Screen-free coding for kids : mTiny robot review

They do not want to watch their mother botch sandwich making because of their bad directions.

My five- and seven-year-old constantly fight over who gets the iPad first. We have one, and they get to use it in tiny doses, usually when I’m at my wit’s end. Their favorite app? ScratchJr, MIT’s go-to coding tool for kids. They like to code. No. They love to code, like the good little 21st-century humanoids they are.

They love coding so much and I am so unwilling to give them their own devices that I decided to try something new. It’s also something that sounds so counterintuitive it actually might work: screen-free coding.

With the latest studies presenting a pretty damning picture of screen time’s effects on children’s development, I’m delighted to hear that screen-free coding is all the rage now. It is exactly what it sounds like: a way to explore the key concepts of coding sans screen. At its core, coding is simply giving a set of specific directions to someone or something to produce a desired result. Nothing in that definition demands a screen.

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It is about computational thinking though and the ability to identify and solve problems by breaking the problem and solution into workable chunks. You could teach your kid computational-thinking strategies by asking them to tell you how to make a peanut butter sandwich and it meets the screen-free requirement.

While my kids may want to consume peanut butter sandwiches while they code, hearing that they’re “coding” by telling me how to make them wouldn’t go over well. They want to turn ScratchJr purple and make him curse and jump. They want some form of pixels and plastic to beep and whir and zing. They do not want to watch their mother botch sandwich making because of their bad directions.

Enter mTiny, Makeblock’s cube-shaped robot for the preschool set. It’s cute. It’s fun. It talks. It twirls and giggles and sings. It’s screen-free but uses the same graphics found in ScratchJr in the form of coded cards.

In addition to the USB-rechargeable mTiny robot — with cute panda ears and tail — the kit comes with 36 coding-instruction cards, which are essentially cardboard versions of the ScratchJr graphics. To build codable scenes for mTiny to navigate, Makeblock includes 24 themed, reversible map blocks that kids put together like jigsaw pieces.

More read via https://www.engadget.com/2019/11/17/mtiny-screen-free-coding-robot-review-stem-toy/

How Artificial Intelligence is transforming logistics sector

The Logistics sector has always been one of the most growing sectors and a laggard in the adoption of technology.

The Logistics sector has always been one of the most growing sectors and a laggard in the adoption of technology. But the advent of latest technologies like IoT, Artificial Intelligence (AI), and Machine Learning (ML) have set this sector on a path, which is soon going to not just transform the sector but also will give rise to a whole new breed of paradigms. Now, as the demand for logistics companies is growing, the driver’s safety has become a primary concern.

With the apps like fleet management system (FMS), it is possible to observe driver’s behaviour in real-time and make a training plan which can also solve the issue of employee’s long driving hours and breaks between drives with fully automated fleets. The availability of sensors and Bluetooth wireless technologies in the trucks have made it easier to add trucks to this burgeoning online network of supply chain data, providing last-mile visibility that was previously unattainable.

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Logistics companies are using GPS systems and AI to track the location of their trucks, they can now set up geofences to enable alerts when a truck is nearing its destination, danger, optimise routes using real-time traffic data, improve vehicle utilisation, and automatically track driver hours and fuel tax reporting information. A user-generated input via smartphones is sent onto the drivers which helps them to know the route around construction or congested areas. So that they can avoid these routes and take an alternative route.

Firms have started using this technology for Fuel optimisation, Operational Planning & allocation based on Geospatial & status data, dynamic route management and control. In situations like human errors, traffic or accidents, AI predicts decisions based on data analysis and help to avoid accidents and maintain their safety.

Full Post you can read Via https://www.financialexpress.com/industry/technology/how-artificial-intelligence-is-transforming-logistics-sector/1765595/

Growth and Forecasting for next Upcoming Year Until 2025

Trending factors that will influence the progress of the Global Artificial Intelligence in Diabetes Management Market.

Artificial Intelligence in Diabetes Management Market 2019 research report presents analysis of market size, share, and growth, trends, cost structure, statistical and comprehensive data of the global market. The Market report offers noteworthy data regarding industry’s growth parameters, the current state of the market in terms of analysis of possible economic situations and macroeconomic analysis. This report features competitive scenarios from the recent technology and provides a comprehensive analysis of key growth strategies adopted by key players.

The report has been accumulated through meticulous primary and secondary research, which encompasses interviews, inspections, and observations of experienced analysts, as well as proven paid sources, news articles, annual reports, trade journals, and company body databases. The study also presents a qualitative and quantitative evaluation by analyzing the data collected from industry professionals and market participants across crucial factors in the industry’s value chain. These segments are studied in detail for the market estimates and forecasts at regional and country level.

This report focuses on the Artificial Intelligence in Diabetes Management Market outlook, future outlook, growth opportunities and core and core contacts. The purpose of the study is to present market developments in the US, Europe and other countries. It also analyzes industrial development trends and marketing channels. Industry analysis was conducted to investigate the impact of various factors and to understand the overall appeal of the industry.

Reasons for buying this report:

  • It offers an analysis of changing competitive scenario.
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A detailed outline of the Global Artificial Intelligence in Diabetes Management Market includes a comprehensive analysis of different verticals of businesses. North America, Latin America, Asia-Pacific, Africa, and Europe have been considered for the studies on the basis of several terminologies.

To know more https://tinyurl.com/ye572xqv

FDA Trends for Computer System Validation (CSV) Compliance and Enforcement

The main reason for which many companies were reluctant to adapt the technology.

The FDA has set out requirements for validating all computer systems that handle data regulated by it. These should be in accordance with its guidance on computerized systems, first issued in 1983. The main points of this guidance continue to be consistent today, even with all the changes that technological developments have brought in.

The 1990’s was a decade in which this guidance was revisited for its relevance to the medical device industry. This was because the first issuance was limited to pharmaceuticals.  In 1997, in the context of the move of many FDA-regulated organizations to move into a paperless environment, the FDA issued 21 CFR Part 11, which sought to address electronic records and signatures.

A few changes, such as discretionary enforcement measures, have been brought into this guidance from then, to fashion it to the needs of the industry. Yet, this issuance is rather confusing, although it was intended to help the industry avoid creating a huge regulatory compliance cost, which was the main reason for which many companies were reluctant to adapt the technology.

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What are the current trends in compliance and FDA enforcement?  Technology is a major basis for these trends, although there are other that are based on economics, social media, new diseases, politics, and many other influences.

All these will be discussed in detail at a six-hour learning session from GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional training for all the areas of regulatory compliance.  Carolyn Troiano, a senior compliance professional who has worked in the tobacco, pharmaceutical, medical device and other FDA-regulated industries, will be the expert at this webinar, which is being organized on October 28.

Please visit https://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/virtual-seminar/6-hour-virtual-seminar-on-fda-trends-for-computer-system-validation-(csv)-compliance-and-enforcement-10310LIVE to enroll for this valuable learning.

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Everything that is required to protect the validity of data that is regulated by the FDA and is stored in electronic format in computer systems will be explained at this webinar. The expert will describe the ways by which to properly validate an FDA-regulated computer system so that security is ensured and data integrity objectives are met.

It is accepted that implementation and adaptation of the System Development Life Cycle (SDLC) methodology is the ideal approach for Computer System Validation (CSV) and for maintaining the system in a validated state throughout its life. Carolyn will explain this aspect in detail at this webinar.

She will also discuss the key areas that are most important during inspection and audit, including security, data integrity, validation, training, and documentation.

The following areas will be explained at this webinar:

Session 1 (90 Mins):

  • FDA Regulatory Oversight
  • Computer System Validation (CSV)
  • System Development Life Cycle (SDLC) Methodology

Session 2 (90 Mins):

  • GAMP 5 Software Categorization
  • System Risk Assessment

Session 3 (90 Mins):

  • Requirements
  • Design
  • Testing
  • Requirements Traceability Matrix (RTM)
  • Additional Validation Documentation

Session 4 (90 Mins):

  • FDA Inspection Trends
  • Regulatory Influences
  • Response to Change

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About the speaker: During the over 35 years she has served in the tobacco, pharmaceutical, medical device and other FDA-regulated industries, Carolyn Troiano has worked directly, or on a consulting basis, for many of the larger pharmaceutical and tobacco companies in the US and Europe, developing and executing compliance strategies and programs.

She developed validation programs and strategies back in the mid-1980s, when the first FDA guidebook was published on the subject, and also collaborated with FDA and other industry representatives on 21 CFR Part 11, the FDA’s electronic record/electronic signature regulation.

Facial Recognition Technology in Public Housing Prompts Backlash

The federal government does not regulate facial recognition software in any way, and HUD officials say they have no plans to create any regulations.

This year in Detroit, crews working for the city’s public housing authority cut down a row of bushy trees that had shaded the entryways to two public housing units known as Sheridan I and II.

Their aim: to give newly installed security cameras an unobstructed view of the hulking, gray edifices, so round-the-clock video footage could be made available to the Detroit Police Department and its new facial recognition software whenever the Detroit Public Housing Commission files a police report.

“I think that police departments won’t make frivolous claims based solely on technology,” said Sandra Henriquez, the commission’s executive director. She added, “I think that they will use the technology as one tool that they use in bringing people into the criminal justice system.”

To critics of the widening reach of facial recognition software, such assurances are likely to ring hollow. As the software improves and as the price drops, the technology is becoming ubiquitous — on wearable police cameras, in private home security systems and at sporting events. Landlords are considering the technology as a replacement for their tenants’ key fobs, a visual check-in that could double as a general surveillance system.

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But the backlash has already begun. San Francisco; Somerville, Mass.; and Oakland, Calif., all banned facial recognition software this year. And Congress is taking a look, worried that an unproven technology will ensnare innocent people while diminishing privacy rights.

“We can’t continue to expand the footprint of a technology and the reach of it when there are no guardrails for these emerging technologies to protect civil rights,” said Representative Ayanna S. Pressley, Democrat of Massachusetts, and a sponsor of the No Biometric Barriers to Housing Act, which would ban facial recognition systems in federally funded public housing. It would also require that the Department of Housing and Urban Development send to Congress a detailed report on the software.

At this point, the federal government does not regulate facial recognition software in any way, and HUD officials say they have no plans to create any regulations.

But the technology’s spread is raising serious concerns — on the political right as well as the left. The Chinese government’s use of a vast, secret system of advanced facial recognition technology to track and control its Uighur Muslim minority has set off international outrage. It has also demonstrated how functional the technology has become.

In one month this year, law enforcement in the central Chinese city of Sanmenxia, along the Yellow River, screened images of residents 500,000 times to determine if they were Uighurs.

More read at https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/24/us/politics/facial-recognition-technology-housing.html

Robotic surgeons set to spark ‘revolution in healthcare’

The robots have four flexible joints like a human arm and are controlled by a surgeon using a joystick and a 3D screen.

Specialists working on patients while controlling automated arms could turn into another standard in medical clinics.

The help of robots in careful rooms are anticipated to change the manner in which activities are performed by enabling medical procedures to be done as keyhole techniques.

As the utilization of mechanical medical procedure turns out to be progressively well known, an expanding number of surgeons are being prepared in how to utilize them. They enable specialists to perform complex strategies utilizing an insignificantly obtrusive methodology.

Expert colorectal specialist Jonathan Morton is among a bunch of doctors who have evaluated the hardware.

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He said: “It’s quite exciting to see robotic techniques rolled out – from an ergonomic point of view, the system is set up better so that the stresses on the body are less, reducing injury rates for surgeons.

“It’s not actually the robot doing the surgery – it’s the surgeon with the experience and the knowledge telling the robot what to do, effectively it’s the same as keyhole surgery with robotics.”

The robots have four flexible joints like a human arm and are controlled by a surgeon using a joystick and a 3D screen. The technology is capable of carrying out a wide range of tasks.

CMR Surgical, the company behind the robot, claims the technology will revolutionise healthcare.

The firm’s chief medical officer, Mark Slack, said: “The vision we have is that we have built a system to enable many more patients to get MAS (minimal access surgery) and all the benefits that that brings for them – like reduced complications, reduced pain – and the aim is to put these in as many hospitals as we can.”

The NHS is developing a £50m framework for robotic surgical equipment, soon to be rolled out across the country.

So does the future of surgical procedures rest in non-human hands?

Richard Kerr, of The Royal College of Surgeons (RCS), believes it’s poised to change the nature of surgery forever.

“The robots are not going to be taking over what surgeons do. They will become an integral part of the tools surgeon use to carryout operations on their patients,” he said.

“Maybe in the long-distance future some aspects of surgery may potentially be delivered by robots.”

The RCS says a majority of NHS trusts have guidelines which surgeons are expected to follow when using robotics

More at https://news.sky.com/story/robotic-surgeons-set-to-spark-revolution-in-healthcare-11810158

GlobalCompliancePanel to organize two-day seminar on “FDA and U.S. Customs Import Rules and Export Traps in 2020”

This plan seeks to reward importers who demonstrate a level of confidence about the quality of food they import by establishing an FDA-supervised, fee-based program.

GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional training for all the areas of regulatory compliance, is organizing a two-day, in person, live seminar on the topic, “FDA and U.S. Customs Import Rules and Export Traps in 2020”, on December 4 and 5.

Casper Uldriks, an ex-FDA Expert and former Associate Center Director of CDRH, will be the Director of this seminar. Please enroll for this session by visiting https://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/seminar/tougher-import-rules-for-FDA-901966SEMINAR

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Smarter, more sophisticated, more agile and more demanding. These are what the FDA and the Customs and Border Patrol Service (CBP) have become of late when it comes to their expectations and requirements from importing firms of the submission of information and adherence to government procedures. Firms that fail to properly execute an import and export program can expect the FDA and the CBP to delay, detain or refuse their shipments.

The new Automated Commercial Environment (ACE) computer program from the CBP has brought in many changes to the process of import logistics and information reporting for FDA regulated products. As a result, companies that do not comply with the requirements set out in the ACE program can experience one of the worst nightmares they can think of: having their shipment stopped before it is even loaded at the foreign port! And then, if they refuse to or fail to use the ACE program, such ships also carry a fine of up to $10,000 for every offense.

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There is more: such companies whose products the FDA detains face a cumbersome, long winding and expensive legal process. The FDA expects companies to have the import coding information accurate and up-to-date. Any company that lacks a thorough and clear understanding of the automated and human review process are almost certain to have their shipments detained.

And then, what happens in a scenario in which the FDA decides that importers should bring the products back to the port of entry after they received a release but cannot locate the product that has been sold? Well, in such instances, such companies are slapped a fine that is three times the value of the shipment, not to speak of the additional adverse legal concerns and strategies that come along.

What do all these mean? Simple: if you are an importer, you are doomed if you fail to comply with the FDA’s guidelines on imports.

Yet, there is a way out of this quagmire, in the form of the Voluntary Qualification Importer Program, which the FDA is implementing under the FDA Food Safety and Modernization Act. This plan seeks to reward importers who demonstrate a level of confidence about the quality of food they import by establishing an FDA-supervised, fee-based program. What this program does is that it facilitates the review and importation of foods from importers who establish a higher level of control over the safety and supply chain aspects of the imported food items.

And then, there is also the extra perk that the FDA offers: its export certificates. Offered at a reasonable fee; these certificates can go a long way in giving an importer a competitive advantage in foreign markets. In fact, a few foreign governments make an FDA export certificate a requirement.

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The aim of this seminar is to offer learning on all these core areas of the FDA and US Customs Import Rules in 2020. The Director will explain how to deal with common problems, such as returns for repair, importing QC samples, and investigational products. The learning will be taught over the following agenda:

Day 1 Schedule

Lecture 1:

FDA Legal Authority Customs and Border Control (CBP) Import Process FDA Import Process Registration and documentation

Lecture 2:

FDA Import Process (continued)

  • Import Brokers
  • Prior Notice Information
  • CBP and FDA computer programs
  • Import Codes
  • Bonds and Bonded Warehouses
  • FDA “Notice of Action”

Lecture 3:

Import Delays Import Alerts Detention Refusals

Day 2 Schedule

Lecture 1:

Foreign Inspections FDA 483 – Inspectional Observations

Lecture 2:

FDA Warning Letters and Automatic detention

Lecture 3:

Import Hypothetical FDA Import for Export Program FDA Export Program Export Hypothetical

Lecture 4:

FDA Export Program Special Import Issues

  • Trade Shows
  • Personal Use
  • Compassionate Use

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https://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/GuidanceDocumentsRegulatoryInformation/ucm448728.htm