21 CFR PART 11: Complete Manual for Compliance Success

FDA inspectors are ever increasing the number of inspections where they include Part 11 as a part of the scope or THE scope of the inspection. The trends and reports are showing that the FDA inspectors are focusing on electronic signatures and electronic records as more and more companies are implementing systems and technologies to support these activities.
21 CFR PART 11 Complete Manual for Compliance Success

The number of warning letters is increasing proportionally and we as quality and other professionals utilizing the technology and systems to support our businesses are not ready – we are not ready to prepare and host FDA inspections when Part 11 is in scope, we are unsure how to best use and implement Audit Trails and certainly we have challenges with internal and external auditing for Part 11 compliance. This webinar address all these topics and provides you with plenty HOW TO we as auditors and inspectors increase our comfort level with the regulation, with its elements and compliance and practically implement audit system and audit trails – especially since Audit Trails play major role in Part 11 compliance – they can be your best friends and/or worst enemies at the same time.

Areas Covered in the Seminar:

  • How to Prepare and Host FDA Inspections (will cover elements and details of preparation for the inspection as well as elements of the successful practices of hosting an FDA inspection when Part 11 is in scope or the scope of the inspection. We will also cover some commonly asked questions by the inspectors and benefits of being compliant)
  • Internal and External Auditing for Part 11 Compliance (this subtopic includes all aspects of auditing for Part 11 compliance- starting at the audit program level and then going down on how to prepare for an audit to how to successfully execute the audit and follow up on the completed audit. This subtopic also includes CAPA and responses for the audit findings related to Part 11 – what to expect and handle the difference between “regular” audits and Part 11 audits. We include some of the common audit findings and common pitfalls as well as tools for a successful planning and execution of the audit.)
  • Audit Trails (includes types of audit trails, strategies for implementing complaint audit trails, proms and cons of audit trails, how to use audit trails as an audit tool during the internal and external audit as well as during the FDA inspection visit, some examples of “should” and “shouldn’t” when it comes to the audit trails and commonly asked questions related to audit trails.)
  • Overview and Understanding of the Regulation (covers topics such as introduction and development of the regulation, what to expect in the future when it comes to the regulation, options for (non)compliance, “what ifs”, as well as most impactful sections and subsections of the regulations.)
  • How Part 11 Regulation Relates to Other Regulations (this subtopic compares the Part 11 regulation with other regulations focusing on commonalities so that you and your organization can see how easy/hard is to identify gaps as well as how harvest the low hanging fruits when striving to comply with Part 11 regulation. We cover comparison with 3-4 other regulations quoting the exact subsections of each.)
  • Sample Audit Questions (throughout the material, we ensure that we present you and prepare you to deal with some commonly asked audit and inspection questions. These questions are ready-made for you to use when you and your team are conducting internal and/or external audits, but they are also ready-made for you and your team to use as you prepare to/and host FDA inspection when Part 11 in scope of the inspection. We include some of the questions in the material presentation and in addition to that we provide you with additional 30+ commonly asked questions document which you can use for your references and training purposes.)
  • Trends; Warning Letter Examples; Advantages and Challenges of the Regulation (we conducted research to bring you and your team results of inspections and audits that have been conducted in past several years. We include trends and graphs showing how and where Part 11 regulations impacts you the most, but will also show examples of the warning letters that have been issued in last several years due to lack of compliance with the Part 11 regulation. Finally, we cover and include some examples of advantages and challenges you may be benefiting from or facing to address while striving to be Part 11 compliant.)
  • More (we talk about the importance and significance of the regulation regardless if it (currently) applies to you or not. We provide examples and HOW TO so that you and your team can get most out of the materials and presentation – and to be able to use it immediately after attending this training/webinar.)

Who Will Benefit:

  • Quality Managers
  • Quality Engineers
  • Manufacturing engineers
  • CAPA investigators
  • Inspectors
  • Six Sigma specialists
  • Consultants
Speaker Profile

Jasmin NUHIC serves a major medical devices OEM as a Sr. Compliance Quality Engineer and 21 CFR Part 11 Subject Matter Expert. He also served ASQ section as a chair for two consecutive terms, has taught quality certification exam prep course, completed numerous software validations and obtained over 25 different certifications in leadership, quality, software validations, and more. Jasmin NUHIC has conducted Webinars on this and other topics with high attendance and appreciation.

How the Things Will Change The Way You Approach [Phase I Gmps]

Early clinical trials are conducted to establish initial safety of a drug. The studies are generally in small number of healthy subjects and use lower doses of the drug product. Therefore, only small amounts of investigational material are required. In order to not undertake substantial costs and to reduce regulatory burden during these early stages, the FDA has established guidelines to allow early stage investigational products to be manufactured under less stringent GMPs.

This workshop will review the current regulations, guidance documents for early stage manufacturing and GMPs in detail. Regulatory strategies and logistical considerations for early development stage product, including vendor selection and management, stability, labeling, and documentation requirements will also be reviewed and explored.

manufacturing

So, that you may understand differences between GMP requirements for early and later stage clinical development. Explore and discuss ways to develop and implement strategies for early GMPs for phase I clinical studies.

  • Directors
  • Managers
  • Supervisors in Regulatory Affairs
  • Manufacturing
  • Quality Assurance, and Clinical Operations

200+ followers. WOWWWWWW…

followed- 200

Hello Everyone,

Today we have the pleasure of celebrating the fact that we have reached the milestone of 200+ followers on WordPress. Since we started this blog, we have had such a great time connecting with everyone.  we never expected to actually to connect with other people in the blogging community.

we are so incredibly thankful for each and every one of you who follows and comments on my blog posts. Please know that!

we would continue our blogging in these areas FDA Regulation, Medical Devices, Drugs and Biologics, Healthcare Compliance, Biotechnology, Clinical Research, Laboratory Compliance, Quality Management ,HIPAA Compliance ,OSHA Compliance, Risk Management, Trade and Logistics Compliance ,Banking and Financial Services, Auditing/Accounting & Tax, Packaging and Labeling, SOX Compliance, Environmental Compliance, Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet, Geology and Mining, Human Resources Compliance, Food Safety Compliance and etc.

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What are the potential areas of risk management?

 

What are the potential areas of risk management.jpgThe most critical aspect of risk management is the identification of potential areas of risk management. This helps the organization to stay focused on the areas in which it could possibly face risks, rather than taking an aimless view and shooting about in the dark.

In a very broad sense, the potential areas of risk management include all areas of a business, because simply no area of the business is exempt from a risk. Talk about finance, and it comes with a risk. What about manufacturing? And what about operations or marketing? How about human resources? In this very expansive sense, every area or activity of the business is among the potential areas of risk management.

Potential areas of risk management could lie simply anywhere

potential-areas-of-risk-managementOn top of these potential areas of risk management that each part of the business is prone to; there are also the other industry-related risks that inhere into any business. The risks of running, say, a firecracker business, are much higher than running a grocery store. So, potential areas of risk management should ideally include a very broad discussion on every aspect of risk management.

However, when one takes an overview of the potential areas of risk management instead of trying to break down the elements of each function in which there are potential areas of risk management; one can classify these among them:

Generic risks: As we have been discussing, any business, absolutely any business, comes with some degree of risk. And, each business comes with its own generic risk, such as falling short of funding at crunch times, core people leaving the organization at important times, logistics failures at critical times, and so on.

potential-areas-of-risk-managementProduct specific risks: As the title suggests, this kind of risk is specific to the product that the business deals with. Some products come with their unique risks, and hence, this kind of risk counts among the potential areas of risk management.

People-specific risks: These can happen in a business in which much depends on a few important people. The inefficiency or departure of such people could be among the potential areas of risk management for businesses or projects that are dependent on people.

potential-areas-of-risk-managementFinancial risks: Obviously among the top potential areas of risk management; financial risks come into play when the organization is not able to meet its bottom lines due to a variety of factors. Not getting funds on time, not getting payments from customers on time, not being able to service debts are some of the factors of financial risks.

Technology risks: Technology is a high area of risk, because it keeps changing at a breakneck speed. If organizations don’t keep up with the pace, technology risks could count among potential areas of risk management.

potential-areas-of-risk-managementMarket risks: Market risks are yet another of the potential areas of risk management because most businesses are run on the assumption or speculation that a market is going to grow at a certain rate or pace. If the estimate of this market goes wrong, it affects the business negatively.

Customer risks: The ultimate decider of the business is the customer. If a customer gets irate at a bad product or service and issues bad press, it could become one of the biggest of the potential areas of risk management.

potential-areas-of-risk-managementReal estate risks: For some businesses, especially retail, the location of the business is a major factor. In many instances, the choice of location could often decide the fate of the business. Imagine setting up a high end retail store in the vicinity of a slum. Does that make sense? Yet, even if a business chooses the right location, it could sometimes be forced to relocate due to factors such as legal issues of the property, making this among the potential areas of risk management.

Finally, what needs to be said is that the list above is by no means a comprehensive one. The potential areas of risk management, as we have discussed at the beginning, are simply too many and too fluid and subjective. They could vary from market to market, product to product and business to business. A business that is perceptive about the market has to make the right assessment of the potential areas of risk management before it starts one. It should also be ready to face the potential areas of risk management if it is up against any factor that lies beyond its reach or forecast.

 

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Statins ‘should be given to children with heart risks before the age of 10’

Statins 'should be given

Statins should be given to thousands of children by the age of 10 under radical new NHS guidance.

GPs are being urged to identify those who have an inherited risk of high cholesterol, amid warnings that the vast majority of cases are going undetected.

Estimates suggest up to 260,000 people – including 50,000 children – are suffering from genetic deficts which affect the body’s ability to break down cholesterol.

New guidance from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) today says statins should be offered to such cases, to reduce their risk of heart or stroke in midlife.

Just 15 per cent of those with the condition are being treated for it, Nice said, including just 600 of 56,000 children with the genetic problem.

Family doctors are being asked to trawl records to idenitfy those with very high cholesterol levels.

Where levels of more than 9 mmol/l are found in those over 30, and those of 7.5 mmol/l are found in those under 30, high-dose statins should be offered, the NHS guidance states.

And it says gene tests should be used to find other family members – including those below the age of 10 – who are at such heightened risk that they should be put on medication.

Around 56,000 children are estimated to suffer from familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH), yet just 600 have been diagnosed, charities say.

The condition gives men a 50 per cent chance of suffering a heart attack or stroke before the age of 50, while women have a one in three chance by the age of 60.

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Orkambi Reduces Main Biomarker of CF, Vertex Says in Updated Results on Four Therapies

Orkambi Reduces

Orkambi (lumacaftor/ivacaftor) reduced levels of the main biomarker of the lung disease cystic fibrosis and improved the nutritional status of children with the condition, according to a Phase 3 clinical trial.

The results were part of a recent update that Vertex Pharmaceuticals provided on Orkambi and three of its other CF therapies, Kalydeco (ivacaftor), tezacaftor (VX-661) and VX-371.

Vertex conducted the Phase 3 trial (NCT02797132) of Orkambi to evaluate its effectiveness and safety in preschoolers with two copies of the CFTR gene’s F508del mutation. The 60 children were aged 2 to 5. Mutations of the gene cause CF by producing faulty versions of the CFTR protein.

An indication of Orkambi’s effectiveness in the trial was that it reduced the production of the children’s sweat chloride and improved their nutritional status.

A sweat test is the gold standard for diagnosing CF because people with the disease have more chloride in their sweat than those who don’t. As for nutrition, the thick mucus that CF produces in the digestive system can prevent patients from absorbing nutrients and fat properly, leading to difficulty gaining weight and slower growth. CF also produces the mucus in lungs and other organs.

The Phase 3 trial also showed that Orkambi was safe and that the children tolerated it well. Researchers reported no adverse events besides those seen in studies of patients aged 6 to 11.

Based on the promising results of the trial, Vertex plans to submit a New Drug Application on Orkambi to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration during the first quarter of 2018. It will also ask the European Medicines Agency to extend the therapy’s availability to very young children.

Another Phase 3 trial (NCT02412111) that Vertex conducted evaluated a combination of tezacaftor and Kalydeco’s ability to reduce respiratory problems in patients more than 12 years old.

The study included 151 participants at 68 sites in the United States, Canada, Australia, and the European Union. The patients had one copy of the F508del mutation and one copy of another CFTR mutation.

Eight weeks of treatment with the combo led to a negligible improvement in a measure of patients’ lung function known as forced expiratory volume in one second, or FEV1. This is the amount of air that people can forcefully blow out of their lungs in one second.

The combo did lead to a reduction in sweat chloride that was larger than Kalydeco generated alone, however.

Given the results, Vertex has decided not to continue pursuing regulatory approval for the combo. One reason is that most patients older than 12 are eligible to receive Kalydeco by itself.

The FDA is expected to make a decision by February 2018 on a related New Drug Application that Vertex has filed. That application involves using the tezacaftor-Kalydeco combo to treat patients aged 12 or older who carry two copies of an F508del mutation or one copy of an F508del mutation plus another mutation. The FDA is giving the request priority review.

European regulators are expected to decide whether to approve the combo therapy in the second half of 2018.

Vertex has completed enrolling children 12 to 24 months for another Phase 3 trial (NCT03277196) of Kalydeco. It will evaluate the therapy’s safety in children less than 2 years old with a CFTR gating mutation and an R117H mutation.

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8 Tough Questions Every CISO Should Be Ready to Answer

8 Tough Questions Every CISO Should Be Ready to Answer

When a major security incident, such as the recent massive Equifax data breach, grabs headlines, CEOs start asking more questions about data security.

See Also: Addressing the Identity Risk Factor in the Age of ‘Need It Now’

CISOs need to be thinking about their answers to critical questions the CEO is likely to pose.

Information Security Media Group asked seven security experts what questions they believe CEOs should be asking CISOs, and what information CISOs should arm themselves with to be prepared to provide answers. Following are eight questions and the experts’ suggested responses.

We have been investing in cybersecurity for a few years now. Would you say our organization is secure?

Israel Bryski, vice president, technology risk, Goldman Sachs: To pre-empt this question, the CISO should have a conversation early on with the CEO to determine the organization’s risk appetite. This will allow the CISO to align and prioritize security initiatives accordingly.

We are in the business of information and technology risk management, so the “Are we secure?” question is somewhat misguided. The question should be: “Are we managing risk according to our risk profile?” To answer this, the CISO should be able to easily demonstrate, based on a recent risk assessment, how the various cybersecurity initiatives and projects are in fact reducing risk, shrinking the attack surface of the organization and aligning the security program with the firm’s overall risk profile.

We have a board meeting next week. Can you talk about cybersecurity in a way they will understand?

Mischel Kwon, former director of US-CERT and deputy CISO for the Department of Justice; currently CEO of MKACyber: CISOs should be able to confidently say “absolutely” to this question. They should be able to speak with the board in a very businesslike way and articulate what they are doing with the company’s money and how they are protecting the company and its assets.

The key to being able to speak to the board is to base their program on a business-focused model. That business model shows their capability founded on their maturity, and that maturity is based on the probability of detecting specific types of attacks. These are the type of attacks that are most likely to happen to them, and this is the risk to the business, its goals and its reputation that these attacks bring.

Do you have enough money to do what you need to do?

Tim Youngblood, CISO, McDonald’s: Depending on where CISO sits, this can be a hairy topic. That can be a difficult conversation to say “I’m not getting enough.” It’s not easy if the CIO is in the room.

The best way to answer that is, “We may have current risks we are really well-funded to address, but there may be future risks we’ll need to fund and we still have some work to figure that piece out.”

A CEO is not going to write you a blank check. The CEO is going to look at the CFO and CIO and say, “The CISO needs money. You take it out of your budget and make it happen.” There is not an extra pot of money waiting for anyone, so making the clear case for why it is needed is key.

Is this really worth the investment?

Heath Renfrow, CISO at U.S. Army Medicine: The best thing a CISO can do when asked this question is have multiple options they can present to the CEO. Explain to them: Here’s the full issue. This is the total cost to fix this issue. This is what we believe the cost will be if this issue doesn’t go away and how much it will be should the vulnerability be exploited.

As an example, we didn’t know not know where our protected health Information and personal identifying information resided across all systems when I first got to Army Medicine. It would be a huge HIPAA concern if we got hit on that, or if there was a leak or a violation. It could have cost millions of dollars and many jobs. I tied in the overall cost and broke it down to how much it would be per end-user device to address it and it came out to be an about $3.43 per end-user device. Then I tied in all the results of HIPAA violations in the past few years and the fines associated with them. You get your senior leaders attention real quick with that approach.

Rick Howard, CSO, Palo Alto Networks, adds: Questions like this are sure to arise as corporate leadership attempts to understand the business risk associated with a cyberattack. As a result, CIO/CISOs should be prepared to explain the total cost of a potential breach. Everything from business disruption and loss of customers to consequential legal fees and remediation can rack up the bill more quickly than leadership may realize.

Read More: http://snip.ly/q0zie#https://www.bankinfosecurity.com/8-tough-questions-every-ciso-should-be-ready-to-answer-a-10357