Mental health staff on long-term stress leave up 22%

Mental health staff on long
Image caption Some trusts saw the number of staff taking long-term leave double in five years

The number of NHS mental health staff who have had to take sick leave because of their own mental health issues has risen by 22% in the past five years.

Those taking long-term leave of a month or more rose from 7,580 in 2012-13 to 9,285 in 2016-17, BBC freedom of information requests found.

The union Unite said cuts to staff and services were putting extra pressure on front-line mental health workers.

The Department of Health said it was transforming mental health care.

Out of 81 mental health authorities in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, 58 provided the BBC with comparable information.

Looking after ourselves

One mental health doctor who had to take mental health leave told 5 live anonymously: “I don’t think I realised it was happening until quite a long way down the road.”

She explained that she was getting irritable with her partner, her sleep was disturbed and she couldn’t switch off from work.

“In the end, I went to my GP who offered me a sick note. I was quite taken aback that it was quite so obvious to my GP that I needed to be off work.” she said.

Media captionFormer mental health nurse on why she had to leave the NHS

“As mental health practitioners, we are pretty rubbish at putting our own mental health first. You need to put your own oxygen mask on first before putting it on to someone else.”

5 live also spoke to a group of community mental health nurses at the Leeds and York Partnership NHS Foundation Trust about how they cope with the pressure of the role.

“I think when you’re so passionate about something it’s very easy to overlook just how much you are taking on,” said Kate Ward, an occupational therapist working as a care co-ordinator in the team.

Read More: http://snip.ly/okuj8#http://www.bbc.com/news/health-41172805

Monitoring the heart’s mitochondria to predict cardiac arrest?

IMAGE
Credit: Dr. John Kheir, Boston Children’s Hospital & Shutterstock

A new device can assess in real time whether the body’s tissues are receiving enough oxygen and, placed on the heart, can predict cardiac arrest in critically ill heart patients, report researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital and scientists from Cambridge device maker Pendar Technologies. Their study, conducted in animal models, is the cover article in today’s issue of Science Translational Medicine.

 

“With current technologies, we cannot predict when a patient’s heart will stop,” says John Kheir, MD of Boston Children’s Heart Center, who co-led the study. “We can examine heart function on the echocardiogram and measure blood pressure, but until the last second, the heart can compensate quite well for low oxygen conditions. Once cardiac arrest occurs, its consequences can be life-long, even when patients recover.”

The device uses a technology called resonance Raman spectroscopy to measure whether enough oxygen is reaching the mitochondria, the organelles that provide cells with energy. In critically ill patients with compromised circulation or breathing, oxygen delivery is often impaired, making it hard for mitochondria to do their job. This is especially a problem for the heart, which has constant high energy needs.

The current standard for measuring tissue oxygenation, known as mixed venous saturation (SvO2), requires repeated blood draws, adding extra risk in critically ill patients. More importantly, SvO2 cannot tell whether oxygen supply is sufficient to meet the dynamic demands of heart muscle.

“We wanted to create an organ-specific, continuous, reliable readout of how adequately mitochondria are being fed oxygen,” says Kheir. “This is the first demonstration of a device that can monitor mitochondria in living tissues to predict impending organ failure.”

Using light to monitor mitochondria

This technology is the product of a collaboration between the Translational Research Lab in Boston Children’s Heart Center, co-led by Kheir and Brian Polizzotti, PhD, and Pendar Technologies (Cambridge, Mass.). “At the bedside, we saw patients who had a limitation to coronary blood flow, and wanted a device that could provide an early warning sign,” Kheir says.

The team created a metric they call 3RMR that uses light readings generated by resonance Raman spectroscopy to quantify oxygenation and mitochondrial function in real time.

 

Read More: http://snip.ly/bt6o8#https://scienmag.com/monitoring-the-hearts-mitochondria-to-predict-cardiac-arrest-2/

Congress, keep hands off employer sponsored plans in healthcare fights

Congress, keep hands

Lawmakers are back in town and soon the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee will once again take up the beast that is healthcare.

Some will be tempted to merely throw more money and the semblance of flexibility into a broken system — we urge them  to reject this Band-Aid, and to instead implement real reforms. The ERISA Industry Committee (ERIC) implores Congress not to take this opportunity to protect the employer-sponsored health insurance system, which is the single most common source of health coverage in the nation, providing 178 million Americans with access to healthcare.

Congress is focused on stabilizing endangered exchange marketplaces. ERIC heartily agrees that market stabilization is important for everyone, but addressing the cost sharing reduction (CSR) payments to insurance companies is just a small part of solving the problem.

 

Last month, ERIC, along with several other organizations, sent a letter to Congress with policy recommendations that would help stabilize the market, while also ensuring the future of affordable employer-provided health benefits.

We recommended Congress should fund CSR payments to improve affordability in the individual market. Congress should also repeal the 40 percent “Cadillac” tax on employer-sponsored health plans, with no new taxes on health benefits. And lawmakers should repeal the health insurance tax on fully insured health plans, which a recent Oliver Wyman study found will cost Americans $22 billion next year alone. They should also enable employers to innovate with Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) and protect the ability of employers to offer uniform benefits to employees and their families — no matter where they live, work, or receive medical care.

Tax relief is key to protecting the employer-sponsored system. Since World War II, the American tax code has encouraged employers to set up quality health plans for their employees by exempting company health benefit expenditures from income and payroll taxes. The Affordable Care Act placed a crippling financial burden on plan sponsors through the employer mandate and the taxes mentioned above.

An easy place to start would be fully repealing the highly unpopular Cadillac tax. It has already been delayed until 2020 and lawmakers have voted to repeal it twice. The first time in 2015 and the most recent during the healthcare votes this past July.

The Cadillac tax will hit more than 50 percent of the workforce within ten years of its implementation, according to a January study by the consulting firm Milliman —that’s 60 million Americans. These employees could see their benefits slashed by thousands of dollar while their salaries stay flat.

Some economists theorize that because of the Cadillac tax, workers might see their pre-tax wages increase as employers switch to cheaper plans. But if that happens, employees would also pay a lot more in taxes, costing 12.1 million employees upwards of $1,000 in higher payroll and income taxes.

In fact, 80 percent of the revenue raised by the Cadillac tax is expected to come from workers paying more income and payroll taxes, according to the Joint Committee on Taxation and the Congressional Budget Office.

Aside from health tax relief, another way to improve the healthcare system is updating consumer-directed health options like Health Savings Accounts (HSAs). The Committee and Congress should raise HSA contribution limits, ensuring that HSA and high-deductible plan beneficiaries have access to supplemental benefits. They should also allow consumers to use their HSAs to purchase over-the-counter medicines while updating rules to ensure those enrolled in HSA-compatible plans can benefit from first-dollar coverage for prescription drugs and other medical products and services likely to prevent or reduce catastrophic episodes in the future.

The Senate HELP Committee must also look at value-based healthcare options, which are ways plan sponsors and consumers can spend healthcare dollars smarter. Earlier this year, The ERISA Industry Committee and the Pacific Business Group on Health launched the DRIVE Health Initiative, a campaign to accelerate economic growth by controlling health costs and improving quality through the rapid adoption of value-based healthcare. The initiative calls for targeted deregulation and the use of market-based purchasing strategies by Medicare and other federal health programs.

Fixing healthcare is not easy. As lawmakers move forward in crafting new legislation, they must be sure it protects the employer-sponsored system that has provided affordable, quality coverage to more than half of the population for decades and allow for continued improvement and innovations.

If they don’t, the employer-sponsored health insurance system could be in jeopardy, creating a much bigger problem than that of the ACA exchanges.

James Gelfand is the senior vice president for health policy at The ERISA Industry Committee (ERIC). ERIC is the only national association that advocates exclusively for large employers on health, retirement and compensation public policies at the federal, state and local levels.

How does the US healthcare system compare with other countries?

Despite US legislation in 2010 that moved the country closer to achieving universal healthcare, costs have continued to rise and nearly 26 million Americans are still uninsured according to the Congressional Budget Office.

As Republicans decide whether to repeal or replace the struggling healthcare policy, how does the existing US healthcare system compare with those in other countries?

Broadly speaking, the World Health Organization (WHO) defines universal health coverage as a system where everyone has access to quality health services and is protected against financial risk incurred while accessing care.

A brief history of the healthcare systems used today

Among the 35 OECD member countries, 32 have now introduced universal healthcare legislation that resembles the WHO criteria.

In Germany, the world’s first national health insurance system shows how UHC often evolves from an initial law. Originally for industrial labourers, cover gradually expanded to cover all job sectors and social groups, with today’s German workers contributing around 15% of their monthly salary, half paid by employers, to public sickness funds.

Established in 1948 to be free at the point of use, the UK’s NHS has almost totemic status for Britain’s rising, ageing population who scrutinise it like perhaps no other policy area. While care from GP services to major surgery remains free as intended, the system is under unprecedented financial strain from a funding gap estimated to be in the billions.

Under France’s state-run equivalent of the UK’s NHS, the majority of patients must pay the doctor or practitioner upfront. The state then reimburses them in part or in full. Workers make compulsory payments into state funds used to reimburse between 70% and 100% of the upfront fees, while many people pay into other schemes to cover the balance.

In the mid-1960s, the United States implemented insurance programs called Medicare and Medicaid for segments of the population including low income and elderly adults. In 2010, Obamacare became the closest the US has come to a system of UHC. A legal mandate now requires all Americans to have insurance or pay a penalty. About 26 million people remain without health insurance despite these advances.

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Spending compared with life expectancy

Life expectancy in the US is still lower than other developed countries, despite health funding increasing at a much faster pace.

https://interactive.guim.co.uk/uploader/embed/2017/07/archive-4-zip/giv-3902KPB1eyzruSUd/

Who provides healthcare and how is it paid for?

How healthcare is funded has a direct effect on the level of healthcare people have access to.

Single-payer

The state funds an agreed range of services through public clinics that are paid for through taxes
For example, in Sweden there is a limit in how much you pay for healthcare in one year of between 900-1100 kronor (£80-£100)

Two-tier

Government healthcare may be less comprehensive and minimum level of coverage can be supplemented by private insurance
In Australia, hospital treatment is covered by Medicare, yet most people pay a fee to see a GP or for ambulance services. 57% of adults have private insurance

Insurance mandate

A two-tier system underpinned by an insurance mandate where citizens are legally required to purchase cover from public or private insurers
Most people in Japan receive health insurance from their employer, otherwise they must sign up for a national health insurance programme. Medical fees are regulated to keep them affordable

How could the US healthcare system change?

Donald Trump ran on a campaign to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, popularly known as Obamacare, but discord among Republicans has highlighted the political challenges faced with implementing a healthcare system, much less trying to change it.

With millions still uninsured and the financial burden of healthcare still quite high, the current US policy falls short of the WHO threshold.

Thus far, separate bills introduced in the House and the Senate were estimated to see steep increases in the number of uninsured from current levels.

Estimated uninsured under existing and proposed healthcare plans

https://interactive.guim.co.uk/uploader/embed/2017/07/us-health-bills/giv-390230uMJnHPMgxF/

Don’t miss out! Offer @ $10 – Online Professional Courses

7This is a great deal. What else does one call this offer $10 deal to enhance professional skill from GlobalCompliancePanel? Wait. We are talking about $10, but did we tell you what you get for $10? Did you think it is the cost of registration for the event? Well, be prepared to get proven wrong –for the happiest of reasons. $10 is the price of a single recorded webinar that GlobalCompliancePanel is putting up at this great deal @$10 to enhance professional skills with GlobalCompliancePanel!

4Yes indeed, after all the rubbing of your eyes to confirm the truth of this seal, GlobalCompliancePanel assures you that it indeed has a great deal @$10 to enhance professional skills with GlobalCompliancePanel! Could regulatory trainings become more inexpensive and more affordable? Nowhere else in the market does one something of such high value as professional trainings in the regulatory compliance area for this price. Of course, a lot of items are available in the market for this price. Let us talk about a few toiletries. Let us talk about a few used books. Let us talk about some children’s clothing. But professional trainings that will take your profession as a regulatory compliance professional a few notches higher, at $10? Well, you can take your time to believe this, but it is true.

8This great deal @$10 to enhance professional skills with GlobalCompliancePanel is open to all professionals who want to enhance their skill and learning of the regulations in their respective domains of specialization. Who wouldn’t want to, at this price? When professional trainings in regulatory compliance becomes available at this great deal @$10 to enhance professional skills with GlobalCompliancePanel; what could be a better means to spend your ten dollars!

4What is the motive behind this offer? Simple: GlobalCompliancePanel has been a provider of professional trainings for the regulatory compliance arena for a good ten years now. It has become an established name in this area. It thought, why not make our trainings more wide-ranging and accessible to many more professionals? After all, regulations do keep changing every now and then. Shouldn’t regulatory professionals keep pace with them?

3A rich assortment of courses is available at this great deal @$10 to enhance professional skills with GlobalCompliancePanel. You can choose from trainings that help you with nuances of how to establish a reduce testing program for pharmaceutical and medical device components, where the guru of starting up, developing, implementing, managing, and remediating pharmaceutical and medical device Quality Systems, Howard Cooper, will show how to derive the benefits of systematic reduced testing program include increased compliance, smaller inventory cycles, less testing, less handling, and increased productivity and efficiency.

9Are you at odds when it comes to designing, planning and conducting effective audits? Then, why don’t you purchase this webinar that comes as part of great deal @$10 to enhance professional skills with GlobalCompliancePanel, in which Mark Roberts, Head of Roberts Consulting and Engineering (RCE), a consulting firm specializing in quality system and sterility assurance compliance, will offer his insights?

There could be no better means to improve your knowledge of regulatory requirements. And the time is now, with this great deal @$10 to enhance professional skills with GlobalCompliancePanel!

Contact Details:

https://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/webinars_home?wordpress-2017-SEO

John.robinson@globalcompliancepanel.com

Support@globalcompliancepanel.com

+1-800-447-9407

 

Healthcare Compliance Professional Courses @ 10$ from GlobalCompliancePanel

globalcompliancepanel1.jpg

Healthcare professionals now have a stronger reason than ever before to enroll for professional learning courses and upgrade their knowledge. GlobalCompliancePanel, a highly reputable provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance, will offer a pick of their healthcare compliance courses for just $10.

Healthcare professionals have always been flocking to GlobalCompliancePanel to partake of professional trainings courses that are valuable, relevant and highly interesting. They will now have more reasons for doing so and join thousands of healthcare regulatory professionals who have already benefited from GlobalCompliancePanel’s professional trainings, because it is not every day that one comes across an offer in which the professional gets to pay a mere 5% of the original price of the webinars!

These recorded webinars are on a number of topics concerning healthcare. Healthcare professionals can use these courses to augment the learning they have gained over the years and climb up in their professions with even greater ease. What’s more; healthcare professionals have such a huge number and variety of courses to choose from that they can opt for several courses of relevance to them without burning a hole in the pocket.

Why is GlobalCompliancePanel doing this? Simple: It wants more and more healthcare professionals to take up courses that are relevant and valuable to them, so that the knowledge needed for becoming successful in their careers spreads wider and goes deeper. After all, meeting regulatory compliance requirements is the number one challenge for any healthcare professional, who sees no way out of the regulatory maze without the professional trainings needed to understand them. When such a course is available at a throwaway price of $10, isn’t that a delightful thing to have?

Let us feature a couple of the topics on which GlobalCompliancePanel is offering these courses to healthcare regulatory professionals:

The HITECH Acts Impact on HIPAA

HIPAA enforcement is a matter of serious concern to many healthcare professionals. Many of them, even highly experienced ones, are clueless about some of the aspects of this enigmatic law. When HITECH combines with HIPAA; the confusion is doubled. The two laws intersect at many places, thus compounding the complexity of enforcement. This webinar from GlobalCompliancePanel offers clarity and helps them ease the confusion about this law.

Further, the nature and roles of a host of HIPAA-related items such as breach notification, business associate contracts, training of staff and security of PHI for Business Associates can be daunting to understand and implement. Webinars such as this are designed to help healthcare professionals steer clear of the stumbling blocks that they could encounter in implementing these.

Preparing a Medical Product Regulatory Requirement Plan

What happens when healthcare companies fail to meet regulatory requirements set out by the FDA and other regulatory agencies? The consequences are disastrous, and can range from penalties to having their business shut down. One of the foundations to avoiding this sort of situation is to develop a medical product regulatory requirement plan.

A medical product regulatory requirement plan charts out the regulatory requirements  that need to be met from step one, which is quite literally Day One of the start of the process of making healthcare products. A detailed and organized medical product regulatory requirement plan is indispensable to ensuring in the end that the healthcare product meets the regulatory requirements.

It is this priceless learning that this webinar from GlobalCompliancePanel imparts. And yes, at $10!

Drug Safety and Pharmacovigilance

Pharmacovigilance, a crucial area of healthcare, needs to be implemented in full according to the requirements set out in regulations from the FDA, EMA and other regulatory agencies. Drug safety being deeply tied to PV; the proper implementation of the latter is needed to ensure the former.

PV is essentially about ensuring drug safety by implementing measures throughout the process of production. A healthcare company has to comply with directions from a number of regulatory agencies in order to have its products passed by them and to gain permission to enter different markets. They cannot afford to take one wrong step in the whole process. A number of areas such as clinical trials, marketing, disease management and government are just some of the areas in which pharmacovigilance is indispensable.

This webinar from GlobalCompliancePanel is a great means to getting a complete understanding of this intricate topic. The topic is of great relevance to healthcare professionals, but what’s more; it comes at this unbelievable price tag of just $10!

Contact Details:

http://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/webinars_home

John.robinson@globalcompliancepanel.com

Support@globalcompliancepanel.com

+1-800-447-9407

 

Excel spreadsheet validation to eliminate 483s

One of the basic issues for organizations in the regulated area is to carry out Excel spreadsheet validation to eliminate 483s.

Why is this so? The FDA requires validation of electronic records, and this is a key requirement. The FDA has its set of regulatory requirements set out in 21 CFR Part 11. This code requires pharmaceutical, biotech, medical device, CRO, life sciences or related FDA-regulated organizations electronic records to be compliant with it. From this, the importance of Excel spreadsheet validation to eliminate 483s can be understood, because configuring an organization’s Excel spreadsheet application is a key requirement.

Making electronic records as genuine as physical records

21 CFR Part 11 is a set of FDA requirements, with which organizations have to comply to demonstrate that the electronic records they use are as good as the same as paper records in terms of genuineness. This is a core requirement for ensuring that electronic records do not get manipulated.

It is to nullify the drawbacks of using electronic records that 21 CFR Part 11 has to be implemented. One of the important aspects of 21 CFR Part 11 is Excel spreadsheet validation. Organizations need to know how to do Excel spreadsheet validation to eliminate 483s. The important benefit of being compliant is that it not only helps organizations avoid 483’s; when done properly, it saves two-thirds of the validation time and costs.

What does it take?

If an organization has to use Excel spreadsheet validation to eliminate 483’s, it needs to:

  • Know what does and does not need to be validated.
  • Know how to configure spreadsheet applications for Part 11 compliance
  • Have an understanding of how to use Excel’s built in 21 CFR Part 11 features for audit trails, security, data verification, and multiple concurrent users
  • Use risk assessment to reduce testing and improve productivity.
  • Specify and test its own GxP Excel application
  • Create a User Requirements document for the application
  • Create a Project Plan document for the application
  • Create a Functional Specifications document for its application
  • Create a Hazard Analysis document for its application
  • Create a Testing Protocol document for your application

Contact Detail
GlobalCompliancePanel
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