Quality by Design using Design of Experiments 2017

The Q8, which is the ICH guidance document on pharmaceutical development, requires a drug product to meet its intended product performance as well as the needs of patients. A drug product is encouraged to adapt a systematic approach for pharmaceutical development in accordance with the steps defined by Quality by Design (QbD) principles, even though the strategy may vary from company to company or from product to product.

The ICH has offered further guidance and policies for explaining the ways by which the QbD approach should be integrated into the pharmaceutical Quality System. Some of these are:

o  Process design

o  Qualification

o  Continued process verification

o  Risk management

o  Validation.

Laxity in implementation is no longer an option

Despite the issuance of guidance on implementation of these requirements; many companies have not yet implemented QbD into their Quality Systems. This will change soon, though. Regulatory agencies have been taking a serious view of non-implementation of these requirements.

The ways in which reviewers will begin to enforce the requirements from these guidance documents have been spelt out in the manual the Chemistry, Manufacturing, and Controls (CMC) reviewers in the Office of Pharmaceutical Science (OPS) released on policies and procedures (MAPP).

The zeal with which the regulatory agencies will enforce compliance with the requirements of the QbD requirements has been emphasized also by the Director of the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) at the FDA, who detailed the concept and reiterated the importance of using a QbD approach to pharmaceutical development in a paper he co-authored in The American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists in May 2014.

Understand the ways of implementing QbD

In the light of the fact that a drug product can no longer afford to relax in its adherence to steps defined by Quality by Design (QbD) principles to adapting a systematic approach for pharmaceutical development; a meaningful and educative two-day seminar from GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for the areas of regulatory compliance, will show the ways of doing this.

At this seminar, Heath Rushing, who is the cofounder of Adsurgo LLC and co-author of the book Design and Analysis of Experiments by Douglas Montgomery: A Supplement for using JMP, will be the Director. To gain complete insight into how to implement QbD, please register for this seminar by visiting Quality by Design using Design of Experiments. This seminar has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

Complete learning on QbD using DoE

The core purpose of this session is to demonstrate how to integrate those QbD principles into a pharmaceutical Quality System. Towards this end, Heath will focus on how to establish a systematic approach to pharmaceutical development that is defined by Quality-by-Design (QbD) principles using Design of Experiments (DoE).

He will also take up the application of statistics for setting specifications, assessing measurement systems (assays), developing a control plan as part of a risk management strategy, and ensuring process control/capability for detailed description. All concepts are taught within the product Quality System framework defined by requirements in regulatory guidance documents.

A systematic understanding of the process

A QbD approach for pharmaceutical development studies should include a systematic understanding of the process. It should then use this understanding to establish a control strategy as part of a comprehensive quality risk management program. This systematic understanding should include both identification of significant process parameters and determination of a functional relationship (mathematical model) linking these significant process parameters to the critical Quality Attributes (CQAs). Heath will discuss these in depth.

Despite the thrust of this seminar on the use of DoE for QbD; it will integrate multiple aspects of QbD. An understanding of the relevant applied statistics will be offered, which will help participants understand how statistics can be used to help in two foundational requirements of QbD: A) Setting specifications, and B) Analyzing measurement systems.

Important tools for facilitating understanding

This seminar will also offer tools to participants, which will help them to derive value out of their designed experiments. Generating and analyzing both screening and response surface designs for QbD studies, the ways of using this information: best practices on presentation, setting control plans, constructing control charts, and evaluating process capability are among the other constituents of this course. This course uses the point-and-click interface of JMP software for analyses.

Heath will cover the following areas at this seminar:

o  Implement QbD principles from discovery through product discontinuation

o  Apply statistics to set specifications and validate measurement systems (assays)

o  Utilize risk management tools to identify and prioritize potential Critical Process Parameters

o  Identify Critical Process Parameters and develop a functional relationship between those process parameters and your Critical-to-Quality Attributes (CQAs)

o  Establish your design space

o  Develop a control plan as part of a risk management strategy

o  Ensure your process is in (statistical) control and capable.

Marketing and promotion of drugs and medical devices

Regulation of the promotional aspects of prescription drugs, biologics, medical devices and biotechnology products with the intention of ensuring that the information contained in the promotion material is not false or misleading is one of the chief objectives of the FDA.

The FDA regulates the promotional materials of all drugs, and this includes both labeling and advertisements. Brochures, booklets, detailing pieces, bulletins, calendars, motion pictures and slides are some of the examples of labeling, while materials published in journals, magazines, other periodicals, and newspapers, and advertisements broadcast through media such as radio, television and telephone communications systems are examples of advertising.

The FDA also regulates another avenue of drug promotion and advertising, namely detailing. This kind of promotion is the one that pharma companies do to doctors in a variety of venues such as medical offices, hospitals, pharmacies, at medical meetings and symposia, academic settings, conferences and other meeting facilities.

The FDA’s reach in monitoring and regulating promotions also covers direct-to-consumer (DTC) prescription drug advertising. In this area, it has complete jurisdiction over prescription drug labeling and advertising and all medical device labeling, but has limited jurisdiction over medical device advertising.

Severe penalties for offenders

For decades, the FDA has been regulating traditional advertising, during the course of which it has been publishing several kinds of guidance documents for industry, and has issued many violation letters. The corrective actions that companies have to implement if the FDA adjudges that drug or medical device promotional material is false or misleading or does not give a proper account of the product needed to enable consumers to weigh the benefits and risks are very expensive and time consuming. They have to carry out expensive remedial advertising, have to cough up huge fines, and also face the prospect of having their reputation sullied on account of these enforcement actions from the FDA.

In addition, it can also criminally prosecute relevant executives of such organizations under the provisions of a strict liability standard. This law gives the government sweeping powers, by which it is not obliged or required to show that the executive facing prosecution had the intention of violating FDA regulations or was knowledgeable about such violations.

The agency has already netted billions of dollars in fines, forfeitures and disgorgements from drug companies for the alleged marketing of a product for unapproved, or “off-label,” uses.

Are the FDA’s laws obsolete?

Yet, the general consensus is that the law governing drug and device marketing is both outmoded and insufficient to deal with the speed at which technology-enabled promotion campaigns appear out of nowhere and disappear in a jiffy. Experts feel that the FDA is still very conservative and traditional in adapting technologies needed for detecting and nailing down such promotion campaigns that technology has brought about. Naturally, the regulatory circles are eager to see how the FDA will deal with the advanced communication technology that goes into promotion campaigns that can make the advertisement go viral and leave the scene just as quickly.

These are important aspects for organizations in the drugs, biologics, medical devices and biotechnology areas. These companies need to be completely aware of the law governing advertising and need to understand the FDA’s thinking on what it considers false and misleading advertising. This knowledge is absolutely essential, considering the broad sweep of powers that the FDA has.

Important learning on the FDA’s approach to promotions and advertising

This important understanding will be imparted at a two-day seminar that is being organized by GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for the areas of regulatory compliance. At this seminar, David R. Dills, Global Regulatory Affairs and Compliance Consultant, who provides regulatory affairs and compliance consultative services, will be the Director. To gain insights into the FDA’s thinking on how it perceives advertisements and promotions as false and misleading, please register for this seminar by visiting Marketing and promotion of drugs and medical devices. This seminar has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

Advertising aimed at healthcare professionals and consumers

Prescription drug promotion is aimed at and delivered to two distinct audiences: Health care professionals (HCPs) and consumers. The FDA recognizes that promotional efforts can provide these audiences important information about the newest developments in drug therapies. So, it insists that such information has to have integrity and completeness.

Also, healthcare professionals, sales representatives and consumers use the social media to discuss the use of prescription products for specific diseases and conditions, a factor that has to be taken into account. David will discuss this and the potential concerns it carries.