FDA Trends for Computer System Validation (CSV) Compliance and Enforcement

The intent was to avoid creating a huge regulatory compliance cost to industry that was initially preventing companies from embracing the technology.

Implementing and following the System Development Life Cycle (SDLC) methodology is the best approach for Computer System Validation (CSV) and maintaining the system in a validated state throughout its life.

The SDLC approach takes all aspects of validation into account throughout the life of the system and protects the data that it houses through its retention period.  The data is a key asset for any FDA-regulated company and must be protected.  If data becomes invalid, based on improperly validating and maintaining the system that houses it in a validated state, the work related to the data would need to be repeated.  This could result in a devastating loss to any company’s bottom line.

We will discuss the key areas that are most important during inspection and audit, including security, data integrity, validation, training, and documentation.

The guidance was revisited for its application to the medical device industry in the 1990s, as the first issuance addressed pharmaceuticals only.  In 1997, 21 CFR Part 11 was issued to address electronic records and signatures, as many FDA-regulated organizations began seeking ways to move into a paperless environment.

This guidance has been modified over the years to make it more palatable to industry, and this includes discretionary enforcement measures, but still remains somewhat confusing.  The intent was to avoid creating a huge regulatory compliance cost to industry that was initially preventing companies from embracing the technology.

This session will provide some insight into current trends in compliance and FDA enforcement.  Some are based on technology changes, and these will continue to have an impact as new innovations come into use in the industry.  Others are based on factors including economics, social media, new diseases, politics, and a host of other influences.

Instructor:

Carolyn (McKillop) Troiano has more than 35 years of experience in the tobacco, pharmaceutical, medical device and other FDA-regulated industries. She has worked directly, or on a consulting basis, for many of the larger pharmaceutical and tobacco companies in the US and Europe, developing and executing compliance strategies and programs. Carolyn is currently active in the Association of Information Technology Professionals (AITP), and Project Management Institute (PMI) chapters in the Richmond, VA area.

  • Information Technology Analysts
  • Information Technology Managers
  • Laboratory Managers
  • Automation Analysts
  • Manufacturing Managers
  • Manufacturing Supervisors
  • Supply Chain Specialists

Here to go in details

Seminar on Validation and Troubleshooting of Pharmaceutical Water Systems

 Description:

This course is designed to provide a microbiology-focused education about all aspects of water systems and how biofilm manages to thrive there. Prior microbiological education or training, though a plus, is not a requirement because engineers and other non-biologists also need this training if they are involved with any aspect of water systems. The instructor will provide the necessary background needed to understand this very important subject matter. This understanding is essential to the proper design, validation, operation, monitoring, maintenance, troubleshooting, and excursion investigations of a high purity water system. Without this understanding, water system control consists of a set of rules that often don’t work and can cause very costly system downtime or even product recalls, and leaves the user without a clue as to what went wrong or how to effectively fix it so it doesn’t recur.

Why you Should attend:

Much fear and hype exists with pharmaceutical biofilms, especially those in water systems. Long term biofilm control cannot be achieved from a blind set of hand-me-down rules for design and operation. One must truly understand biofilm to be able to control it. And because every water system is unique, understanding how biofilm is trying to grow in your system, which could be different than any other system. This course will give you that understanding that is translatable to any system, so that uneventful microbial control is possible. Without this understanding you will quickly find that blind rules for operation (and design) eventually fail to work, and the consequences of failure will far exceed the educational costs that could have prevented it.

Who Will Benefit:

This 2-day course is particularly relevant to managers, supervisors, and operatives taking on new responsibilities related to water, but also for experienced water personnel to learn the “true” whys behind what they do and perhaps better ways of doing things. Specific positions that would benefit are:

  • Microbiology Laboratory supervisors and analysts responsible for water sampling and testing
  • Quality Assurance personnel responsible for water system deviation management and change control
  • Regulatory and Compliance professionals responsible for FDA interactions
  • Process and Utility Engineers responsible for water system maintenance, repairs, troubleshooting, and excursion mitigation
  • Facility Engineers responsible for water system design or renovation

Agenda:

Day 1 Schedule

Lecture 1:

What Makes Water Systems Have Microbial Quality Problems

  • Understand biofilm basics and how it develops
  • Understand the impact of biofilm on the commonly used purification unit operations
  • Understand how various commonly used microbial control strategies work (or don’t work) to control biofilm development
  • Understand the how, where, and why of microbial monitoring, action levels, etc.
  • Debunk a few water system myths
  • Get answers to your own water system questions

Lecture 2:

Successful Sanitization Approaches for Trouble-Free Water Quality

  • Material and construction limitations
  • Continuous vs intermittent sanitization
  • The importance of biofilm removal
  • How sanitants work (or don’t work)
  • When to sanitize
  • Troubleshooting sanitization problems

Lecture 3:

Water System Validation by Logic Instead of Tradition

  • Why validate a water system?
  • Basic ground rules for water systems before you validate them
  • Micro Test Method “validation”
  • Minimum validation expectations
  • How to figure out what you should validate
  • What happens after the honeymoon is over
  • Is validation ever really over?
  • Special considerations for lab water systems
  • Are packaged waters a viable option?

Lecture 4:

Implementing Changes to a Validated System

  • Purpose of a Change Control program – a help, not a hindrance
  • When is a change major vs minor, requiring full vs limited re-qualification?
  • What about water use during re-qualifications?
  • FDA validation expectations
  • Reliance on logic and common sense and the disservice of precedent and paradigms
  • Additional useful tips

Lecture 5:

Reducing Water Microbial Excursions & Improving Investigations

  • What are excursions?
  • Water system dilemma: process control or quality control (utility or raw material), or both
  • Intended roles of Alert/Action Levels and Specifications
  • Investigation, necessary and often fruitless
  • Excursion responses and impact
  • Criticality of valves, hoses, & outlet flushing
  • Diagnosing the source of the problem
  • Minimizing unnecessary excursion responses through best practices

Day 2 Schedule

Lecture 6:

Understanding and Controlling Endotoxin

  • Where does endotoxin come from?
  • What are the properties of endotoxin?
  • How do you get rid of it?
  • How do you detect it?
  • What assay controls are used?
  • What are the endotoxin specs for water?
  • How do you control it?

Lecture 7:

Harmonizing vs Optimizing Water Microbial Testing for System Quality Control

  • Water harmonization that has occurred
  • Water Micro TM “Dis-Harmonization”
  • A little about Biofilm
  • Biofilm diversity in water systems
  • Micro TM options and evaluation protocol
  • The good and bad of Micro harmonization
  • Where RMMs can fit in
  • Parting wisdom

Lecture 8:

Microbial Enumeration Issues with High Purity Water Systems

  • Microbial Enumeration Issues with High Purity Water Systems
  • Biofilm enumeration issues (planktonic vs surface)
  • Traditional cultivative approach issues
  • Validation of your test method
  • Alternative TM choices (advantages/disadvantages)
  • Significance of water isolates
  • Sampling issues
  • Establishing Alert/Action Levels and Water Specs and defending them to FDA

Lecture 9:

Water System Investigation “How-To’s” and Example Case Studies

  • Gathering and assessing existing data and symptoms
  • Considering user opinions
  • Investigation approach elements
  • Recognizing red herrings/false positives
  • Recognizing possible root causes
  • Water system contamination case studies
  • Parting kernels of water system wisdom

Lecture 10:

What USP Does and Doesn’t Say about PW, WFI, Pure Steam and Micro Issues

  • PW, WFI, Pure Steam micro specifications?
  • <1231> Starting water issues
  • <1231> Misunderstood issues clarified
  • <1231> Microbiological test issues clarified
  • <1231> Suggested micro test method
  • <1231> Micro Specifications
  • <1231> Alert and Action Levels and max’s
  • Recent/Upcoming USP water changes
  • Discrepancies between pharmacopeia’s

 

Speaker:

Dr Teri C. Soli

Principal Consultant, Soli Pharma Solutions

T.C. Soli is a Ph.D. Microbiologist and President of Soli Pharma Solutions, Inc. offering troubleshooting and training expertise covering water systems, sterilization, sterile and non-sterile manufacturing, microbiological laboratories, and microbial and beta-lactam contamination control. He has 38 years of pharmaceutical experience as a consultant and with operating companies including DSM Pharmaceuticals, Glaxo Wellcome, Burroughs Wellcome, and Pfizer.

His career-long water systems and contamination troubleshooting experience, coupled with water-related USP, ISPE, PhRMA, and PDA committee involvements, afford him practical knowledge about contamination control; cleaning, sterilization and process validation; and all aspects of high purity water systems.

Location:  Philadelphia, PA Date: April 23rd & 24th, 2019 and Time: 9:00 AM to 6:00 PM

Venue:  DoubleTree by Hilton Philadelphia Airport, 4509 Island Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19153

 

 

Price:

1 ATTENDEE $2,000, Register for 1 attendee

5 ATTENDEES $10,000, Register for 5 attendees

10 ATTENDEES $20,000, Register for 10 attendees

Until March 20, Early Bird Price: $2,000.00, From March 21 to April 21, Regular Price: $2,200.00

 

Sponsorship Program benefits for seminar

For More Information– 

 

Contact us today!

NetZealous LLC DBA GlobalCompliancePanel

globalcompliancepanel@gmail.com

Toll free: +1-800-447-9407

Phone: +1-510-584-9661

Website: 

 

Registration Link

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200+ followers. WOWWWWWW…

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Hello Everyone,

Today we have the pleasure of celebrating the fact that we have reached the milestone of 200+ followers on WordPress. Since we started this blog, we have had such a great time connecting with everyone.  we never expected to actually to connect with other people in the blogging community.

we are so incredibly thankful for each and every one of you who follows and comments on my blog posts. Please know that!

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Digital Marketing for Pharmaceutical companies offers tremendous opportunities

There is enormous potential for digital marketing for pharmaceutical companies. Proper exploitation of the social media can take pharmaceutical companies to their market in a more pinpointed and accurate manner than traditional marketing.

Gone are the initial days of reluctance on the part of pharmaceutical companies to embrace social media as a powerful marketing medium. That was in the past, when the concept of social media was new, and regulations in the pharmaceutical industry had yet to catch up with explosive pace at which the social media grew.

More and more pharmaceutical companies are on the social media

Today, one is likely to see any pharmaceutical company worth its name being active on YouTube, Facebook and Twitter to interact with its customers. Changes brought about by digital marketing in the pharmaceutical industry have seen companies like Johnson and Johnson and Pfizer being among the several majors associated with YouTube lately for creating and promoting their image. This is a result of the realization that social media can, far from being unconducive to the industry, can be quite amiable to it.

  • In a study in late 2014, the New England Journal of Medicine estimated that leading pharmaceutical companies spend up to a quarter of their marketing budgets on the social media
  • The study pointed out that the social media were as powerful and effective as EHRs and mobile applications as marketing tools, signaling a new dynamic for digital marketing in the pharmaceutical industry.

Social media as a key differentiator

The defining area in which the social media can be different and more effective than traditional marketing tactics for pharmaceutical companies is this: earlier methods such as trade conferences, promotions, gifting doctors for prescribing a company’s brands were effective, but were carried out outside the healthcare setting and in isolation of the patient. The reach and intervention of the social media has made digital marketing for pharmaceutical companies so much more effective that they can get right into the arena of treatment and be of assistance with valuable inputs and suggestions.

cgmpForCombinationProducts

Data Mining and Signal Detection in Pharmacovigilance

Data Mining and Signal Detection in Pharmacovigilance

A signal is described by the World Health Organization as any information that is reported on a possible or potential causal relationship between a drug and the adverse event it spawns. This relationship can be of virtually any nature, so long as it concerns the drug and the subject, and it could be either new or one with a precedent.

Data mining can be described as the method of obtaining data from target groups to help the clinical study come to important assessments and conclusions. Many a time, it is not clear whether a drug’s expected benefits outweighs the potential risks it brings about or vice versa, till the drug goes for marketing authorization. In order to assess this to the extent possible, clinical pharmacologists weigh the benefit and risk evaluation of medicines using tools such as data mining. Data mining is done both at the individual level of a subject and at the macro level of the population at large. These two methods are usually inseparable from each other, in that almost no study is done exclusively for one group.

Given its ability to help pharmacologists discern the various patterns that emerge from a clinical study; data mining is acquiring a position of importance of late and is being used in almost all stages of drug development. This could range from the earliest stage, namely drug discovery and could go up to post-marketing surveillance.

The WHO’s Uppsala Monitoring Centre

Data Mining and Signal Detection in Pharmacovigilance1

In order to make the results of very clinical study done in every part of the world accessible to everyone – a formidable task without doubt – the WHO has formulated the Uppsala Monitoring Center. This is a universal database of all the results obtained from clinical research the world over. Although voluntary and missing data from a many studies; the UMC is a comprehensive attempt at establishing a data mining and signal detection system that is accessible to everyone concerned. The UMC can thus be considered the universal data mining and signal detection database.

With over 2.5 million case reports of various clinical studies done all around the world, the UMC has evolved over time as a data mining and signal detection database. It initially started by requiring principals of clinical studies to generate new drug and Adverse Drug Reactions (ADR) combinations every three months. With the growth in the number of studies and the variety of issues they threw up; this was no longer considered feasible.

The UMC then started out to create its own method, by which the principles of making an objective initial assessment of all new drug and ADR combinations started getting implemented as they emerged. To this were added the requirements of bringing about a transparent selection of drug – ADR combinations for review, as well as suggest a quantitative aid to data mining and signal detection.

Data Mining and Signal Detection in Pharmacovigilance3

Today, the UMC uses several methodologies to carry out its task of being at the forefront of data mining and signal detection. It uses the Bayesian Confidence Propagation Neural Network, which uses Bayesian statistics within the architecture of a neural network for data mining and signal detection.

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Biotech and Pharmaceutical Courses are a gateway to a challenging and flourishing career

Biotech and Pharmaceutical Courses are a gateway to a challenging and flourishing careerWith over four million employed directly or in allied sectors and catering to the world’s largest market and research area, biotech and pharma is a fast growing industry. Its courses are designed to prepare individuals for this giant industry.

Biotech and pharmaceutical courses are much sought after by aspiring professionals in the field of biotech and pharma. This is why:

  • The US is the world’s largest market for pharmaceuticals, as well as being the world leader in biopharmaceutical research
  • Research by Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers Association (PhRMA) has revealed that the majority of the world’s research and development (R & D) in pharmaceuticals is conducted by U.S. firms
  • These firms hold the intellectual property (IP) rights on most new medicines.

Huge in every sense

Biotech and Pharmaceutical Courses2

Around 5,000 new medicines with approximately 3,400 compounds are currently being studied in the United States, the longest pipeline in any region in the world. The pharmaceutical industry employs nearly a million people and supports more than three times that number in related and supplementary industries. All these place a high demand on biotech and pharmaceutical courses.

What should those aspiring for courses look for?

Biotech and Pharmaceutical Courses4

Certification is the primary criterion to look out in those seeking a biotech and pharmaceutical courses. Whether it is classroom or online courses that are opted for; certification by a certifying authority should be the determining admission to biotech and pharmaceutical courses.

CFPIE or the Center for Professional Innovation and Education Inc., BioPharma Institute and Center for Professional Advancement (CFPA) are some of the better known providers of certified biotech and pharmaceutical courses. This is a partial list of the areas on which courses are offered by these institutes/centers:

The following tripod of software-related issues forms the IEC 62304:2006’s foundation:

biotechandPharmaceuticalCoursesThese three attributes form the backbone of the test of a medical device company’s successful compliance with the regulatory requirements. For a medical device company to be successful in applying ISO 14971:2012 and IEC 62304:2006; it has to implement a cross-standard and resourceful way of integrating activities covering these requirements documents.

 

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Thousands of drugs at risk if no Brexit deal, European pharmaceutical companies warn

Brexit threatens the free flow of these goods, given stringent medicine regulations that may require the retesting of drugs shipped across borders in the absence of an agreed trading arrangement.

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Supplies of thousands of medicines are at risk of disruption if Britain leaves the European Union without a trade deal, European pharmaceutical companies warned on Thursday. More than 2,600 drugs have some stage of manufacture in Britain and 45 million patient packs are supplied from the UK to other European countries each month, while another 37 million flow in the opposite direction. Brexit threatens the free flow of these goods, given stringent medicine regulations that may require the retesting of drugs shipped across borders in the absence of an agreed trading arrangement.

The European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations (Efpia) said a survey of its members showed 45 percent of companies expected trade delays if Britain and Europe fell back onto World Trade Organization rules after Brexit. Drugmakers also face an additional hurdle when it comes to licensing their products, since more than 12,000 medicines will require a separate UK licence in order for them to be prescribed. “For life-saving and life-improving medicines, the EU and UK cannot afford to wait any longer to ensure that the necessary cooperation on medicines is in place from the day the UK leaves the EU,” said Efpia Director General Nathalie Moll.

Pharmaceutical companies have insisted since last year’s Brexit referendum that a comprehensive agreement is needed to ensure maximum alignment between EU and British pharmaceutical regulations. But with the clock ticking down to Brexit in March 2019 with no sign yet that a trade deal will be concluded, many companies are now starting to draw up plans to protect drug supply chains, including building extra testing centres in Europe.

 

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