Seminar Calendar of Upcoming Courses – June to July – 2017

Upcoming-Courses-for-French-Circles-Club

GlobalCompliancePanel’s seminars are a wonderful opportunity for professionals in the regulatory compliance areas to understand the latest happenings and updates in the regulatory compliance areas and to implement them, something they need to climb in their professions. GlobalCompliancePanel brings together a few of the best recognized names in the field of regulatory compliance on its panel of experts. The result: Learning that is effective, valuable and helpful.

GlobalCompliancePanel’s experts help you unravel all the knowledge you need in all the areas of regulatory compliance. At these seminars which are held all over the globe, you get to interact with them in person, so that any doubt or clarification you have is sorted out by none other than the honcho. They help professionals like you implement the regulations and stay updated, so that regulatory compliance causes no stress for you.

GlobalCompliancePanel’s experts offer their insightful analysis into the issues that are of consequence to regulatory professionals in their daily work. Their thoughts help you implement the best practices of the industry into your work. They also offer updates on the latest regulatory requirements arising out of a host of the laws and issues related to regulatory compliance, including, but not limited to medical devices, food and beverages, pharmaceuticals, life sciences, biotechnology and pharmaceutical water systems.

Take a look at our upcoming webinars from GlobalCompliancePanel, which will put you on the road to learning about any area that is of importance to your profession. You can plan your learning from GlobalCompliancePanel by looking at our seminars in the next few weeks at locations of convenience to you. You can choose from a whole range of topics. See which among these trainings suit you: Design of Experiments (DOE) for Process Development and Validation, Writing and implementing effective SOP’s, new FSMA rules, risk management and device regulations, data integrity, combination products, and what have you!

Contact us today!
NetZealous LLC DBA GlobalCompliancePanel
john.robinson@globalcompliancepanel.com
Toll free: +1-800-447-9407
FAX : 302 288 6884
Website: http://bit.ly/Courses-June-to-July-2017

Understanding the FDA’s GMP Expectations for Phase I and First-in-Man Clinical Trials

The establishment of the initial safety of a drug is the primary reason for which early clinical trials are conducted. Phase I of drug development consists of:

o  Research and drug discovery

o  Preclinical development, of which initial IND, or first in humans (also called first in man), is part

o  Clinical development, which consists of Phase I, Phase 2 and Phase 3 clinical pharmacology studies

Phase I studies are designed mainly for investigating the following qualities of an investigational drug in humans:

o  The extent to which it is safe and tolerable: (if possible, identify its Maximum Tolerated Dose (MTD)

o  Pharmacokinetics

o  Pharmacodynamics of an investigational drug in humans.

The ultimate goal of these Phase I and later studies is to ensure that the right drug is given to the right patient in the right dose, at the right time. These clinical studies are carried out to determine which dose or dosing regimen of the target drug achieves all its objectives for all the populations groups for which it is being developed.

Rationale for a small sample

Generally, these studies are carried out on a small sample of subjects of normal health. These early clinical trials normally use lower doses of the drug product. On account of this, the organization or laboratory carrying out these early stage clinical studies uses only small amounts of investigational material.

This is because of two reasons: The small sample is chosen in such a fashion that it is a representation of the whole study in relation to various parameters, and two, choosing a small sample substantially reduces the costs associated with a largescale study. It also reduces the regulatory burden during these early stages. Keeping in mind these factors, the FDA has established guidelines by which early stage investigational products can be allowed to be manufactured under less stringent GMPs.

Not meeting regulatory requirements makes the exercise futile

Without an understanding of the FDA’s guidelines for these GMPs, the whole exercise of early or Phase I studies becomes wasteful and meaningless. All along, the FDA’s guidelines have to be consistently and accurately adhered to in order to meet compliance requirements, without which the clinical trial and its results do not get approved.

What are the steps that a clinical or pharmaceutical organization need to take in order to ensure that these GMPs for Phase I clinical trials are being met? All the aspects of this topic will be covered in depth over two days of intense learning that will be imparted at a seminar from GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for the areas of regulatory compliance.

Peggy Berry, the President and CEO at Synergy Consulting where she provides consulting services to companies in all aspects of drug development, will be the Director of this seminar. All that is needed to gain from the rich wealth of Peggy’s experience is to register for this seminar by logging on to Good Manufacturing Practices . This course has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

A complete explanation of the FDA’s GMP requirements

This seminar is being organized to help participants gain an understanding of the requirements for advancing drugs from research into early clinical development and the minimum FDA requirements for Phase I GMPs. She will help them learn practical applications for implementing Phase I manufacturing strategies to meet FDA requirements.

Towards this end, Peggy will discuss these topics to lay the foundation and basis for advancing drugs into clinical development from research and providing required information to the FDA regarding these products on Day 1:

o  Moving a Product out of R&D

o  CMC Requirements for an IND Study

o  Good Manufacturing Practices: Basics for Beginners

o  Raw Material Management

Taking off from these topics, Peggy will focus on the topics relating to the requirements for early stage products of different types and for vendor selection and management on Day 2, which include:

o  GMPs for Phase I IND products

o  GMPs for Combination Products and 505(b)(2) Products

o  Process Validation for Early Stage GMP

o  Outsourcing Early Stage Manufacturing.

Tips and Suggestions on interacting with FDA Officials and Premarket Approval (PMA)

Preparing premarket submissions that win regulatory approval is a complex task, even for the most seasoned professional in the medical devices industry. This is because of the highly stringent nature of the regulatory approval pathways, namely the Premarket Approval (PMA) process and FDA regulatory 510(k) clearance.

What makes preparing premarket submissions that win regulatory approval challenging? It is the fact, acknowledged by the FDA itself, that the PMA is the most stringent type of device marketing application required by the FDA. The PMA should be secured from the FDA before the company markets the medical device. The FDA gives its approval of the PMA for a Class II medical device only after it determines that all the elements necessary for assuring that the application has enough scientific confirmation that it is safe and effective for the intended uses it is going to be put to. Preparing premarket submissions thus is an onerous task by any stretch of imagination.

Another element of preparing premarket submissions that win regulatory approval

Another aspect of preparing premarket submissions is the 510 (k). The 510 (k) is essentially a kind of premarket submission that is made to the FDA to show that the device that a manufacturer intends to market is at least as effective and safe as a legally marketed device of its equivalence, already in the market, that is not subject to PMA. The FDA calls this principle the substantial equivalency (SE) and the device that is used as the reference for equivalence, the predicate device. The requirements governing SE are contained in 21 CFR 807.92(a) (3).

On top of all these, regulatory professionals have the responsibility of creating preparing premarket submissions that should not only convincingly demonstrate the ways of stating and explaining regulatory arguments for their device to the U.S. FDA reviewer for getting the approval; they should also be presentable and well-organized, without being cluttered or confusing.

Professional trainings for preparing premarket submissions that win regulatory approval

Given all these, it goes without saying that a completely thorough understanding and knowledge of the relevant U.S. FDA laws, regulations and requirements is absolutely necessary for regulatory professionals. This in-depth understanding can be had only from thorough training, which is indispensable if the medical device company is to win a clearance or approval.

The ways by which to do this is the core learning a two-day seminar from GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for the regulatory compliance areas, will impart. The Director of this seminar is Subhash Patel, a very senior regulatory professional and founder of New Jersey-based MD Reg Consulting LLC, which serves medical device industry clients in all aspects of global regulatory affairs specific to their needs.

To enroll for this highly valuable training session on how to successfully prepare 510(k)/Pre-IDE/IDE and PMA premarket submissions that secure clearances and approvals from the FDA, please register for this seminar by visiting Tips and Suggestions on interacting with FDA Officials and Premarket Approval (PMA) . This seminar has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

The grasp needed for preparing premarket submission that win regulatory approval

At this seminar, Patel will demonstrate the grasp that regulatory professionals in the medical devices industry need for working with the FDA officials during the review and approval process of their submission. He will offer a complete understanding of the major aspects of FDA premarket submissions.

While knowledge of the regulatory process is one thing; medical device companies also need to know how to set and state regulatory arguments for their device in a most convincing manner to the FDA reviewer. This knowledge will be part of this course. In the process of explaining how to prepare premarket submissions that win regulatory approval; Patel will also offer tips and suggestions to participants on how to work effectively with the U.S. FDA officials during review and approval process of their submission.

During the course of these two days, Patel will cover the following core elements of how to prepare premarket submissions. He will explain the following:

o  History and background of U.S FDA Laws and Regulations

o  Classify Your Device

o  Choose the Correct Premarket Submission for your device

o  Compile the Appropriate Information for your Premarket Submission

o  Author and Prepare your Premarket Submission

o  Submit your Premarket Submission to the FDA

o  Interact with FDA Staff during Review and Approval

o  Complete the Establishment Registration and Device Listing

 

Article on “Statistical Sampling Plans for Medical Devices”

One of the important aspects of design control of medical devices is statistical sampling plans for medical devices. To gain an understanding of the idea of statistical sampling plans for medical devices, one needs to understand the process of medical device design controls.

Statistical sampling plans for medical devices needs to be seen in this background: Under Sec. 820.30 of Title 21 of Code of Federal Regulations (CRF) the FDA sets out requirements from medical device manufacturers -which want to market certain categories of medical devices in the US -for establishing and maintaining procedures to implements design controls into the device.

An understanding of design controls is necessary first

First of all, what are design controls? Design controls are linearly and logically described and recommended steps that manufacturers have to take for ensuring that they have developed what they meant to develop. In addition, design controls have to also be implemented to ensure that the final product is in line with the expectations and needs from the customer’s perspective.

Statistical sampling plans for medical devices come at a slightly later stage. Design controls pave way for the validation processes of design verification and design, which are done to ensure that the device design has met critical specifications or outputs and fulfill the requirements for the safety requirements, intended use, or specified application.

Verification and validation

This stage makes way for the next, which is fulfillment of design verification and validation (V&V), as required under Sec. 820.50 of 21 CFR. A core part of this code is the requirement from manufacturers for establishing and maintaining procedures to locate valid and proper statistical techniques for the process capability and product characteristics to be considered applicable. These are what constitute statistical sampling plans for medical devices

More of rule of thumb

Statistical sampling plans for medical devices need to be written and based on a well-established statistical foundation. However, the FDA does not prescribe a formal plan for writing down statistical sampling plans for medical devices. These are to be based more on rule of thumb. In other words, there are no acceptable limits violations under statistical sampling plans for medical devices. The statistical sampling plans for medical devices need to be implemented on a case-to-case basis, based on the device’s characteristics and features.

In arriving at statistical sampling plans for medical devices, the FDA sets out the following rule:

Table 1

Binomial Staged Sampling Plans

Binomial Confidence Levels

able 2

Binomial Staged Sampling Plans

Binomial Confidence Levels

ucl = Upper Confidence Level

These constitute the core guidance for statistical sampling plans for medical devices.

Learn more on this topic by visiting: Article on “Statistical Sampling Plans for Medical Devices”