The importance of meeting Supplier Management criteria

The importance of meeting Supplier Management criteria

Meeting the supplier management criteria set out by the FDA, the ISO and the QSR regulations is mandatory for the regulated industries. The qualification and assessment of suppliers is binding for the regulated industries. Being in compliance with the requirements for supplier management set out by the FDA and by the ISO and QSR standards is a sure means for organizations in the regulated industries to keep the costs of noncompliance down, as well as in helping to meet customer requirements and ensure control over their suppliers and the regulations.

This requirement assumes greater significance when the fact that the suppliers are exempt from the jurisdiction of both the FDA and the Notified Bodies in the EU is taken into consideration. It is only over the organizations that use suppliers that these agencies have authority. So, it is entirely up to the organizations in the regulated industries to ensure that they meet the criteria set out in these regulations and that they conform to the supplier qualification and assessment criteria. It is entirely their responsibility to ensure that they have sufficient control over the processes that go into supplier management. The core of this arrangement between the organization and the supplier is risk management, which is a very critical mitigation tool in the supplier management system.

Expected in all stages of the QSR and ISO

The importance of meeting Supplier Management criteria1

Given that the full burden of ensuring supplier control rests on the organization; the latter has to ensure that it selects the supplier who is capable of thoroughly meeting the requirements set out by the regulatory agencies, on behalf of the organization. The supplier needs to be able to meet supplier qualification and assessment in accordance with the regulations set out by the QSR and ISO standards. However, contrary to popular belief, it is not necessary to spend a lot of money to ensure this. As many examples have shown, organizations can show compliance with ease with limited expenditure. How are they able do this?

A seminar on putting a compliant supplier management system in place

This is the essence of the learning from a two-day seminar that is being organized by GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for the areas of regulatory compliance. This seminar will impart the skill and knowledge needed for putting in place a supplier management system that is both compliant with the ISO and QSR requirements and is yet cost-effective.

Jeff Kasoff, who is Director of Regulatory Affairs at Life-Tech, Inc., will be the Director of this seminar. Jeff has spent over 30 years in quality and regulatory management, during the course of which he has implemented and overseen quality system operations and assured compliance, at all sizes of company, from startups to those with more than $100 million in revenue. Please register for this seminar by logging on to The importance of meeting Supplier Management criteria. This course has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

Complying with both QSR regulations and ISO standards

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Jeff will help participants of this seminar gain insights and knowledge of how to accomplish their supplier qualification and assessment that meet both the QSR regulations and ISO standards in a cost effective manner. In his review of the QSR and ISO requirements for supplier evaluation; Jeff will give a definition of the types of suppliers that require evaluation. He will also describe the QSR/ISO requirements for supplier assessment.

Considering the inescapable link between risk management and supplier qualification and assessment, the Director will show how to implement a risk management plan that is effective and will help participants to add value.

Discussion on the core areas of supplier management

Jeff will devote considerable attention to supplier nonconformance, a critical area of supplier management. He will put participants at ease with the ways of how and when to issue the Supplier Corrective Action Request, a highly detested action. Before it gets issued, all the options need to be exhausted. Jeff will show which these are, as well as the knack of handling supplier nonconformance adroitly. While highlighting the importance of collaboration in the approach towards suppliers; he will explain the kinds of behaviors that risk alienating or losing suppliers.

While putting in place a supplier management and system that meet all required regulations and guidance documents is imperative to all businesses; it is more so for outsourced processes such as contract manufacturing, sterilization and testing, and also for critical suppliers. By default, this system makes dependence on suppliers inevitable.

Yet, having in place a system which ensures that they have sufficient control over their suppliers, as well as to assure auditors and regulatory agencies that the product is safe and meets all the quality requirements, is a must for organizations. Jeff will show how this can be achieved. Ensuring the cost-effectiveness of the compliant supplier management program is very important. Not doing so eats into the gains of compliance and being in control. Jeff will teach ways by which this scenario can be avoided.

 

Quality by Design using Design of Experiments 2017

The Q8, which is the ICH guidance document on pharmaceutical development, requires a drug product to meet its intended product performance as well as the needs of patients. A drug product is encouraged to adapt a systematic approach for pharmaceutical development in accordance with the steps defined by Quality by Design (QbD) principles, even though the strategy may vary from company to company or from product to product.

The ICH has offered further guidance and policies for explaining the ways by which the QbD approach should be integrated into the pharmaceutical Quality System. Some of these are:

o  Process design

o  Qualification

o  Continued process verification

o  Risk management

o  Validation.

Laxity in implementation is no longer an option

Despite the issuance of guidance on implementation of these requirements; many companies have not yet implemented QbD into their Quality Systems. This will change soon, though. Regulatory agencies have been taking a serious view of non-implementation of these requirements.

The ways in which reviewers will begin to enforce the requirements from these guidance documents have been spelt out in the manual the Chemistry, Manufacturing, and Controls (CMC) reviewers in the Office of Pharmaceutical Science (OPS) released on policies and procedures (MAPP).

The zeal with which the regulatory agencies will enforce compliance with the requirements of the QbD requirements has been emphasized also by the Director of the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) at the FDA, who detailed the concept and reiterated the importance of using a QbD approach to pharmaceutical development in a paper he co-authored in The American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists in May 2014.

Understand the ways of implementing QbD

In the light of the fact that a drug product can no longer afford to relax in its adherence to steps defined by Quality by Design (QbD) principles to adapting a systematic approach for pharmaceutical development; a meaningful and educative two-day seminar from GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for the areas of regulatory compliance, will show the ways of doing this.

At this seminar, Heath Rushing, who is the cofounder of Adsurgo LLC and co-author of the book Design and Analysis of Experiments by Douglas Montgomery: A Supplement for using JMP, will be the Director. To gain complete insight into how to implement QbD, please register for this seminar by visiting Quality by Design using Design of Experiments. This seminar has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

Complete learning on QbD using DoE

The core purpose of this session is to demonstrate how to integrate those QbD principles into a pharmaceutical Quality System. Towards this end, Heath will focus on how to establish a systematic approach to pharmaceutical development that is defined by Quality-by-Design (QbD) principles using Design of Experiments (DoE).

He will also take up the application of statistics for setting specifications, assessing measurement systems (assays), developing a control plan as part of a risk management strategy, and ensuring process control/capability for detailed description. All concepts are taught within the product Quality System framework defined by requirements in regulatory guidance documents.

A systematic understanding of the process

A QbD approach for pharmaceutical development studies should include a systematic understanding of the process. It should then use this understanding to establish a control strategy as part of a comprehensive quality risk management program. This systematic understanding should include both identification of significant process parameters and determination of a functional relationship (mathematical model) linking these significant process parameters to the critical Quality Attributes (CQAs). Heath will discuss these in depth.

Despite the thrust of this seminar on the use of DoE for QbD; it will integrate multiple aspects of QbD. An understanding of the relevant applied statistics will be offered, which will help participants understand how statistics can be used to help in two foundational requirements of QbD: A) Setting specifications, and B) Analyzing measurement systems.

Important tools for facilitating understanding

This seminar will also offer tools to participants, which will help them to derive value out of their designed experiments. Generating and analyzing both screening and response surface designs for QbD studies, the ways of using this information: best practices on presentation, setting control plans, constructing control charts, and evaluating process capability are among the other constituents of this course. This course uses the point-and-click interface of JMP software for analyses.

Heath will cover the following areas at this seminar:

o  Implement QbD principles from discovery through product discontinuation

o  Apply statistics to set specifications and validate measurement systems (assays)

o  Utilize risk management tools to identify and prioritize potential Critical Process Parameters

o  Identify Critical Process Parameters and develop a functional relationship between those process parameters and your Critical-to-Quality Attributes (CQAs)

o  Establish your design space

o  Develop a control plan as part of a risk management strategy

o  Ensure your process is in (statistical) control and capable.