Want An Easy Fix For Your Good Laboratory Practices? Read This!

This does not include studies utilizing human subjects, or clinical studies, or field trials on animals.

Good Laboratory Practices (GLPs), 21 CFR part 58 are not set of guidelines but they are regulations for conducting nonclinical laboratory studies that support or are intended to support applications for research or marketing permits for products such as food and color additives, human and animal drugs, medical devices for human use, biological products and electronic products that are regulated by the FDA.

GLPs are enforceable by law. They do not include manufacturing of product. GLPS are for non-clinical laboratory studies in which tests article are studied in test system under laboratory conditions to determine their safety. This does not include studies utilizing human subjects, or clinical studies, or field trials on animals.

What are the Learning Objectives:

  • What are Good Laboratory Practices
  • Why were they created
  • What is the objective of GLPs and how are they associated with GMPs and SOPs
  • Statistical procedures for data evaluation
  • Instrumentation validation
  • Analytical and laboratory certification
  • Documentation and maintenance of records
  • Consequences of noncompliance
  • Disqualification and reinstatement

Who will Benefit:

  • Quality Assurance Personnel
  • Quality Control Personnel
  • Research and Development Personnel
  • Regulatory Affairs Personnel
  • Project Managers
  • Manufacturing Managers
  • Validation Engineers
  • Internal Auditing Personnel
  • Microbiology Personnel
  • Auditors

Please Continue for Complete Details

Good Laboratory Practices (GLPs) Comparing and Contrasting GMP

Non-clinical laboratory studies in which tests article are studied in test system under laboratory conditions to determine their safety.

To compare and contrast between Good Laboratory Practices and Good Manufacturing practices.

Good Laboratory Practices (GLPs), 21 CFR part 58 are not set of guidelines but they are regulations for conducting nonclinical laboratory studies that support or are intended to support applications for research or marketing permits for products such as food and color additives, human and animal drugs, medical devices for human use, biological products and electronic products that are regulated by the FDA.

microsoft-IoT-AI-insider-lab

GLPs are enforceable by law. They do not include manufacturing of product. GLPS are for non-clinical laboratory studies in which tests article are studied in test system under laboratory conditions to determine their safety. This does not include studies utilizing human subjects, or clinical studies, or field trials on animals.

  • What are Good Laboratory Practices
  • Why were they created
  • What is the objective of GLPs and how are they associated with GMPs and SOPs
  • Statistical procedures for data evaluation
  • Instrumentation validation
  • Analytical and laboratory certification
  • Documentation and maintenance of records
  • Consequences of noncompliance
  • Disqualification and reinstatement

Who will be benefited by this

  • Quality Assurance Personnel
  • Quality Control Personnel
  • Research and Development Personnel
  • Regulatory Affairs Personnel
  • Project Managers
  • Manufacturing Managers
  • Validation Engineers
  • Internal Auditing Personnel
  • Microbiology Personnel
  • Auditors

Instructor Joy McElroy With over 20 years total experience in the pharmaceutical and biotech industries, Joy has gained extensive knowledge of Quality Assurance, Process and Cleaning Validation, and Equipment Qualification. She has written and executed Equipment Qualification and Validation Protocols for numerous Companies such as Mallinckrodt, Wyeth Lederle, Merck, BioMerieux, Catalent, and Phillips Medisize. 

Her knowledge, experience, and strong work ethic have made her a highly sought-after engineer in both the pharmaceutical and biotech industries. Joy specializes in Equipment Qualification, Sterilization, Cleaning Validation, and GMP Compliance Auditing.

200+ followers. WOWWWWWW…

followed- 200

Hello Everyone,

Today we have the pleasure of celebrating the fact that we have reached the milestone of 200+ followers on WordPress. Since we started this blog, we have had such a great time connecting with everyone.  we never expected to actually to connect with other people in the blogging community.

we are so incredibly thankful for each and every one of you who follows and comments on my blog posts. Please know that!

we would continue our blogging in these areas FDA Regulation, Medical Devices, Drugs and Biologics, Healthcare Compliance, Biotechnology, Clinical Research, Laboratory Compliance, Quality Management ,HIPAA Compliance ,OSHA Compliance, Risk Management, Trade and Logistics Compliance ,Banking and Financial Services, Auditing/Accounting & Tax, Packaging and Labeling, SOX Compliance, Environmental Compliance, Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet, Geology and Mining, Human Resources Compliance, Food Safety Compliance and etc.

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The increasing role of the social media in healthcare

 

The increasing role of the social media in healthcare 6With the social media having moved beyond being a platform for sharing personal information; its role in healthcare has nearly exploded of late. This is mainly because the growth of the social media has more or less coincided with that of the electronic records in healthcare.

Whatever the identifiable or unidentifiable reasons for the convergence of social media in healthcare; the fact is that social media in healthcare is a major phenomenon that is here to stay.

Social media in healthcare is being analyzed for potentially huge business opportunity, and it is being taken up for serious discussion in legal circles, with the American Congress and many other legislative bodies around the world thinking of taking serious steps for regulating it.

The increasing role of the social media in healthcare 4

The most fundamental aspect of social media in healthcare is that its growth has been helped by the core feature it brings: its ease of adaption in this sector. Healthcare information, as we all know, is very vital, and speed is of great importance. This is why social media in healthcare has come to be one of the most talked about scenarios in the healthcare today, propped in no less measure by the gigantic size of the American healthcare economy.

The advantages social media brings into healthcare

 

The increasing role of the social media in healthcare 1As just seen, the social media in healthcare facilitate great use because they help transmit information at a pace that was difficult to imagine till recently. With the development of the electronic health records (EHR) in the US, technology has made possible the customization of health records. A platform like the social media can help accelerate this pace enormously. It can also help practitioners and other stakeholders of healthcare information, such as Business Associates and Covered Entities and a host of related ones gather information and transmit it and process it at lightning speed.

Concerns

The increasing role of the social media in healthcare 3

The enormous benefits that the social media bring into healthcare notwithstanding; there is room for serious concern.

Like all other technology-driven tools, the social media in healthcare comes with an inherent risk: the laxity of records. Loose or nil security or healthcare records are a serious cause for concern. The recent breaches in health data have cost many healthcare organizations in the US millions of dollars.

The social media in healthcare give an opportunity for marketers to pitch their products or services, but they also open up lots of opportunity for the unscrupulous among these to exploit and manipulate this information. This is akin to the potential drawbacks credit cards and other such facilities bring. The social media in healthcare is a tool that is open to a high degree of vulnerability to breach. This is all the more true of new technologies, such as the cloud, which the social media in healthcare have embraced with open arms.

So, while the social media in healthcare is a force to reckon with, it is not something that is totally free of drawbacks. Till regulatory action frees the sector of these, the social media in healthcare will continue to grow, albeit with its concerns.

 

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Health Education England launches online workshop on improving digital readiness

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Health Education England is launching an online workshop to gather views on digital readiness.

The organisation is working in collaboration with Digital Health and innovation and crowdsourcing agency Clever Together on the online workshop, which forms part of the Building a Digital Ready Workforce programme.

It will be launched on 22 November in partnership with BCS Health and Care, the Federation of Informatics Professionals in Health and Social Care, and the Faculty of Clinical Informatics.

James Freed, chief information officer at Health Education England, told Digital Health the exercise was a chance to gather the views of those who already have a strong voice as well as those who are less commonly heard.

“In almost all technological programmes I have seen, our efforts are mostly about technology and very little about process, and the process redesign, and almost none on people,” he explained. He hopes the new online workshop will address that.

Andy Kinnear, chair of BCS Health and Care, added the aim was to hear from “digital experts; the wider group of people involved in the digital space such as nurses, doctors and care professionals; and the entire health and social care workforce”.

The online workshop will run for about three weeks and its results will form the basis for how the BRDW programme will prioritise and invest £6m over the next four years. Its findings will be extensively covered by Digital Health.

You can register now for the online workshop. Our feature article gives more detail – including interviews with James Freed and Andy Kinnear. Keep an eye on Digital Health over the next few weeks for ongoing coverage.

Women’s Forum panel addresses women’s health, education challenges

nsWGLFNotecard-CourtesyWGLF

 

Health and education challenges that women face were the center of a panel discussion which took place Monday morning as part of the Women’s Global Leadership Forum.

Courtesy Women’s Global Leadership Forum

 

A panel addressing health and education challenges facing women took place Monday morning as part of the Women’s Global Leadership Forum. The discussion was facilitated by Rebecca Dillingham, director of the University’s Center for Global Health, and was comprised of of women who gave their global perspectives on the issues.

Newcomb Ballroom was packed with an audience that included high schoolers, University students, alumni and faculty members.

Vivian Pinn, the first full-time director of the Office of Research on Women’s Health at the National Institutes of Health, spoke briefly about being the first African-American female graduate from the University Medical School.

“I went into that first morning class in the fall of 1963 thinking that when I looked around the room and saw only white men — that the other women and people of color must just be late getting there,” Pinn said. “Then I realized that I was it. It was me and my classmates.”

Pinn said one of her main priorities she has pursued throughout her life is trying to ensure the medical world listens to women and discusses women’s health.

“I have focused on things that have been important to me my whole life,” Pinn said. “That is — What about the health of girls and women? What about girls getting careers in medicine? I couldn’t think of a better time to focus my energy on women’s health.”

The panel centralized their conversation on the importance of enabling education at a young level to facilitate greater gender equality amongst leadership roles.

Maya Ajmera, president and CEO of the Society for Science and the Public, spoke about her trip to India in which she saw train platform schools. The trip inspired her Global Fund for Children which works on behalf of vulnerable children. Ajmera said in the future she wants to focus on empowering local, grassroots organizations to enact change.

“Grassroot entrepreneurs …  They are the ones that resources really need to get put into because I think they’ve been starved,” Ajmera said. “I think they’ve been starved in this country, but I also see that starvation globally. So if we’re going to reach people, it’s through the grassroots.”

Ajmera also said one of her main priorities is to ensure that girls continue their education beyond primary school.

“We have to get the education of girls at the secondary level globally up,” Ajmera said. “The development goals of the U.N. have achieved great success in getting primary school admissions very high. But secondary school really has to be an emphasis.”

Abinet Sitotaw, a gender and nutrition advisor for nonprofit organization CARE-Ethiopia also said education was important in promoting women and girl’s empowerment. Speaking of her own personal mission and the Mandela Washington Fellowship, Sitotaw said her priorities involved getting girls into safe educational institutions.

“It’s going to be a leadership academy whereby I manage to bring a group of young girls who cannot attend secondary schools to the city,” Sitotaw said. “I want to give them a boarding school whereby they can get a state of the art education and also leadership skills.”

 

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IT’S A NO BRAINER! Action needed to stop children being exposed to chemicals that harm their brain development!

A report published today by CHEM Trust highlights how chemicals in food and consumer products used in homes, schools and offices could harm brain development in children.

The impacts – which may include ADHD and lower IQ – are avoidable and can prevent children reaching their full potential says CHEM Trust, in No Brainer: The impact of chemicals on children’s brain development: a cause for concern and a need for action.

Researchers have shown that many thousands of people have been exposed to now largely-banned chemicals such as lead and PCBs at high enough levels to have harmed their brain function. Now there is growing concern about the impacts of exposures to many of the ‘new’ chemicals in our 21st century lifestyles.

Chemicals of concern include brominated flame retardants (BFRs), a group of chemicals added to furniture, electronics and building materials, per- and poly- fluorocarbons (PFCs), used for non-stick coatings or breathable coatings in everyday products including packaging and clothes. Some chemicals in these groups are being phased out, but similar chemicals remain in everyday use.

The study also points out the unpleasant reality that children are constantly exposed to a cocktail of chemicals, which can act together, something which is still largely ignored by chemical safety laws.

CHEM Trust proposes a range of policies that could help address this challenge, for example faster regulatory action on groups of similar chemicals, and development of new methods for identifying chemicals of concern. They also include advice for consumers on how to reduce their exposure.

Dr Michael Warhurst, Executive Director of CHEM Trust, said:

“The brain development of future generations is at stake. We need EU regulators to phase out groups of chemicals of concern, rather than slowly restricting one chemical at a time. We cannot continue to gamble with our children’s health.”

The report has been peer reviewed by two eminent scientists in the field, Professor Philippe Grandjean and Professor Barbara Demeneix.

Prof Barbara Demeneix (Laboratory of Evolution of Endocrine Regulations, CNRS, Paris) said:

Chemical exposure is now at unprecedented levels, is multiple, ubiquitous, and present from conception onwards

Prof. Philippe Grandjean (Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Southern Denmark), added:

The current generation has the responsibility to safeguard the brains of the future
“I would insist that the Precautionary Principle must be applied in order to protect the next generation’s brains.”

 

Read More: http://snip.ly/maoou#http://www.chemtrust.org/brain/