Pharmacist in deadly meningitis outbreak heading to trial

Pharmacist in deadl

After watching his mother die from meningitis in a nationwide outbreak caused by contaminated steroids, Scott Shaw is determined to make sure something like that never happens again.

A stiff punishment for the Massachusetts pharmacist Shaw believes is partially responsible may help, he says.

“I believe as surely as I’m talking to you right now that if something isn’t done, we will repeat this again,” the North Carolina man said.

Glenn Chin, the supervisory pharmacist at the now-closed New England Compounding Center in Framingham, about 22 miles (35 kilometers) west of Boston, is to go on trial Tuesday for his role in the 2012 fungal meningitis outbreak that killed 76 people and sickened hundreds of others.

Chin faces up to life in prison if convicted of all counts of second-degree murder under federal racketeering law.

Experts, and Chin’s defense attorney, believe prosecutors have a stronger case against Chin than they did against the co-founder of the compounding pharmacy, Barry Cadden. Cadden was sentenced in June to nine years in prison after being acquitted of second-degree murder charges but convicted on conspiracy and fraud charges.

Chin ran the so-called clean rooms where steroid injections were made. He is accused of failing to properly sterilize the drugs, among other things. Chin also faces conspiracy, mail fraud and other charges.

“I’m just a little concerned that the judge and the jury might be a little more harsh on Glenn Chin because he was doing the work in the clean room,” Chin’s attorney, Stephen Weymouth, said.

Throughout Cadden’s trial, the co-founder’s lawyers tried to push the blame onto Chin. Chin intends to point the finger back at Cadden.

Weymouth said he will argue that Chin was essentially a “puppet” for Cadden, who made working in the clean rooms so difficult that “mistakes might have been made.” Cadden was the one calling the shots and pushing the orders to line his own pockets, Weymouth said.

 

Read More: http://snip.ly/kx5et#http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/pharmacist-deadly-meningitis-outbreak-heading-trial-49907214

Pharmaceutical companies gave $12m to doctors, nurses and pharmacists

Pharmaceutical companies gave $12m to doctors, nurses and pharmacists.jpg

Pharmaceutical companies gave Australian doctors, nurses and pharmacists almost $12m in fees and expenses to attend conferences and give talks between November 2016 and April 2017.

The payments comprised more than $6.5m for travel expenses and accommodation; more than $4.2m in speaking and consultancy fees; and more than $700,000 to cover registration at medical conferences and events.

The drug companies Bristol-Myers Squibb and Amgen both spent more than $1m over the six months and one doctor received more than $39,000.

Health economists Prof Philip Clarke from the University of Melbourne and Dr Barbara de Graaff from the Menzies Institute for Medical Research in Tasmania conducted an analysis for Guardian Australia on the $11,667,253 in pharmaceutical payments made to healthcare professionals.

Under the updated Medicines Australia code of conduct, pharmaceutical companies were required to disclose all payments made to healthcare professionals by 29 August. Previously, this disclosure required the consent of the health practitioners, which in many cases

 

Read More information: http://snip.ly/mulqf#https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2017/sep/12/pharmaceutical-companies-gave-12m-to-doctors-nurses-and-pharmacists

CURE Pharmaceutical Launches New Academic Partnership Program Providing the Company’s Proprietary CureFilm™ for More Humane and Effective Animal Research

OXNARD, Calif., Sept. 06, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — CURE Pharmaceutical (OTCQB:CURR), (“CURE”), a leading disruptive drug delivery technology company, today announced the launch of a new academic partnership program, CureDotsTM. Under the CureDotsTMprogram, academic institutions may access the Company’s patented, multilayer oral thin film (OTF), CureFilm Oral™, for more humane and effective animal research and testing. CureDotsTM are punch-hole dot size versions of CureFilm Oral™ appropriate for pre-clinical testing with smaller animals such as mice.

Translation of a drug to human clinical trials requires that safety and efficacy studies be performed in animal models using the intended clinical route of administration, which is the oral route for many drugs. Oral gavage is the standard method for consistent and precise delivery of an investigational agent to an animal. However, oral gavage is often not well tolerated by the animal causing stress, which can jeopardize the integrity of the experiment.

According to published research by the University of Southern California School of Pharmacy, “Utilizing an Orally Dissolving Strip for Pharmacological and Toxicological Studies: A Simple and Humane Alternative to Oral Gavage for Animals,” preclinical, oral drug delivery using the CureDotsTM represents a safe, convenient, and humane alternative to oral gavage for repetitive pharmacological and toxicological testing performed on animals.

 

Read More: http://snip.ly/sp598#http://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/CURE-Pharmaceutical-Launches-New-Academic-Partnership-Program-Providing-the-Company-s-Proprietary-CureFilm-for-More-Humane-and-Effective-Animal-Research-1002345676

US pharmaceutical company expands Dublin presence

US pharmaceutical company expands Dublin presence

PTC Therapeutics, a US pharmaceutical company, plans to expand its European headquarters in Dublin to 40 staff.

The Dublin site of the company is responsible for finance, quality assurance, legal and a raft of other back office roles.

“We currently employ 30 people in the Dublin office and this will increase to a total of 40 sustainable jobs in this office within a short period of time,” said Adrian Haigh, who heads up the company’s international operations.

PTC focuses on the discovery and commercialisation of novel medicines. It has been working on the development of a drug called Translarna for almost 20 years. The drug is the only protein restoration therapy for the treatment of nonsense mutation Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy – a genetic disorder characterised by progressive muscle degeneration.

 

Read More: http://snip.ly/qmou7#https://www.irishtimes.com/business/health-pharma/us-pharmaceutical-company-expands-dublin-presence-1.3212652

Marketing and promotion of drugs and medical devices

Regulation of the promotional aspects of prescription drugs, biologics, medical devices and biotechnology products with the intention of ensuring that the information contained in the promotion material is not false or misleading is one of the chief objectives of the FDA.

The FDA regulates the promotional materials of all drugs, and this includes both labeling and advertisements. Brochures, booklets, detailing pieces, bulletins, calendars, motion pictures and slides are some of the examples of labeling, while materials published in journals, magazines, other periodicals, and newspapers, and advertisements broadcast through media such as radio, television and telephone communications systems are examples of advertising.

The FDA also regulates another avenue of drug promotion and advertising, namely detailing. This kind of promotion is the one that pharma companies do to doctors in a variety of venues such as medical offices, hospitals, pharmacies, at medical meetings and symposia, academic settings, conferences and other meeting facilities.

The FDA’s reach in monitoring and regulating promotions also covers direct-to-consumer (DTC) prescription drug advertising. In this area, it has complete jurisdiction over prescription drug labeling and advertising and all medical device labeling, but has limited jurisdiction over medical device advertising.

Severe penalties for offenders

For decades, the FDA has been regulating traditional advertising, during the course of which it has been publishing several kinds of guidance documents for industry, and has issued many violation letters. The corrective actions that companies have to implement if the FDA adjudges that drug or medical device promotional material is false or misleading or does not give a proper account of the product needed to enable consumers to weigh the benefits and risks are very expensive and time consuming. They have to carry out expensive remedial advertising, have to cough up huge fines, and also face the prospect of having their reputation sullied on account of these enforcement actions from the FDA.

In addition, it can also criminally prosecute relevant executives of such organizations under the provisions of a strict liability standard. This law gives the government sweeping powers, by which it is not obliged or required to show that the executive facing prosecution had the intention of violating FDA regulations or was knowledgeable about such violations.

The agency has already netted billions of dollars in fines, forfeitures and disgorgements from drug companies for the alleged marketing of a product for unapproved, or “off-label,” uses.

Are the FDA’s laws obsolete?

Yet, the general consensus is that the law governing drug and device marketing is both outmoded and insufficient to deal with the speed at which technology-enabled promotion campaigns appear out of nowhere and disappear in a jiffy. Experts feel that the FDA is still very conservative and traditional in adapting technologies needed for detecting and nailing down such promotion campaigns that technology has brought about. Naturally, the regulatory circles are eager to see how the FDA will deal with the advanced communication technology that goes into promotion campaigns that can make the advertisement go viral and leave the scene just as quickly.

These are important aspects for organizations in the drugs, biologics, medical devices and biotechnology areas. These companies need to be completely aware of the law governing advertising and need to understand the FDA’s thinking on what it considers false and misleading advertising. This knowledge is absolutely essential, considering the broad sweep of powers that the FDA has.

Important learning on the FDA’s approach to promotions and advertising

This important understanding will be imparted at a two-day seminar that is being organized by GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for the areas of regulatory compliance. At this seminar, David R. Dills, Global Regulatory Affairs and Compliance Consultant, who provides regulatory affairs and compliance consultative services, will be the Director. To gain insights into the FDA’s thinking on how it perceives advertisements and promotions as false and misleading, please register for this seminar by visiting Marketing and promotion of drugs and medical devices. This seminar has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

Advertising aimed at healthcare professionals and consumers

Prescription drug promotion is aimed at and delivered to two distinct audiences: Health care professionals (HCPs) and consumers. The FDA recognizes that promotional efforts can provide these audiences important information about the newest developments in drug therapies. So, it insists that such information has to have integrity and completeness.

Also, healthcare professionals, sales representatives and consumers use the social media to discuss the use of prescription products for specific diseases and conditions, a factor that has to be taken into account. David will discuss this and the potential concerns it carries.