.”

Pinn said one of her main priorities she has pursued throughout her life is trying to ensure the medical world listens to women and discusses women’s health.

“I have focused on things that have been important to me my whole life,” Pinn said. “That is — What about the health of girls and women? What about girls getting careers in medicine? I couldn’t think of a better time to focus my energy on women’s health.”

The panel centralized their conversation on the importance of enabling education at a young level to facilitate greater gender equality amongst leadership roles.

Maya Ajmera, president and CEO of the Society for Science and the Public, spoke about her trip to India in which she saw train platform schools. The trip inspired her Global Fund for Children which works on behalf of vulnerable children. Ajmera said in the future she wants to focus on empowering local, grassroots organizations to enact change.

“Grassroot entrepreneurs …  They are the ones that resources really need to get put into because I think they’ve been starved,” Ajmera said. “I think they’ve been starved in this country, but I also see that starvation globally. So if we’re going to reach people, it’s through the grassroots.”

Ajmera also said one of her main priorities is to ensure that girls continue their education beyond primary school.

“We have to get the education of girls at the secondary level globally up,” Ajmera said. “The development goals of the U.N. have achieved great success in getting primary school admissions very high. But secondary school really has to be an emphasis.”

Abinet Sitotaw, a gender and nutrition advisor for nonprofit organization CARE-Ethiopia also said education was important in promoting women and girl’s empowerment. Speaking of her own personal mission and the Mandela Washington Fellowship, Sitotaw said her priorities involved getting girls into safe educational institutions.

“It’s going to be a leadership academy whereby I manage to bring a group of young girls who cannot attend secondary schools to the city,” Sitotaw said. “I want to give them a boarding school whereby they can get a state of the art education and also leadership skills.”

 

click to continue reading