Seminar Calendar of Upcoming Courses – June to July – 2017

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GlobalCompliancePanel’s seminars are a wonderful opportunity for professionals in the regulatory compliance areas to understand the latest happenings and updates in the regulatory compliance areas and to implement them, something they need to climb in their professions. GlobalCompliancePanel brings together a few of the best recognized names in the field of regulatory compliance on its panel of experts. The result: Learning that is effective, valuable and helpful.

GlobalCompliancePanel’s experts help you unravel all the knowledge you need in all the areas of regulatory compliance. At these seminars which are held all over the globe, you get to interact with them in person, so that any doubt or clarification you have is sorted out by none other than the honcho. They help professionals like you implement the regulations and stay updated, so that regulatory compliance causes no stress for you.

GlobalCompliancePanel’s experts offer their insightful analysis into the issues that are of consequence to regulatory professionals in their daily work. Their thoughts help you implement the best practices of the industry into your work. They also offer updates on the latest regulatory requirements arising out of a host of the laws and issues related to regulatory compliance, including, but not limited to medical devices, food and beverages, pharmaceuticals, life sciences, biotechnology and pharmaceutical water systems.

Take a look at our upcoming webinars from GlobalCompliancePanel, which will put you on the road to learning about any area that is of importance to your profession. You can plan your learning from GlobalCompliancePanel by looking at our seminars in the next few weeks at locations of convenience to you. You can choose from a whole range of topics. See which among these trainings suit you: Design of Experiments (DOE) for Process Development and Validation, Writing and implementing effective SOP’s, new FSMA rules, risk management and device regulations, data integrity, combination products, and what have you!

Contact us today!
NetZealous LLC DBA GlobalCompliancePanel
john.robinson@globalcompliancepanel.com
Toll free: +1-800-447-9407
FAX : 302 288 6884
Website: http://bit.ly/Courses-June-to-July-2017

Human factors as a factor in medical devices 2017

The ANSI/AAMI HE75:2009 document describes human factors as the way in which the elements of human knowledge, such as emotional, intellectual, and physical and the sensory are used to optimize the production of devices, systems, and many others concerned with them. Human factors take not only the ways in which these human elements are used to raise productions, but also the way in which the limitations of these factors come into play. It is a field that is essentially concerned about the interaction between humans and devices or machines.

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Given the nature of this description, it is not surprising that human factors are important to areas such as design and aesthetics. It is an important aspect of user interface. User interface has gained a lot of acceptability and popularity following the emergence of the field of IT, but it can be used in a number of other areas. Since there is almost no area of production or science in which the user does not come into the picture; human factors can be a major factor in creating and shaping user interface for a number of products.

A major factor in medical devices

In the area of medical devices, human factors come into play in a prominent way. Although, strictly speaking, medical devices are not products into which the aesthetics is considered critical in determining consumer behavior in the way it is for say, clothing; design is an indispensable factor. Design plays a very major role in the user interface of medical devices, because these products have to be designed to absolutely precise specifications. A small deviation or variation can cause harm to humans, given the nature of the uses of medical devices. Errors can result in major consequences for patients, and subsequently, to the organization manufacturing the devices.

When it comes to medical devices, the FDA has the primary responsibility of regulating them with the intention of ensuring their safety and effectiveness. Incorporating the principles of human factors into medical devices ensures that the product meets specification, design and quality standards and thus becomes faster and less expensive to market. On account of this, human factors are becoming part of the design and development, as well as of the supplementary aspects of medical devices, such as Instructions for Use, labeling and even training.

FDA’s regulations talk about human factors in medical devices

21 CFR 820.30 emphasizes that human factors need to be taken into consideration for the following:

–       Design input: Ensuring that the needs of the patient and any others who may use the product are taken into consideration

–       Design verification: Making sure that the criteria for performance set for the medical are being consistently met, and

–       Design validation: Ensuring that the device conform to predefined user needs as well as intended uses, as also making sure that testing is carried out to ensure this function. Software validation and risk analysis are part of this testing.

In addition, the FDA has also emphasized the area of human factors in medical devices in many guidance documents and a number of upcoming Draft Guidance documents.

Explore the area of human factors in medical devices

Curious about how human factors play a role in medical devices? Want to explore the area in-depth and stretch your knowledge and imagination of human factors in medical devices? A seminar that is being organized by GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for the areas of regulatory compliance will offer this learning.

The Director of this seminar is Virginia A. Lang, Principal and Founder HirLan, Inc. and HirLan International SA. Over the course of these two days, Virginia will cover all the important areas relating to human factors in medical devices. To enroll for this important learning session, just log on to

Human Factors and Predicate Combination Products. This course has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

A complete explanation of regulations and uses of human factors in medical devices

The core aim of this seminar is to familiarize participants with the way in which human factors can be applied into medical devices. Towards covering this, she will explain all the current and upcoming human factors requirements, using which, participants will learn how to keep costs under control and reduce the time for the manufacture and marketing of their products. Those in charge of crucial functions in medical devices, such as Quality Assurance, Regulatory Affairs, Device Engineering, Device Manufacturing and Pharma/Medical Devices will gain a great deal of learning from this seminar.

Virginia will cover the following areas at this seminar:

o  Overview of Human Factors and the FDA perspective

o  Human Factors Methods and Device Product Life Cycle

o  Human Factors and Risk Analysis & Management

o  Human Factors: What Devices Require Human Factors Evaluation and Validation?

 Human Factors and Combination Products

o  Human Factors and Combination Products Submitted in an ANDA.

The ingredients of a truly effective internal audit program

 

AFirst Sliden internal audit program of an organization’s Quality Management Systems is a core requirement from both the ISO and the FDA. At its barest, an internal audit system can be understood to be an assessment or inspection of an organization’s Quality System. Audits are a very beneficial and positive tool for continually ensuring that an organization’s internal management systems are up to the mark and keep meeting regulatory requirements on a consistent basis.

An internal audit program is the most effective and useful tool in helping an organization discover its loopholes and deficiencies in the Quality System, which is absolutely essential to help it pass regulatory hurdles. The purposes of an internal audit, as set out by ISO 9001, which describes Quality Management Systems audits, are to ensure that:

  • The Quality Systems of the organization comply with the requirements of ISO 9001 and its latest versions
  • They show compliance with the requirements of other regulatory bodies such as the FDA
  • They comply with the quality requirements the organization has
  • The organization makes effective implementation and maintenance of the QMS.

ISO 9001 does not require the internal audit procedure to be fully documented. An organization has to only, to use the ISO’s own words, “maintain an audit program” and retain the documents relating to the audit and its results and information contained in them.

Multifold benefits of auditing

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Auditing, both external and internal, bring many benefits. Besides meeting the purposes as set out by ISO 9001 and others such as the FDA; auditing helps organizations:

  • Identify the areas in which they need to make improvements
  • Apply best practice relevant to the particular industry
  • Take preventive actions that could nip potential problems in the bud
  • Ensure greater customer satisfaction.

Compliance with audit requirements is considered drudgery

Despite the noble intentions behind internal and external audits; three fourths of organizations consider audits as being very cumbersome, unpleasant and baneful. Most of them carry out audits with no conviction. They carry them out only because they have no other choice. Most businesses fail to see the value behind the efforts needed for carrying out audits that meet regulatory requirements.

Carrying out audits without any sense of purpose results in more drudgery and unpleasantness. The result of carrying out audits for the sake of it, rather than with purpose is there to see: More Warning Letters, 483’s, penalties and other actions such as even Consent Decree, from the FDA.

Learn to carry out effective audits more willingly and effectively

The ways by which organizations can overcome the mental barrier to carrying out audits and put in place a well-planned, compliant audit program that reduces the risk of noncompliance will be the teaching a two-day seminar from GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for the regulated industries, will be offering.

Susanne Manz, Quality and Compliance Expert/Auditor for Medical Devices, Manz Consulting, Inc., who is an accomplished leader in the medical device industry with emphasis on quality, compliance, and Six Sigma, will be the Director of this seminar. To enroll for this webinar and gain complete understanding of the means for planning and implementing a Quality Systems audit that meets regulatory requirements,

Please register by logging on to http://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/control/globalseminars/~product_id=900854SEMINAR?wordpress_SEO. This seminar has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

A complete understanding of the rationale and ways of carrying out compliant audits

This seminar will be highly useful in helping audit professionals in organizations devise an effective audit program with is compliant. It will put participants on the path to a thorough quality audit program that meets regulatory requirements. Such a well devised quality audit program is a powerful tool in helping organizations to understand, reduce and communicate risks relating to quality and compliance.

Susanne will open the participants’ minds to continuous improvement, which starts with the awareness of issues and opportunities. The absence of an effective audit program deprives management of an understanding of the issues within their Quality System. As a result, management is oblivious to the lacunae in the Quality System and the risk bring for the organization. Such a situation denies the management the opportunity to assess the impact a faulty Quality Management System audit has on product quality and the risk it poses to the customer. Susanne will draw participants’ attention and focus on the red-flags and explain to them the ways by which they can reduce compliance and quality risk.

This seminar will consist primarily of lectures, interactive discussions and practical exercises. Susanne will equip the participants with the tools and techniques they need for ensuring compliance of their Quality Systems audits. They will walk away with an understanding of the key concepts and their practices, along with the ways of implementing them and use them as reference for future use

 

Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation

The pharmaceutical industry considers Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation to be of very high importance. In 2011, the FDA set out this guidance for the industry. as part of this guidance, called “Process Validation: General Principles and Practices”, which sets the framework for Process Validation in the pharmaceutical industry, any organization in the pharmaceutical industry has to set up a three-stage process.

These are the three stages:

I.           Process Design

II.           Process Qualification, and

III.           Continued Process Verification.

Stage 1, or what is called the Process Design stage, is the stage in which the commercial manufacturing process is defined. This definition is based on knowledge gained through development and scale-up activities.

Stage 2, called the Process Qualification, is the stage in which an evaluation is made of the process design to determine if the process is capable of reproducible commercial manufacturing.

Stage 3, the Continued Process Verification, is meant for giving ongoing assurance during routine production to ensure that the process remains in a state of control.

A seminar on the ways implementing Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation

GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for the regulatory compliance areas, will be organizing a two-day seminar in which the ways of using Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation will be taught. Richard Burdick, Emeritus Professor of Statistics, Arizona State University (ASU) and former Quality Engineering Director for Amgen, Inc., will be the Director of this seminar on applied statistics for FDA Process Validation.

In order to learn Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation in-depth, please register by visiting Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation. This course has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

A detailed and methodical approach to implementing statistical methodologies

This two-day course on Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation will focus on the ways by which a systematic approach to implementing statistical methodologies into a process validation program consistent with the FDA guidance can be established.

Beginning with a primer on statistics, Dr. Burdick will explain how the methods of Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation seminar can be applied in each remaining chapter.

Dr. Burdick will next move on to explaining the two fundamental requirements for Process Validation, namely the application of statistics for setting specifications and assessing measurement systems (assays).

He well then show how to apply statistics through the three stages of process validation as defined by requirements in the process validation regulatory guidance documents.

Given that the methods taught through all these three stages are recommended by regulatory guidance documents; this seminar on Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation will provide references to the specific citations in the guidance documents.

This seminar on Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation will lead participants into ways of establishing a systematic approach to implementing statistical methodologies into a process development and validation program that is consistent with the FDA guidance.

All-round learning related to Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation

Dr. Burdick will teach participants how to:

o  Apply statistics for setting specifications

o  Assess measurement systems (assays)

o  Use Design of Experiments (DOE)

o  Develop a control plan as part of a risk management strategy, and

o  Ensure process control/capability.

All concepts at this Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation seminar are taught within the three-stage product cycle framework defined by requirements in the process validation regulatory guidance documents.

Although established for the pharmaceutical industry, this seminar on Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation also provides a useful framework for other related industries.

In this important learning on Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation; Dr. Burdick will cover the following areas:

o  Apply statistics to set specifications and validate measurement systems (assays)

o  Develop appropriate sample plans based on confidence and power

o  Implement suitable statistical methods into a process validation program for each of the three stages

o  Stage 1, Process Design: utilize risk management tools to identify and prioritize potential critical process parameters; and define critical process parameters and operating spaces for the commercial manufacturing process using design of experiments (DOE)

o  Stage 2, Process Qualification: assess scale effects while incorporating large (pilot and/or commercial) scale data; develop process performance qualification (PPQ) acceptance criteria by characterizing intra and inter-batch variability using process design data and batch homogeneity studies; and develop an appropriate sampling plan for PPQ

o  Stage 3, Continued Process Verification: develop a control plan as part of a risk management strategy; collect and analyze product and process data; and ensure your process is in (statistical) control and capable.

A Tour of the FDA 2017

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A tour of the FDA is something like a snapshot of what the FDA does. The importance of the FDA can never be understated: It regulates products from the proverbial pin to airplane in the food, medical devices, pharma and healthcare industries, which touch almost every aspect of American lives. The products that the FDA regulates account for about a trillion dollars, which make up about a quarter of all goods traded in the US.

So, what is a tour of the FDA like?

A tour of the FDA helps to get a broad understanding of the this regulatory body and get some idea of the various departments it has, as well as the functions of these departments. To get an understanding of what the FDA does, a reference to its mission statement could give some direction:

“(The) FDA is responsible for protecting the public health by assuring the safety, efficacy and security of human and veterinary drugs, biological products, medical devices, our nation’s food supply, cosmetics, and products that emit radiation.” This is just the opening line of the FDA’s mission statement. Reference to its other statements, which have now included a reference to containing terrorism, will serve as a good guide to a tour of the FDA. In short, the FDA regulates nearly every item used and consumed by the American public.

The history of the FDA

The legal sanction for carrying out its mission is mandated by the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act). An amazing fact that a tour of the FDA reveals is that it is one of the oldest regulatory bodies in the world, with its earliest jurisdiction having covered regulation of drugs in the year 1848. The Department of Agriculture, to which President James Polk appointed noted chemist Charles Wetherill, can be considered the earliest endeavor to regulate medical products of daily use in the US.

How is the FDA organized?

A tour of the FDA is incomplete without a reference to the way it is organized. Its structure consists of this hierarchy:

  • Office of the Commissioner
  • Office of Foods and Veterinary Medicine
  • Office of Global Regulatory Operations and Policy
  • Office of Medical Products and Tobacco
  • Office of Operations

Under these broad heads, a tour of the FDA shows the way into which it is divided into several offices and organizations. Important among these include:

  • Office of Regulatory Affairs (ORA)
  • Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN)
  • Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER)
  • Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)
  • Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH)
  • Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH)
  • National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR)

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New FDA FSMA Rules on the Sanitary Transportation of Human and Animal Foods and adherence to them

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is in the process of finalising food safety rules. A major part of these rules is devoted to the ways by which to ensure scientific and safe transportation and logistics food transportation. The FDA is required to establish rules for that improve, audit and enforce new rules relating to food transportation. This is something required by the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), under congressional instructions.

Many aspects of food transportation come under the ambit of these new FSMA Rules. These include:

–       Foods not completely enclosed by a container

–       Prevention and reduction in adulteration and risk

–       Personnel training and certification for this purpose

–       Inspecting food and collecting data

–       Maintaining compliance and reporting about its evidence.

How to do this right?

Comprehension of all the FDA FSMA Rules on the Sanitary Transportation of Human and Animal Foods is necessary and important for organizations that work in food transportation. They also need to know how to implement these rules. It is this understanding that GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance, will offer at a seminar it is organizing.

The Director of this two-day seminar is John Ryan, President, TransCert, QualityInFoodSafety, RyanSystems. To gain insights into how to understand all the aspects of the FDA FSMA Rules on the Sanitary Transportation of Human and Animal Foods and to understand how to comply with them, just register for this session by visiting http://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/control/globalseminars/~product_id=900810?wordpress-SEO . This seminar has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion

At this seminar, the Director will arm participants with an understanding of the legal requirements of food transportation and how to develop a company plan that meets the expectations and requirements of both its customers and the FDA. Also offered is total understanding and review of the ways of establishing the right temperature monitoring, sanitation, container test and traceability, training and data reporting procedures.

Technological aspects of FDA FSMA Rules on the Sanitary Transportation of Human and Animal Foods

Technological aspects of food transportation are gaining importance. These include new low cost GPS enabled traceability and temperature monitoring technology, EPA approved container sanitizers, washout technologies, temperature maintenance equipment, and food residue and bio-contaminant testing. FDA FSMA Rules on the Sanitary Transportation of Human and Animal Foods have a close relationship with these. The Director of this seminar will take these up for examination.

In reviewing the future of transportation food safety in the light of new and evolving technologies; the Director will dot the seminar with references to upcoming technology providers and provide Internet links to detailed information on the same.

This seminar is immensely useful for food supply chain logistics and food safety and security personnel whose primary responsibilities include management, sanitation, quality and operations. Those involved with handling incoming and outgoing food shipments, maintaining transportation equipment and tools, and purchasing or selling will also derive high value out of this seminar.

Article on FDA 21 CFR Part 11 Compliance

FDA-regulated industries electronic signatures and other records are considered authentic. From 2007, a strong body of opinion has emerged challenging the stringency of these requirements, but nothing major has been diluted from these.

The regulations under FDA 21 CFR Part 11 Compliance set out criteria that the Food and Drug Agency (FDA) considers in order to deem electronic signatures authentic. The electronic records, electronic signatures, and handwritten signatures executed to electronic records of several FDA 21 CFR Part 11 Compliance sets out benchmarks by which FDA-regulated industries have to be compliant with the standards set out in FDA 21 CFR Part 11 Compliance to prove that these are authentic, safe and trustworthy. The operative factor is that the FDA has to consider these signatures as being on par with those done on paper.

Which industries are included in FDA 21 CFR Part 11 Compliance?

FDA 21 CFR Part 11 Compliance applies to nearly all FDA-regulated industries, including but not restricted to:

  • Medical device manufacturers
  • Drug makers
  • CROs
  • Biotech companies, and
  • Biologics developers

The Aim of FDA 21 CFR Part 11 Compliance

The aim of FDA 21 CFR Part 11 Compliance is to ensure that specified FDA-regulated industries such as those mentioned above (with specific exceptions) implement controls -which could include audits, audit trails, documentation, system validations, and electronic signatures -for software and systems involved in processing electronic data that are:

  • Required to be maintained by the FDA predicate rules or
  • Used to demonstrate compliance to a predicate rule. The FDA describes a predicate rule as any requirement set forth in the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, the Public Health Service Act, or any FDA regulation other than Part 11. FDA 21 CFR Part 11 Compliance also applies to submissions made to the FDA in electronic format, such as a new drug application.

Which industries are exempt from FDA 21 CFR Part 11 Compliance?

Interestingly, exceptions are allowed within the same industry, based on the format of filing. For example, while FDA 21 CFR Part 11 Compliance applies to submissions made to the FDA in electronic format; it does not apply to a paper submission for the same made in electronic format, such as fax.

Also, FDA 21 CFR Part 11 compliance is not required for record retention for trace backs by food manufacturers. Similar to the logic used in the mode of filing as noted above; most food manufacturers are not otherwise explicitly required to keep detailed records, but when organizations keep electronic documentation for HACCP and similar requirements; this documentation must meet these requirements.

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