The FDA Drug Development Process

This webinar provides an overview of the FDA’s Drug Development Process. This webinar also includes the major FDA regulations involved in the Drug Development Process – the GLP, GMP and GCP regulations.

This webinar is ideal for those who are new to the Drug Development process and those experienced researchers that need an update on FDA requirements.

Why should you Attend:This webinar is a must for those who have to have an understanding of FDA’s Drug Development Process.

Areas Covered in the Session:

  • Overview of FDA’s Drug Development Process
  • Nonclinical studies required
  • Human clinical studies required
  • IND requirements
  • NDA requirements

Who Will Benefit:

  • Regulatory Affairs Personnel
  • Quality Personnel
  • Research Personnel
  • Clinical Personnel
  • Project Managers
  • Legal Personnel
  • Those personnel that require a general understanding of the FDA’s Drug Development Process
Speaker Profile

Albert A. Ghignone MS, RAC is the CEO of AAG Incorporated. For more than 30 years his focus has been on FDA related matters in regulatory affairs, quality assurance and clinical affairs. He has expertise in dealing with all aspects of the FDA approval process for drugs, biologics, medical devices and generic drugs. He has worked in every major segment of the industry-research, quality assurance, regulatory affairs, manufacturing and clinical. He has been responsible for regulatory submissions, registrations, FDA liaison, clinical studies, compliance activities and FDA training. He also has expertise in the assessment of product and facilities for due diligence relative to FDA requirements. He lectures throughout the world on numerous FDA related matters. He is a consultant to FDA and trains FDA Field Force (those who conduct FDA inspections) on GCP, GLP and GMP). In addition to training FDA personnel Mr. Ghignone also consults/trains for Drug, Biologic and Medical Device companies, US Army HIV Research Group, NIH AIDS Group, US Army Surgical Research Group and the Naval Medical Research Group. He is a member of the Regulatory Affairs Professionals Society which elected him the 1984 Professional of the Year. He has served the society as Vice President, President and Chairman of the Board of Directors.

In recent years he has filed numerous FDA drug, biologic and medical device submissions for product approval. In addition he has been involved in two of the largest clinical trials conducted, the 8,000 patient clinical trial in Africa and the 16,000 patient clinical trial in Thailand.

Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation

Course “Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation” has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

In Guidance for Industry Process Validation: General Principle and Practices, process validation is defined as, “”…the collection and evaluation of data, from the process design stage through commercial production..” The guidance further delineates the ‘process design stage through commercial production’ into three distinct stages of the product lifecycle:

Stage 1: Process Design: The commercial manufacturing process is defined during this stage based on knowledge gained through development and scale-up activities.

Stage 2: Process Qualification: During this stage, the process design is evaluated to determine if the process is capable of reproducible commercial manufacturing.

Stage 3: Continued Process Verification: Ongoing assurance is gained during routine production that the process remains in a state of control.

The first stage of process validation is process design. The Process Validation guidance document states, “A successful validation program depends on information and knowledge from product and process development. This knowledge and understanding is the basis for establishing an approach to control of a manufacturing process that results in products with desired quality attributes:

Manufactures should:

  • Understand the sources of variation
  • Detect the presence and degree of variation
  • Understand the impact of variation on the process and ultimately on product attributes
  • Control the variation in a manner commensurate with the risk it represents to the process and product.”

The second stage of process validation is process qualification. Although stage 2 has two elements, this course will focus on recommendations for the second element, PPQ. PPQ “combines the actual facility, utilities, equipment (each now qualified), and the trained personnel with the commercial manufacturing process, control procedures, and components to produce commercial batches.” Additionally, the process validation guidance document that “Each manufacturer should judge whether it has gained sufficient understanding to provide a high degree of assurance in its manufacturing process to justify commercial distribution of the product. Focusing exclusively on qualification efforts without understanding the manufacturing process and associated variations may not lead to adequate assurance of quality.”

The third stage of process validation is continued process verification. The process validation guidance document defines the need for this stage: “After establishing and confirming the process, manufacturers must maintain the process in a state of control over the life of the process, even as materials, equipment, production environment, personnel, and manufacturing procedures change.” Manufacturers should use ongoing programs to collect and analyze product and process data to evaluate the state of control of the process. These programs may identify process or product problems or opportunities for process improvements that can be evaluated and implemented through some of the activities described in Stages 1 and 2.”

This course focuses on how to establish a systematic approach to implementing statistical methodologies into a process validation program consistent with the FDA guidance. It begins with a primer on statistics, focusing on methods that will be applied in each remaining chapter. Next, it teaches the application of statistics for setting specifications and assessing measurement systems (assays), two foundational requirements for process validation. Lastly, the course applies statistic through the three stages of process validation defined by requirements in the process validation regulatory guidance documents. Methods taught through all three stages are recommended by regulatory guidance documents; references to the specific citations in the guidance documents are provided.

Why you should attend:

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) provided a guidance for industry in 2011 that has established a framework for process validation in the pharmaceutical industry. This guidance, titled “Process Validation: General Principles and Practices” consists of a three-stage process. The three stages are 1) Process Design, 2) Process Qualification, and 3) Continued Process Verification.

This course focuses on how to establish a systematic approach to implementing statistical methodologies into a process development and validation program consistent with the FDA guidance. This course teaches the application of statistics for setting specifications, assessing measurement systems (assays), using design of experiments (DOE), developing a control plan as part of a risk management strategy, and ensuring process control/capability. All concepts are taught within the three-stage product cycle framework defined by requirements in the process validation regulatory guidance documents.

Although established for the pharmaceutical industry, it also provides a useful framework for other industries.

Analyses in this course use the point-and-click interface of JMP software by SAS.

Areas Covered in the Session

  • apply statistics to set specifications and validate measurement systems (assays)
  • develop appropriate sample plans based on confidence and power
  • implement suitable statistical methods into a process validation program for each of the three stages
  • Stage 1, Process Design: utilize risk management tools to identify and prioritize potential critical process parameters; and define critical process parameters and operating spaces for the commercial manufacturing process using design of experiments (DOE)
  • Stage 2, Process Qualification: assess scale effects while incorporating large (pilot and/or commercial) scale data; develop process performance qualification (PPQ) acceptance criteria by characterizing intra and inter-batch variability using process design data and batch homogeneity studies; and develop an appropriate sampling plan for PPQ
  • Stage 3, Continued Process Verification: develop a control plan as part of a risk management strategy; collect and analyze product and process data; and ensure your process is in (statistical) control and capable.

Who Will Benefit:

This seminar is designed for pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical professionals who are involved with product and/or process design, validation, or manufacturing/control.

  • Process Scientist/Engineer
  • Design Engineer
  • Product Development Engineer
  • Regulatory/Compliance Professional
  • Design Controls Engineer
  • Six Sigma Green Belt
  • Six Sigma Black Belt
  • Continuous Improvement Manager

Day 1 Schedule

Lecture 1: Introduction to Statistics for Process Validation

  • principles of process validation
  • stages of process validation

Primer on Statistical Analysis

  • basic statistics

Lecture 2: Primer on Statistical Analysis (cont.)

  • statistical intervals and hypothesis testing

Lecture 3: Primer on Statistical Analysis (cont.)

  • statistical intervals and hypothesis testing
  • ANOVA

Lecture 4: Primer on Statistical Analysis (cont.)

  • regression
  • run charts

Day 2 Schedule

Lecture 1: Foundational Requirements for Process Validation

  • setting specifications
  • analytical methodology

Stage 1 – Process Design

  • steps to DOE
  • screening designs

Lecture 2: Stage 1 – Process Design

  • response surface designs
  • establishing a strategy for process qualification

Lecture 3: Stage 2 – Process Qualification

  • introduction
  • incorporation of large-scale data
  • development of PPQ acceptance criteria
  • development of sampling plans

Lecture 4: Stage 3 – Continued Process Verification

  • statistical process control
  • process capability

Heath Rushing

Co-founder and Principal, Adsurgo

Heath Rushing is the cofounder of Adsurgo and author of the book Design and Analysis of Experiments by Douglas Montgomery: A Supplement for using JMP. Previously, he was the JMP and Six Sigma training manager at SAS. He led a team of nine technical professionals designing and delivering applied statistics and quality continuing education courses. He created tailored courses, applications, and long-term training plans in quality and statistics across a variety of industries to include biotech, pharmaceutical, medical device, and chemical processing. Mr. Rushing has been an invited speaker on applicability of statistics for national and international conferences. As a Quality Engineer at Amgen, he championed statistical principles in every business unit. He designed and delivered a DOE course that immediately became the company standard required at multiple sites. Additionally, he developed and implemented numerous innovative statistical methods advancing corporate risk management, process capability, and validation acceptance criteria. He won the top teaching award out of 54 instructors in the Air Force Academy math department where he taught several semesters and sections of operations research and statistics. Additionally, he designs and delivers short courses in statistics, data mining, and simulation modeling for SAS.

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Cleaning and Sanitation Training for Food Processors

We will cover several topics of value to food manufacturing sanitation team members. We will begin with a conceptual understanding of cleaning vs. sanitation.

We will then review proper cleaning techniques to ensure microbial and allergen residue removal. Attendees will learn about the chemicals used in industrial cleaning and sanitation and how to protect themselves against harmful exposure and accidents.

Residual Moisture Testing - Proven Techniques.jpg

Why should you attend: The industry has come a long way since the turn of the century, when the poor sanitation practices of many food manufacturing facilities was exposed. Recent events have highlighted the need for even better sanitation. The population has become decidedly more vulnerable and exposed to food borne illnesses linked to manufacturers.

The FDA cited Sunland Inc, the firm that manufactured various nut products recalled this year, for numerous sanitation violations. Failure to properly clean equipment and subsequent salmonella contamination of product resulted in a very poor outcome for this facility. Poor sanitation can also result in allergen cross contamination. Understanding where there are “dead ends” in product flow and difficult to clean areas is important for sanitation personnel to be aware of. What types of cleaning chemicals remove the various types of soils unique to each industry is also critical for an effective sanitation program. Very basic sanitation concepts and practices can make a big difference.

Course Modules & Content Details:

  • Cleaning and Sanitation practices specific to various areas of the manufacturing environment and the resultant risks
  • Types of soils and cleaning chemicals based on the properties of each
  • Results of exposure to hazardous chemicals, how to read labels and maintain chemical safety.

Areas Covered in the Session:

  • Scope of Cleaning and Sanitation
  • Sanitation Regulations and Best Practices
  • Cleaning
  • Chemical Safety
  • Review
  • Closing
  • Self Assessment

Who Will Benefit:

  • Food Manufacturing employees at all levels, especially sanitation and operations/production team members
  • Auditors who review facilities quality assurance programs
  • Customers who want to understand best practices that they should require of their suppliers will benefit
Speaker Profile
Melinda Allen is a Food Safety and Quality Consultant in the Food Industry. Melinda has had a long and dedicated career of Quality Assurance and Food Safety leadership with companies such as YUM Brands and Quiznos. Her consulting clients have included leaders in the field such as Burger King, Panda Express and Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen. She continues to work with many of these and additional clients. Melinda and her team of experienced professionals are available for Quality Assurance and Food Service auditing, Specification and Program Development and Training, Product Commercialization.

21 CFR PART 11: Complete Manual for Compliance Success

FDA inspectors are ever increasing the number of inspections where they include Part 11 as a part of the scope or THE scope of the inspection. The trends and reports are showing that the FDA inspectors are focusing on electronic signatures and electronic records as more and more companies are implementing systems and technologies to support these activities.
21 CFR PART 11 Complete Manual for Compliance Success

The number of warning letters is increasing proportionally and we as quality and other professionals utilizing the technology and systems to support our businesses are not ready – we are not ready to prepare and host FDA inspections when Part 11 is in scope, we are unsure how to best use and implement Audit Trails and certainly we have challenges with internal and external auditing for Part 11 compliance. This webinar address all these topics and provides you with plenty HOW TO we as auditors and inspectors increase our comfort level with the regulation, with its elements and compliance and practically implement audit system and audit trails – especially since Audit Trails play major role in Part 11 compliance – they can be your best friends and/or worst enemies at the same time.

Areas Covered in the Seminar:

  • How to Prepare and Host FDA Inspections (will cover elements and details of preparation for the inspection as well as elements of the successful practices of hosting an FDA inspection when Part 11 is in scope or the scope of the inspection. We will also cover some commonly asked questions by the inspectors and benefits of being compliant)
  • Internal and External Auditing for Part 11 Compliance (this subtopic includes all aspects of auditing for Part 11 compliance- starting at the audit program level and then going down on how to prepare for an audit to how to successfully execute the audit and follow up on the completed audit. This subtopic also includes CAPA and responses for the audit findings related to Part 11 – what to expect and handle the difference between “regular” audits and Part 11 audits. We include some of the common audit findings and common pitfalls as well as tools for a successful planning and execution of the audit.)
  • Audit Trails (includes types of audit trails, strategies for implementing complaint audit trails, proms and cons of audit trails, how to use audit trails as an audit tool during the internal and external audit as well as during the FDA inspection visit, some examples of “should” and “shouldn’t” when it comes to the audit trails and commonly asked questions related to audit trails.)
  • Overview and Understanding of the Regulation (covers topics such as introduction and development of the regulation, what to expect in the future when it comes to the regulation, options for (non)compliance, “what ifs”, as well as most impactful sections and subsections of the regulations.)
  • How Part 11 Regulation Relates to Other Regulations (this subtopic compares the Part 11 regulation with other regulations focusing on commonalities so that you and your organization can see how easy/hard is to identify gaps as well as how harvest the low hanging fruits when striving to comply with Part 11 regulation. We cover comparison with 3-4 other regulations quoting the exact subsections of each.)
  • Sample Audit Questions (throughout the material, we ensure that we present you and prepare you to deal with some commonly asked audit and inspection questions. These questions are ready-made for you to use when you and your team are conducting internal and/or external audits, but they are also ready-made for you and your team to use as you prepare to/and host FDA inspection when Part 11 in scope of the inspection. We include some of the questions in the material presentation and in addition to that we provide you with additional 30+ commonly asked questions document which you can use for your references and training purposes.)
  • Trends; Warning Letter Examples; Advantages and Challenges of the Regulation (we conducted research to bring you and your team results of inspections and audits that have been conducted in past several years. We include trends and graphs showing how and where Part 11 regulations impacts you the most, but will also show examples of the warning letters that have been issued in last several years due to lack of compliance with the Part 11 regulation. Finally, we cover and include some examples of advantages and challenges you may be benefiting from or facing to address while striving to be Part 11 compliant.)
  • More (we talk about the importance and significance of the regulation regardless if it (currently) applies to you or not. We provide examples and HOW TO so that you and your team can get most out of the materials and presentation – and to be able to use it immediately after attending this training/webinar.)

Who Will Benefit:

  • Quality Managers
  • Quality Engineers
  • Manufacturing engineers
  • CAPA investigators
  • Inspectors
  • Six Sigma specialists
  • Consultants
Speaker Profile

Jasmin NUHIC serves a major medical devices OEM as a Sr. Compliance Quality Engineer and 21 CFR Part 11 Subject Matter Expert. He also served ASQ section as a chair for two consecutive terms, has taught quality certification exam prep course, completed numerous software validations and obtained over 25 different certifications in leadership, quality, software validations, and more. Jasmin NUHIC has conducted Webinars on this and other topics with high attendance and appreciation.

What are the FDA’s Process Validation requirements?

Process Validation (PV), according to the FDA, is collecting and assessing data right from the design stage till the production stage. PV is set out for all the stages of production for a product in the FDA-regulated industries. The core purpose of PV is to establish scientific proof that any process being employed has the capability of delivering quality products consistently.

The FDA’s process validation requirements are set out in its general principles of Process Validation. Starting from 1987, the FDA has been issuing guidelines at intervals to state, improve and strengthen the general principles of Process Validation. In almost a quarter century of the first guideline, the revision of January 2011 came into being. This guideline is considered a landmark and a guide for PV professionals since it reworked extensively and expanded the general principles on process validation. It is the current guideline from the FDA on Process Validation requirements.

These are what the FDA’s 2011 guideline on general principles on Process Validation propagate:

  • Incorporation of the principles of sound science
  • Taking steps to assess and mitigate risk
  • Bringing about improvements in every stage of the process
  • Adapting the science-based principles of contemporary manufacturing
  • Fostering and encouraging innovation

The centrality of control to process validation

Process validation is tied to the product lifecycle approach by the FDA general principles on process validation of 2011. The central purpose of process validation is to ensure that the process is in a state of control at all stages of production.

The following points illustrate the reason for which the FDA expects its PV requirements to be met:

  • Being a process that is ongoing and continuous, PV begins at the earliest stages of production and goes on till the product’s lifecycle is completed
  • Those in charge of commercial production should have deep and intimate knowledge of the workings of PV principles
  • Only this knowledge helps PV professional locate the sources of variability and address them
  • Only PV into which risk management is built frees errors from the product

The three stages of PV

The FDA stipulates three layers or stages on which its general principles of Process Validation are built:

  • Process design: The stage in which the knowledge gained helps the commercial process define the process development activities
  • Process qualification: The stage where PV guarantees that the process design has the capability for being reproduced at industrial level
  • Continued Process Validation: The most important stage PV in that this is where the element of control into the routine production process is introduced and built; Continued Process Validation takes under its ambit all activities such as continuous verification, maintenance, and process improvement. Information is collected and monitored during commercialization to assess the Continued Process Validation stage.

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Seminar

Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation

Course “Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation” has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

In Guidance for Industry Process Validation: General Principle and Practices, process validation is defined as, “”…the collection and evaluation of data, from the process design stage through commercial production..” The guidance further delineates the ‘process design stage through commercial production’ into three distinct stages of the product lifecycle:

Stage 1: Process Design: The commercial manufacturing process is defined during this stage based on knowledge gained through development and scale-up activities.

Stage 2: Process Qualification: During this stage, the process design is evaluated to determine if the process is capable of reproducible commercial manufacturing.

Stage 3: Continued Process Verification: Ongoing assurance is gained during routine production that the process remains in a state of control.

The first stage of process validation is process design. The Process Validation guidance document states, “A successful validation program depends on information and knowledge from product and process development. This knowledge and understanding is the basis for establishing an approach to control of a manufacturing process that results in products with desired quality attributes:

Manufactures should:

  • Understand the sources of variation
  • Detect the presence and degree of variation
  • Understand the impact of variation on the process and ultimately on product attributes
  • Control the variation in a manner commensurate with the risk it represents to the process and product.”

The second stage of process validation is process qualification. Although stage 2 has two elements, this course will focus on recommendations for the second element, PPQ. PPQ “combines the actual facility, utilities, equipment (each now qualified), and the trained personnel with the commercial manufacturing process, control procedures, and components to produce commercial batches.” Additionally, the process validation guidance document that “Each manufacturer should judge whether it has gained sufficient understanding to provide a high degree of assurance in its manufacturing process to justify commercial distribution of the product. Focusing exclusively on qualification efforts without understanding the manufacturing process and associated variations may not lead to adequate assurance of quality.”

The third stage of process validation is continued process verification. The process validation guidance document defines the need for this stage: “After establishing and confirming the process, manufacturers must maintain the process in a state of control over the life of the process, even as materials, equipment, production environment, personnel, and manufacturing procedures change.” Manufacturers should use ongoing programs to collect and analyze product and process data to evaluate the state of control of the process. These programs may identify process or product problems or opportunities for process improvements that can be evaluated and implemented through some of the activities described in Stages 1 and 2.”

This course focuses on how to establish a systematic approach to implementing statistical methodologies into a process validation program consistent with the FDA guidance. It begins with a primer on statistics, focusing on methods that will be applied in each remaining chapter. Next, it teaches the application of statistics for setting specifications and assessing measurement systems (assays), two foundational requirements for process validation. Lastly, the course applies statistic through the three stages of process validation defined by requirements in the process validation regulatory guidance documents. Methods taught through all three stages are recommended by regulatory guidance documents; references to the specific citations in the guidance documents are provided.


Why you should attend:

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) provided a guidance for industry in 2011 that has established a framework for process validation in the pharmaceutical industry. This guidance, titled “Process Validation: General Principles and Practices” consists of a three-stage process. The three stages are 1) Process Design, 2) Process Qualification, and 3) Continued Process Verification.

This course focuses on how to establish a systematic approach to implementing statistical methodologies into a process development and validation program consistent with the FDA guidance. This course teaches the application of statistics for setting specifications, assessing measurement systems (assays), using design of experiments (DOE), developing a control plan as part of a risk management strategy, and ensuring process control/capability. All concepts are taught within the three-stage product cycle framework defined by requirements in the process validation regulatory guidance documents.

Although established for the pharmaceutical industry, it also provides a useful framework for other industries.

Analyses in this course use the point-and-click interface of JMP software by SAS.


Areas Covered in the Session

  • apply statistics to set specifications and validate measurement systems (assays)
  • develop appropriate sample plans based on confidence and power
  • implement suitable statistical methods into a process validation program for each of the three stages
  • Stage 1, Process Design: utilize risk management tools to identify and prioritize potential critical process parameters; and define critical process parameters and operating spaces for the commercial manufacturing process using design of experiments (DOE)
  • Stage 2, Process Qualification: assess scale effects while incorporating large (pilot and/or commercial) scale data; develop process performance qualification (PPQ) acceptance criteria by characterizing intra and inter-batch variability using process design data and batch homogeneity studies; and develop an appropriate sampling plan for PPQ
  • Stage 3, Continued Process Verification: develop a control plan as part of a risk management strategy; collect and analyze product and process data; and ensure your process is in (statistical) control and capable.

Who Will Benefit:

This seminar is designed for pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical professionals who are involved with product and/or process design, validation, or manufacturing/control.

  • Process Scientist/Engineer
  • Design Engineer
  • Product Development Engineer
  • Regulatory/Compliance Professional
  • Design Controls Engineer
  • Six Sigma Green Belt
  • Six Sigma Black Belt
  • Continuous Improvement Manager

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Virtual Seminar on 21 CFR Part 11 Compliance for Computer Systems Regulated by FDA

The Webinar will focus on the importance of ensuring that electronic record/electronic signature (ER/ES) capability built into FDA-regulated computer systems meets compliance with 21 CFR Part 11. This includes development of a company philosophy and approach, and incorporating it into the overall computer system validation program and plans for individual systems that have this capability.

FDA’s 21 CFR Part 11 was enacted in the late 1990s and implementation success across the pharmaceutical and other regulated industries has been mixed. There are very specific limitations that arise when using ER/ES capability, such as the elimination of print capability to prevent users from making decisions based on a paper record as opposed to the electronic record. It also requires very specific identification of users that ensures the person signing the record is the same person whose credentials are being entered and verified by the system. Rule for changing passwords must be rigorously adhered to and the passwords must be kept secure.

It is also critical that the system specify the exact meaning of the signature. It may be that the person conducted the work, recorded the result, reviewed the result, or approved the result. A person may simply be attesting to the fact that they reviewed the work and the signatures, and there was appropriate segregation of duties (i.e., the person recording the result is not the same as either the person reviewing or the person giving final approval).

A company must have specific policies and procedures in place that explicitly state responsibilities and provide guidance for implementing and using ER/ES capability. These must clarify the 21 CFR Part 11 regulation and provide insight as to the way the company interprets their responsibility for meeting it. As FDA continues to evolve and change due to the many factors that influence the regulatory environment, companies must be able to adapt.

New technologies will continue to emerge that will change the way companies do business. While many of these are intended to streamline operations, reducing time and resources, some unintentionally result in added layers of oversight that encumber a computer system validation program and require more time and resources, making the technology unattractive from a cost-benefit perspective.

Why you should attend

FDA requires that all computer systems that handle data regulated by the Agency be validated in accordance with their guidance on computerized systems. This guidance was first issued in 1983, and the main points of focus remain consistent today, despite the number of years that have passed and the technology changes that have taken place.

The guidance was revisited for its application to the medical device industry in the 1990s, as the first issuance addressed pharmaceuticals only. In 1997, 21 CFR Part 11 was issued to address electronic records and signatures, as many FDA-regulated organizations began seeking ways to move into a paperless environment.

This guidance has been modified over the years to make it more palatable to industry, and this includes discretionary enforcement measures, but still remains somewhat confusing. The intent was to avoid creating a huge regulatory compliance cost to industry that was initially preventing companies from embracing the technology.

This seminar will help you understand in detail the application of FDA’s 21 CFR Part 11 guidance on electronic records/electronic signatures (ER/ES) for computer systems subject to FDA regulations. This is critical in order to develop the appropriate validation strategy and achieve the thoroughness required to prove that a system does what it purports to do. It also ensures that a system is maintained in a validated state throughout its entire life cycle, from conception through retirement.

ER/ES capability can vary, and the approach should be based on the specific case and the risk of failing to meet the guidance associated with it.

Who Will Benefit

  • Information Technology Analysts
  • Information Technology Managers
  • QC/QA Managers
  • QC/QA Analysts
  • Clinical Data Managers
  • Clinical Data Scientists
  • Analytical Chemists
  • Compliance Managers
  • Laboratory Managers
  • Automation Analysts
  • Manufacturing Managers
  • Manufacturing Supervisors
  • Supply Chain Specialists
  • Computer System Validation Specialists
  • GMP Training Specialists
  • Business Stakeholders responsible for computer system validation planning, execution, reporting, compliance, maintenance and audit
  • Consultants working in the life sciences industry who are involved in computer system implementation, validation and compliance
  • Auditors Engaged in Internal Inspection

Session 1 (90 Mins):

  • FDA Regulatory Oversight
  • Computer System Validation (CSV)
  • System Development Life Cycle (SDLC) Methodology
  • GAMP 5 Software Categorization
  • System Risk Assessment

Session 2 (90 Mins):

  • 21 CFR Part 11 Compliance (Electronic Records/Electronic Signatures)
  • Security, Access, Change Control and Audit Trail
  • Validation Documentation

Session 3 (90 Mins):

  • 7 Most Common Problems with Validation
  • FDA Audit Preparation

Session 4 (90 Mins):

  • Policies and Procedures
  • Training and Organizational Change Management
  • Industry Best Practices and Common Pitfalls
  • Q&A

Speaker Profile

Carolyn (McKillop) Troiano has more than 35 years of experience in the tobacco, pharmaceutical, medical device and other FDA-regulated industries. She has worked directly, or on a consulting basis, for many of the larger pharmaceutical and tobacco companies in the US and Europe, developing and executing compliance strategies and programs. Carolyn is currently active in the Association of Information Technology Professionals (AITP), and Project Management Institute (PMI) chapters in the Richmond, VA area.

During her career, Carolyn worked directly, or on a consulting basis, for many of the larger pharmaceutical companies in the US and Europe. She developed validation programs and strategies back in the mid-1980s, when the first FDA guidebook was published on the subject, and collaborated with FDA and other industry representatives on 21 CFR Part 11, the FDA’s electronic record/electronic signature regulation.

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