Article on “A Tour of the FDA”

A tour of the FDA is something like a snapshot of what the FDA does. The importance of the FDA can never be understated: It regulates products from the proverbial pin to airplane in the food, medical devices, pharma and healthcare industries, which touch almost every aspect of American lives. The products that the FDA regulates account for about a trillion dollars, which make up about a quarter of all goods traded in the US.

So, what is a tour of the FDA like?

A tour of the FDA helps to get a broad understanding of the this regulatory body and get some idea of the various departments it has, as well as the functions of these departments. To get an understanding of what the FDA does, a reference to its mission statement could give some direction:

“(The) FDA is responsible for protecting the public health by assuring the safety, efficacy and security of human and veterinary drugs, biological products, medical devices, our nation’s food supply, cosmetics, and products that emit radiation.” This is just the opening line of the FDA’s mission statement. Reference to its other statements, which have now included a reference to containing terrorism, will serve as a good guide to a tour of the FDA. In short, the FDA regulates nearly every item used and consumed by the American public.

The history of the FDA

The legal sanction for carrying out its mission is mandated by the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act). An amazing fact that a tour of the FDA reveals is that it is one of the oldest regulatory bodies in the world, with its earliest jurisdiction having covered regulation of drugs in the year 1848. The Department of Agriculture, to which President James Polk appointed noted chemist Charles Wetherill, can be considered the earliest endeavor to regulate medical products of daily use in the US.

How is the FDA organized?

A tour of the FDA is incomplete without a reference to the way it is organized. Its structure consists of this hierarchy:

  • Office of the Commissioner
  • Office of Foods and Veterinary Medicine
  • Office of Global Regulatory Operations and Policy
  • Office of Medical Products and Tobacco
  • Office of Operations

Under these broad heads, a tour of the FDA shows the way into which it is divided into several offices and organizations. Important among these include:

  • Office of Regulatory Affairs (ORA)
  • Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN)
  • Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER)
  • Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)
  • Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH)
  • Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH)
  • National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR)

Want to know more: http://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/control/globalseminars/~product_id=900854SEMINAR?wordpress_SEO

Tips and Suggestions on interacting with FDA Officials and Premarket Approval (PMA)

Preparing premarket submissions that win regulatory approval is a complex task, even for the most seasoned professional in the medical devices industry. This is because of the highly stringent nature of the regulatory approval pathways, namely the Premarket Approval (PMA) process and FDA regulatory 510(k) clearance.

What makes preparing premarket submissions that win regulatory approval challenging? It is the fact, acknowledged by the FDA itself, that the PMA is the most stringent type of device marketing application required by the FDA. The PMA should be secured from the FDA before the company markets the medical device. The FDA gives its approval of the PMA for a Class II medical device only after it determines that all the elements necessary for assuring that the application has enough scientific confirmation that it is safe and effective for the intended uses it is going to be put to. Preparing premarket submissions thus is an onerous task by any stretch of imagination.

Another element of preparing premarket submissions that win regulatory approval

Another aspect of preparing premarket submissions is the 510 (k). The 510 (k) is essentially a kind of premarket submission that is made to the FDA to show that the device that a manufacturer intends to market is at least as effective and safe as a legally marketed device of its equivalence, already in the market, that is not subject to PMA. The FDA calls this principle the substantial equivalency (SE) and the device that is used as the reference for equivalence, the predicate device. The requirements governing SE are contained in 21 CFR 807.92(a) (3).

On top of all these, regulatory professionals have the responsibility of creating preparing premarket submissions that should not only convincingly demonstrate the ways of stating and explaining regulatory arguments for their device to the U.S. FDA reviewer for getting the approval; they should also be presentable and well-organized, without being cluttered or confusing.

Professional trainings for preparing premarket submissions that win regulatory approval

Given all these, it goes without saying that a completely thorough understanding and knowledge of the relevant U.S. FDA laws, regulations and requirements is absolutely necessary for regulatory professionals. This in-depth understanding can be had only from thorough training, which is indispensable if the medical device company is to win a clearance or approval.

The ways by which to do this is the core learning a two-day seminar from GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for the regulatory compliance areas, will impart. The Director of this seminar is Subhash Patel, a very senior regulatory professional and founder of New Jersey-based MD Reg Consulting LLC, which serves medical device industry clients in all aspects of global regulatory affairs specific to their needs.

To enroll for this highly valuable training session on how to successfully prepare 510(k)/Pre-IDE/IDE and PMA premarket submissions that secure clearances and approvals from the FDA, please register for this seminar by visiting http://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/control/globalseminars/~product_id=900778SEMINAR?wordpress_SEO . This seminar has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

The grasp needed for preparing premarket submission that win regulatory approval

At this seminar, Patel will demonstrate the grasp that regulatory professionals in the medical devices industry need for working with the FDA officials during the review and approval process of their submission. He will offer a complete understanding of the major aspects of FDA premarket submissions.

While knowledge of the regulatory process is one thing; medical device companies also need to know how to set and state regulatory arguments for their device in a most convincing manner to the FDA reviewer. This knowledge will be part of this course. In the process of explaining how to prepare premarket submissions that win regulatory approval; Patel will also offer tips and suggestions to participants on how to work effectively with the U.S. FDA officials during review and approval process of their submission.

During the course of these two days, Patel will cover the following core elements of how to prepare premarket submissions. He will explain the following:

o  History and background of U.S FDA Laws and Regulations

o  Classify Your Device

o  Choose the Correct Premarket Submission for your device

o  Compile the Appropriate Information for your Premarket Submission

o  Author and Prepare your Premarket Submission

o  Submit your Premarket Submission to the FDA

o  Interact with FDA Staff during Review and Approval

o  Complete the Establishment Registration and Device Listing

http://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/DeviceRegulationandGuidance/HowtoMarketYourDevice/PremarketSubmissions/PremarketApprovalPMA/default.htm

http://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/DeviceRegulationandGuidance/HowtoMarketYourDevice/PremarketSubmissions/PremarketNotification510k/default.htm

FDA and EU requirements on data integrity and implementation

Data integrity and its implementation in cGMP records are major requirements from the FDA. The FDA considers these as important requirements to ensure the integrity of data in these records. The FDA’s, as well as the EU’s requirements are set out for ensuring both data integrity and its implementation are set out in 21 CFR Part 11 and Annex 11 respectively.

Data integrity is part of FDA 21 CFR Part 11, which essentially deals with the veracity of electronic records and electronic signatures. It applies to records designated or set forth in Parts 210, 211 and 212 of FDA regulations. The FDA’s 21 CFR Part 11 has its counterpart in Eudralex Annex 11, which also has more or less the same intention, but varies in some ways. Both the FDA’s 21 CFR Part 11 and Annex 11 are required for medicines that are introduced into the US and European markets. Annex 11 is basically about the implementation part of cGMP records.

What is data integrity?

First, a small understanding of data integrity: The FDA defines data integrity as a state in which the data is complete, consistent and accurate. The FDA uses the acronym ALCOA to describe this quality of data: Attributable, Legible, Contemporaneously recorded, Original or a true copy, and Accurate.  The requirements set out by the FDA on data integrity are applicable to metadata and audit trails as well, as also static and dynamic data. Static data is a physical record of which a paper record is an example. By contrast, dynamic data is the kind of record in which it is possible to make some interaction between the user and the creator.

Part 11 lists out criteria that the FDA considers all these: electronic signatures, handwritten signatures and electronic records that are done on electronic records to be reliable, truthful, and generally the same as paper records and handwritten signatures that are done on paper.

Get to understand 21 CFR Part 11 and Annex 11 better

The ways of actually ensuring and implementing data integrity as set out in both FDA 21 CFR Part 11 and Annex 11 of the Eudralex will be the learning a two-day seminar from GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings in the areas of regulatory compliance, will be imparting.

At this seminar, Angela Bazigos, CEO of Touchstone Technologies Silicon Valley, and a senior Regulatory Affairs professional who carries four decades of experience in regulatory affairs, will be the Director. To enroll for this highly enriching learning session on FDA 21 CFR Part 11 and Annex 11, please register for this session by visiting http://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/control/globalseminars/~product_id=900944SEMINAR?wordpress-SEO . This seminar has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

Explaining the history of these regulations

Angela will start this seminar with an explanation of how 21 CFR Part 11 and Annex 11 evolved, which will set the background to these laws. She will explain why these two regulations are now being talked about all over again. Offering an overview and key requirements of Part 11 & Annex 11, Angela will describe how to use a Risk Based Assessment to reduce work while still achieving Data Integrity and Compliance. She will then also illustrate how the FDA & other regulatory authorities inspect computerized systems for data integrity.

During the course of this seminar, the Director will cover the following areas:

o  What is Data Integrity and how is it implemented

o  How to use Risk Based Assessments to reduce work while still achieving Data Integrity and Compliance?

o  Data Integrity Frequently Asked Questions

o  Validation Master Plan

o  Risk Based Assessment

o  Complete Validation for a System (software development lifecycle)

o  Automated Test Tools

o  Infrastructure Requirements

o  Change Control

o  SOPs.

https://www.fda.gov/downloads/drugs/guidances/ucm495891.pdf

https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?fr=11.1

http://www.pharmpro.com/blog/2011/09/how-far-does-annex-11-go-beyond-part-11

Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation

The pharmaceutical industry considers Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation to be of very high importance. In 2011, the FDA set out this guidance for the industry. as part of this guidance, called “Process Validation: General Principles and Practices”, which sets the framework for Process Validation in the pharmaceutical industry, any organization in the pharmaceutical industry has to set up a three-stage process.

These are the three stages:

I.           Process Design

II.           Process Qualification, and

III.           Continued Process Verification.

Stage 1, or what is called the Process Design stage, is the stage in which the commercial manufacturing process is defined. This definition is based on knowledge gained through development and scale-up activities.

Stage 2, called the Process Qualification, is the stage in which an evaluation is made of the process design to determine if the process is capable of reproducible commercial manufacturing.

Stage 3, the Continued Process Verification, is meant for giving ongoing assurance during routine production to ensure that the process remains in a state of control.

A seminar on the ways implementing Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation

GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for the regulatory compliance areas, will be organizing a two-day seminar in which the ways of using Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation will be taught. Richard Burdick, Emeritus Professor of Statistics, Arizona State University (ASU) and former Quality Engineering Director for Amgen, Inc., will be the Director of this seminar on applied statistics for FDA Process Validation.

In order to learn Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation in-depth, please register by visiting http://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/control/globalseminars/~product_id=900806SEMINAR?linkedin-SEO. This course has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

A detailed and methodical approach to implementing statistical methodologies

This two-day course on Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation will focus on the ways by which a systematic approach to implementing statistical methodologies into a process validation program consistent with the FDA guidance can be established.

Beginning with a primer on statistics, Dr. Burdick will explain how the methods of Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation seminar can be applied in each remaining chapter.

Dr. Burdick will next move on to explaining the two fundamental requirements for Process Validation, namely the application of statistics for setting specifications and assessing measurement systems (assays).

He well then show how to apply statistics through the three stages of process validation as defined by requirements in the process validation regulatory guidance documents.

Given that the methods taught through all these three stages are recommended by regulatory guidance documents; this seminar on Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation will provide references to the specific citations in the guidance documents.

This seminar on Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation will lead participants into ways of establishing a systematic approach to implementing statistical methodologies into a process development and validation program that is consistent with the FDA guidance.

All-round learning related to Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation

Dr. Burdick will teach participants how to:

o  Apply statistics for setting specifications

o  Assess measurement systems (assays)

o  Use Design of Experiments (DOE)

o  Develop a control plan as part of a risk management strategy, and

o  Ensure process control/capability.

All concepts at this Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation seminar are taught within the three-stage product cycle framework defined by requirements in the process validation regulatory guidance documents.

Although established for the pharmaceutical industry, this seminar on Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation also provides a useful framework for other related industries.

In this important learning on Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation; Dr. Burdick will cover the following areas:

o  Apply statistics to set specifications and validate measurement systems (assays)

o  Develop appropriate sample plans based on confidence and power

o  Implement suitable statistical methods into a process validation program for each of the three stages

o  Stage 1, Process Design: utilize risk management tools to identify and prioritize potential critical process parameters; and define critical process parameters and operating spaces for the commercial manufacturing process using design of experiments (DOE)

o  Stage 2, Process Qualification: assess scale effects while incorporating large (pilot and/or commercial) scale data; develop process performance qualification (PPQ) acceptance criteria by characterizing intra and inter-batch variability using process design data and batch homogeneity studies; and develop an appropriate sampling plan for PPQ

o  Stage 3, Continued Process Verification: develop a control plan as part of a risk management strategy; collect and analyze product and process data; and ensure your process is in (statistical) control and capable.

A Tour of the FDA 2017

Businessman uses smart watch and phone.

A tour of the FDA is something like a snapshot of what the FDA does. The importance of the FDA can never be understated: It regulates products from the proverbial pin to airplane in the food, medical devices, pharma and healthcare industries, which touch almost every aspect of American lives. The products that the FDA regulates account for about a trillion dollars, which make up about a quarter of all goods traded in the US.

So, what is a tour of the FDA like?

A tour of the FDA helps to get a broad understanding of the this regulatory body and get some idea of the various departments it has, as well as the functions of these departments. To get an understanding of what the FDA does, a reference to its mission statement could give some direction:

“(The) FDA is responsible for protecting the public health by assuring the safety, efficacy and security of human and veterinary drugs, biological products, medical devices, our nation’s food supply, cosmetics, and products that emit radiation.” This is just the opening line of the FDA’s mission statement. Reference to its other statements, which have now included a reference to containing terrorism, will serve as a good guide to a tour of the FDA. In short, the FDA regulates nearly every item used and consumed by the American public.

The history of the FDA

The legal sanction for carrying out its mission is mandated by the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act). An amazing fact that a tour of the FDA reveals is that it is one of the oldest regulatory bodies in the world, with its earliest jurisdiction having covered regulation of drugs in the year 1848. The Department of Agriculture, to which President James Polk appointed noted chemist Charles Wetherill, can be considered the earliest endeavor to regulate medical products of daily use in the US.

How is the FDA organized?

A tour of the FDA is incomplete without a reference to the way it is organized. Its structure consists of this hierarchy:

  • Office of the Commissioner
  • Office of Foods and Veterinary Medicine
  • Office of Global Regulatory Operations and Policy
  • Office of Medical Products and Tobacco
  • Office of Operations

Under these broad heads, a tour of the FDA shows the way into which it is divided into several offices and organizations. Important among these include:

  • Office of Regulatory Affairs (ORA)
  • Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN)
  • Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER)
  • Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)
  • Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH)
  • Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH)
  • National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR)

Want to know more : http://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/control/globalseminars/~product_id=900814SEMINAR?Linkedin_SEO

The FDA’s requirements for Drug Applications and Submissions

The FDA has set out requirements by which it accepts drug applications and submissions. It accepts drug applications and submissions through two formats, the New Drug Application (NDA) and Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA). The NDA and the ANDA are the mediums through which the FDA eventually approves drug applications and submissions.

The NDA process

The NDA is one the two mechanisms through which the FDA accepts drug applications and submissions. This application is available with the FDA. Any sponsor of a clinical study, be it an organization or an individual, can apply for the NDA and can submit the same, when it is convinced that it has sufficient evidence that its study meets the FDA’ requirements for marketing approval.

The way to go about filing for an NDA as part of drug applications and submissions is this:

The ANDA process

The ANDA is the other method of drug applications and submissions to the FDA. Being the counterpart of the NDA; the ANDA is the application a company makes for getting a generic drug approved by the FDA for marketing. The ANDA also has to contain the same data as contained in the NDA drug applications and submissions, but is not required to be accompanied by the data of the clinical research. It is for this reason that they are called by their name.

In place of the clinical research data, the ANDA format of drug applications and submissions has to contain evidence that the product has the ability to perform the same functions of the original drug. This is called the drug’s bioequivalent value. Like in the case of the NDA, the ANDA too is allocated a reference number as part of its drug applications and submissions.

Common factors taken into consideration

In either of these methods, the primary considerations for the FDA include the following:

  • The safety and effectiveness of the drug
  • Its ability to meet its intended use
  • Its ability of its benefits to outweigh its risks
  • The appropriateness of the drug’s planned labeling and its contents
  • The ability of the methods used in the manufacturing of the drug to meet Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)
  • The capacity of the drug to have to controls in place for maintaining its quality, purity, strength and identity

Read more : http://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/control/globalseminars/~product_id=900762SEMINAR?wordpress_seo

GlobalCompliancePanel announces Seasonal offers for Professionals with Flat 50% OFF on all Seminars

9ad816e7329ad74d53132accd3156c40

Do celebrations need a cause and a reason? Yes, and GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for the regulatory compliance areas, is having a solid cause and reason for doing so. It is celebrating the many years of its relationship with its customers spread all over the world by offering its trainings at a massive 50% discount!

Yes, that is right. GlobalCompliancePanel’s seminars will be available for a huge 50% discount till April 30. Regulatory professionals who want to augment their knowledge of regulatory compliance can now do so by paying just half the price of these trainings from GlobalCompliancePanel. All that is needed to do walk away with a rare offer such as this is to visit https://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/seminar?wordpress_SEO and use MGCP50 Promo Code.

This offer is valid till April 30, 2017. Regulatory professionals who want to take any of GlobalCompliancePanel’s trainings can book their trainings for an area of their interest by this date. From April 1 onwards, this offer will cease, meaning that the original price will apply from then.

So, why is GlobalCompliancePanel offering this discount? It is for a simple, but profound reason: It wants to thank its huge customer base for the support they have been extending to this company over the many years for which it has been in business. During the course of the 10 years for which GlobalCompliancePanel has been in business, it has trained thousands of regulatory compliance professionals from around the world.

These professionals, belonging to such varied geographies as the US and Japan and India and Canada, have been able to meet their regulatory compliance challenges on account of these trainings. These trainings are relevant, focused and valuable, and are from some of the best known regulatory compliance Experts found anywhere on this planet.

It is these trainings that have been hoping these professionals in the regulatory compliance arena gain more insights into regulations from the FDA, the EMA and other such bodies around the world. These trainings have been consistently helping them to meet these challenges, as they give them a better and sharper understanding of the implementing these requirements.

These regulatory requirements can pose hurdles to the most experienced and brightest of regulatory compliance professionals in the medical devices, pharmaceutical, life sciences and food and biologicals areas, but not to those who undertake professional trainings from GlobalCompliancePanel. GlobalCompliancePanel’s panel of experts is here to help them overcome these challenges and hurdles.

This trend has been being witnessed from the time GlobalCompliancePanel entered the line of professional trainings. Any wonder then, that no fewer than 50,000 professionals have benefited from these trainings? What could be a better way of thanking such a huge base of customers than with this offer? GlobalCompliancePanel believes that a celebration should also be useful, and this is that this offer is!

Hurry up and enroll today. Happy learning!