200+ followers. WOWWWWWW…

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Hello Everyone,

Today we have the pleasure of celebrating the fact that we have reached the milestone of 200+ followers on WordPress. Since we started this blog, we have had such a great time connecting with everyone.  we never expected to actually to connect with other people in the blogging community.

we are so incredibly thankful for each and every one of you who follows and comments on my blog posts. Please know that!

we would continue our blogging in these areas FDA Regulation, Medical Devices, Drugs and Biologics, Healthcare Compliance, Biotechnology, Clinical Research, Laboratory Compliance, Quality Management ,HIPAA Compliance ,OSHA Compliance, Risk Management, Trade and Logistics Compliance ,Banking and Financial Services, Auditing/Accounting & Tax, Packaging and Labeling, SOX Compliance, Environmental Compliance, Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet, Geology and Mining, Human Resources Compliance, Food Safety Compliance and etc.

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Effective Complaint Handling Guidelines serve as a basis for improvements in medical devices

Effective Complaint Handling Guidelines serve as a basis for improvements in medical devices1Far from being frowned upon, complaints should serve as an opportunity for medical device manufacturers to understand the customer’s expectations better and lead to improvements in the product quality.

The FDA describes a complaint as “any written, electronic, or oral communication that alleges deficiencies related to the identity, quality, durability, reliability, safety, effectiveness, or performance of a device after it is released for distribution”.

FDA’s complaint handling guidelines are critical for ensuring that an organization maintains safety with regard to the medical devices they manufacture. Errors in medical devices can result in complaints, and improper handling of complaints can lead to problems for the patient, ranging from injury to fatality.

It is to prevent these problems that the FDA has issued complaint handling guidelines. FDA’s thinking is based on the reasoning that a complaint may be an indicator of serious safety, but implementing effective complaint handling guidelines can greatly mollify the gravity of the issue. It is also the first step to initiating new product development, which in turn has the potential to greatly reduce risks associated with noncompliance.

Regulations in place

Provisions relating to effective complaint handling provisions are contained in FDA 21 CFR Part 820 and GxP regulations.

Firstly, these complaint handling guidelines require medical device manufacturers to maintain complaint files. Manufacturers have to make this the first step towards establishing a sustainable complaint management system.

Secondly, Section 198 of Part 820 warrants the following:

effectiveComplaintHandlingGuidelinesThirdly, FDA 21 CFR Part 820 requires the manufacturer to establish and maintain procedures for the receipt, review, and evaluation of complaints.

What should records of investigation contain?

Records of investigation should contain the following:

  • Identifiers related to the device and reported event
  • If Medical Device Reporting is made, it should investigate the following:
    • Whether there were any specifications the device failed to meet
    • Whether it was for treatment or for diagnosis that the device was being used
    • In what way the device was related to the reported event, if applicable

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Design Control for Medical Devices

Design Control for Medical Devices 3

Design Control for medical devices is of utmost importance to the medical device industry. In order to get a grasp of its importance, one needs to get an understanding of what Design Control is. In simple terms, Design Control for medical devices is a set of logical and linear steps that medical device manufacturers have to take to ensure that:

  1. The medical device being manufactured is safe
  2. The medical device manufacturer follows all the steps and procedures for ensuring that the device it develops is what was meant to be developed
  3. Design controls for medical devices have to be put in place to ensure that the final product – the medical device – meets all the required and prescribed regulatory procedures and guidelines and meets the customer’s expectation

In short and simple terms, design controls for medical devices are verifiable and provable assurances that medical device manufacturers have taken adequate steps to guarantee that a medical device meets its set of required standards and procedures to ensure its safety and meet customer requirements.

FDA and ISO expectations of design controls for medical devicesBoth the FDA and the ISO have regulatory requirements from medical devices that expect some Design Control standards. The FDA’s requirements for design controls for medical devices are spelt out in FDA 21 CFR 820.30, while ISO 13485 is the standard for design controls for medical devices. Although formed by different regulatory or standards bodies; both the FDA 21 CFR 820.30 and the ISO 13485 are essentially similar. Their purview of the areas of design controls for medical devices is almost identically similar to each other. Sections of the FDA 21 CFR 820.30 and the ISO 13485 speak of requirements relating to the following in their various sections:

In just one area of design controls for medical devices, namely Design History File, there is a small difference, in that while the FDA’s regulatory requirements for design controls for medical devices include DHF; in the case of the ISO 13485, this is treated separately.

There is thus near total convergence between the FDA 21 CFR 820.30 and the ISO 13485 when it comes to design controls for medical devices.

Basic requirements of FDA 21 CFR 820.30 and ISO 13485Both the FDA 21 CFR 820.30 and the ISO 13485 have expectations for design controls for medical devices. These are the core areas:

designControlForMedicalDevices

The Investigational New Drug Applications mechanism in the USA

The Investigational New Drug Applications mechanism in the USA.jpg

The IND is a process which gives the sponsor the opportunity to start marketing across the States of the US without having to complete the formal process. it also gives the patient the assurance that the drug that is being administered may not have gone through the full regulatory process as yet, but is as effective as one that is already in the market. The FDA has three mechanisms in place for submission of an IND.

Present Federal law requires a manufacturer who wants to market a drug in the US to subject the drug to an approved marketing application before it gets transported and/or distributed for interstate commerce, i.e., within the different States in the US.

Since it is very likely that the sponsor of a clinical trial may want to ship the investigational drug to clinical investigators across several states, it is but natural that the sponsor would look for exemption from this legal requirement. The Investigational New Drug (IND) Applications in the USA is the mechanism through which this exemption issues from the FDA to the sponsor.

investigationalNewDrugApplicationsInTheUsaWe can understand the Investigational New Drug Application this way: it is a request made by the sponsor of a clinical study with the FDA asking for its authorization to administer a biological product or an investigational drug to humans before the product goes through interstate shipment. The IND application should also be made before administering a drug that is not the same as an approved New Drug Application or Biologics/Product License Application.

The rationale behind filing Investigational New Drug Application

 

Ensuring a drug’s safety for use in humans is the basis for the entire idea of filing an Investigational New Drug Application. This is the prelude to the steps for its commercialization. By paving the way for further actions such as data collection; the Investigational New Drug Application is often the predecessor step for reinforcing the drug’s safety. An Investigational New Drug Application can be understood or taken as some kind of assurance or guarantee that when the drug that is at this stage of studies is administered on humans; it is not harmful and does not carry risks.

Ensuring a drug’s safety for use in humans is the basis for the entire idea of filing an Investigational New Drug Application. This is the prelude to the steps for its commercialization. By paving the way for further actions such as data collection; the Investigational New Drug Application is often the predecessor step for reinforcing the drug’s safety. An Investigational New Drug Application can be understood or taken as some kind of assurance or guarantee that when the drug that is at this stage of studies is administered on humans; it is not harmful and does not carry risks.

The FDA’s roleinvestigationalNewDrugApplicationsInTheUsaThe FDA’s comes into the picture when the sponsor who files an Investigational New Drug Application wants to test the effect on humans of molecules that it has screened and identified. At this stage, the status of the molecule changes into a new drug that is subject to the requirements set out by the regulatory system.

Kinds of INDsThere are three types of Investigational New Drug Applications:

investigationalNewDrugApplicationsInTheUsa
Elements of an Investigational New Drug Application
investigationalNewDrugApplicationsInTheUsaThe FDA requires an Investigational New Drug Application to contain the following:

  • Studies carried out for testing animal pharmacology and toxicology
  • Information about the manufacturing aspects of the drug
  • Information about the clinical protocols and investigator of the Investigational New Drug Application

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Export, Import and Trade Compliance Principle – an understanding

Export, import and trade compliance principle is a very important guiding standard for governing trade policies and ensuring compliance with the set national, regional and global trade norms. It helps to define an organization’s adherence to the export, import and trade compliance principle laid out by the government and also offers an understanding of the government’s outlook and stance in these matters.

There are two aspects of the export, import and trade compliance principle:

export-import-and-trade-compliance-principle
General export, import and trade compliance principles

 

As can be understood from the description of the concept of export, import and trade compliance principle; export, import and trade compliance principles laid out by the government and requiring compliance with their guidelines are fixed. Organizations cannot manipulate or tamper them. Doing so, naturally, invites penalties.

However, the export, import and trade compliance principles set out by individual companies are conditioned by their own ethics and culture. These are a reflection of how organizations carry out their export, import and trade compliance principle, something that they themselves have laid out.

export-import-and-trade-compliance-principleAdapting the right export, import and trade compliance principle and implementing it is a reflection of how well the organization understands the business and the market and how well it is able to maintain its integrity among its circles. Needless to say, an organization that says one thing and does another is seen in a negative light by its peers.

 

Organizations specialize in helping to implement export, import and trade compliance principle

 

Just as there are many organizations which are in the business of ensuring many complex fields such as governance, risk and compliance (GRC) and technology compliance; several organizations specialize in helping organizations implement both the export, import and trade compliance principle as laid out by the government, and their own export, import and trade compliance principles.

export-import-and-trade-compliance-principleWhether an organization gets its export, import and trade compliance principle implemented through an outside, third party or does it on its own; there is no escaping the fact that export, import and trade compliance principle is something that is mandatory to state and implement accordingly.

Overlaps and alignments of organizational, governmental and trade bloc requirements

export-import-and-trade-compliance-principleEven when organizations draw up their own export, import and trade compliance principle; they are bound to include the latest and relevant regulations, policies and procedures as laid out by the government. Many internal export, import and trade compliance principles and external (those prescribed and required by the government) overlap on many occasions with those of trade blocs such as the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), European Union Preferential Trade Agreement, Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), Mercosur, etc. Export, import and trade compliance principles from these different sources should align with each other.

Reasons for export, import and trade compliance principle implementation

 

The export, import and trade compliance principles laid out by respective governments are in place because of many important reasons.

 

export-import-and-trade-compliance-principle

Murj wants to give data collection from implantable medical devices an upgrade

Murj, a new company backed by $4.5 million in new venture financing, is looking to make data collection from implantable heart monitoring and management devices easier and more manageable.

The company was founded by a former Medtronic sales rep who’d previously worked as a product manager on Apple’s iPads. After a few years in sales, Murj founder Todd Butka began thinking about ways to make the data collected by cardiac technologies more easily available to physicians and diagnosticians.

Now the company is coming to market with backing from True Ventures and Social Capital.

Unlike existing technologies that deliver data in static .pdf documents, Murj collects the data and stores it in its own off-premise data warehouses. Using dashboards and other visualization tools doctors can get a better read on what’s going on with their patients’ heart health, Butka claims.

“The information comes from the devices to the implantable devices’ servers… We ping the servers,” Butka explained.

The Murj launch wraps up three years of work developing the technology, which was founded in 2014 and raised its first money in 2015.

The company, based in Santa Cruz, brought on Chris Irving as its lead designer and Patrick Beaulieu, an 18 year veteran of the medical device business, as its chief technical officer.

I think of the company as sort of an Apple Healthkit for implantable devices. If it can expand its scope beyond pacemakers and heart monitors to a broader range of implantables, it could be a pretty big business.

As the population ages, and technologies improve, demand for more persistent diagnostic tools will grow.

In a sense this is part of a number of companies that are trying to provide better tools to manage the data coming off of the sensors that we’ve got all around us.

 

Read More: http://snip.ly/kvqol#https://techcrunch.com/2017/04/18/murj-wants-to-give-data-collection-from-wearable-devices-an-upgrade/

Understanding the infinite area of medical device compliance

Understanding the infinite area of medical device compliance 1.pngWith a seemingly unlimited number of products coming under the broad umbrella of medical devices; it is but natural that regulations for these products are equally expansive. This makes medical devices compliance an extremely enormous and broad topic.

With the FDA being the sole regulator for this very vast area; it comes up with regulations, and expects medical device manufacturers to comply with them. This is part of the FDA’s primary function of assuring quality from medical devices. Compliance with these medical device regulations ensures that companies’ products meet the quality and safety and integrity of medical devices.

Areas of medical device compliance regulations

Understanding the infinite area of medical device compliance 2

The FDA’s regulation of medical devices and a few nonmedical devices cover the areas of manufacturing, repackaging, and relabeling, and/or importing. The regulations for medical devices are set out in 21 CFR Part 807, whose various sections detail all the requirements for compliance for Class I, II and III medical devices. The following are the activities connected with compliance for medical devices:

  • Registration of the establishment
  • Listing of the medical device
  • 510 (k)
  • Premarket approval
  • Investigational Device Exemption (IDE)
  • Quality Systems
  • GMP
  • Device labeling
  • Device reporting.

A thorough understanding of the FDA medical device compliance areas

Understanding the infinite area of medical device complianceThe ambit of the FDA’s regulations being very wide; it is important for medical device companies to have clarity on the many FDA medical device compliance regulations. This understanding will be offered at a seminar being organized by GlobalCompliancePanel, a very well-known provider of professional trainings for the areas of regulatory compliance.

The Director of this two-day seminar is Susanne Manz, Quality and Compliance Expert/Auditor for Medical Devices, Manz Consulting, Inc.

Please register for this webinar by visiting Understanding the infinite area of medical device compliance . This seminar has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

Helping to strategize compliance for medical devices

Understanding the infinite area of medical device compliance 3

Medical device companies need to put in place a sound strategy for medical device compliance. A certain level of strategic thinking alone ensures this. Susanne will show participants how to inculcate this thinking and instill it into the organization. She will show how to be cost-effective while improving the quality and compliance of medical devices. The ways of building a sound Quality System, which is at the root of medical device compliance; will be imparted.

An effective and efficient Quality System can only be implemented based on a thorough understanding of what the regulatory requirements mean, and adapting them into the Quality System. The ways of doing this will be the core of this seminar. Susanne will demonstrate the ways by which to plan, structure and implement a Quality System that addresses the specific business needs of the participants.

Addressing issues within a Quality System

Understanding the infinite area of medical device compliance 4

The methods for identifying, prioritizing and analyzing risks will be explained during the discussion on how to create a quality strategy and plans. Susanne will help participants explore the capabilities needed for every medical device to meet quality standards and implement compliant Quality Systems.

Also taken up for discussion are areas related to continuous improvement, Six Sigma, and Corrective and Preventive Action (CAPA), which are important components for addressing issues within a medical device company’s Quality System. Susanne will help with this very important aspect.

Over these two days, Susanne will also take up other crucial aspects of medical device compliance. These include:

  • Effectively communicating and escalating risk
  • Monitoring performance and progress
  • Kick starting the Quality System to avoid common problems such as MDRs, recalls, 483s, and Warning Letters.

Susanne will cover the following areas at this seminar on medical device compliance:

  • Quality System Expectations
  • Quality System Structure
  • Strategy and Planning
  • Risk management in your quality system
  • Case for Quality
  • Inspection preparedness and management
  • Monitoring and metrics
  • Creating a quality strategy and plans.

continue to improve the medical device compliance