Cleaning and Sanitation Training for Food Processors

We will cover several topics of value to food manufacturing sanitation team members. We will begin with a conceptual understanding of cleaning vs. sanitation.

We will then review proper cleaning techniques to ensure microbial and allergen residue removal. Attendees will learn about the chemicals used in industrial cleaning and sanitation and how to protect themselves against harmful exposure and accidents.

Residual Moisture Testing - Proven Techniques.jpg

Why should you attend: The industry has come a long way since the turn of the century, when the poor sanitation practices of many food manufacturing facilities was exposed. Recent events have highlighted the need for even better sanitation. The population has become decidedly more vulnerable and exposed to food borne illnesses linked to manufacturers.

The FDA cited Sunland Inc, the firm that manufactured various nut products recalled this year, for numerous sanitation violations. Failure to properly clean equipment and subsequent salmonella contamination of product resulted in a very poor outcome for this facility. Poor sanitation can also result in allergen cross contamination. Understanding where there are “dead ends” in product flow and difficult to clean areas is important for sanitation personnel to be aware of. What types of cleaning chemicals remove the various types of soils unique to each industry is also critical for an effective sanitation program. Very basic sanitation concepts and practices can make a big difference.

Course Modules & Content Details:

  • Cleaning and Sanitation practices specific to various areas of the manufacturing environment and the resultant risks
  • Types of soils and cleaning chemicals based on the properties of each
  • Results of exposure to hazardous chemicals, how to read labels and maintain chemical safety.

Areas Covered in the Session:

  • Scope of Cleaning and Sanitation
  • Sanitation Regulations and Best Practices
  • Cleaning
  • Chemical Safety
  • Review
  • Closing
  • Self Assessment

Who Will Benefit:

  • Food Manufacturing employees at all levels, especially sanitation and operations/production team members
  • Auditors who review facilities quality assurance programs
  • Customers who want to understand best practices that they should require of their suppliers will benefit
Speaker Profile
Melinda Allen is a Food Safety and Quality Consultant in the Food Industry. Melinda has had a long and dedicated career of Quality Assurance and Food Safety leadership with companies such as YUM Brands and Quiznos. Her consulting clients have included leaders in the field such as Burger King, Panda Express and Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen. She continues to work with many of these and additional clients. Melinda and her team of experienced professionals are available for Quality Assurance and Food Service auditing, Specification and Program Development and Training, Product Commercialization.

6 Ways To Start Improving Your Gut Health Today

Brooke Lark / Unsplash

Considering the rapid rise in kombucha, sauerkraut and probiotic products, it’s pretty clear gut health is on everyone’s minds. And with good reason — more and more research is emerging showing just how important good gut health is for overall wellbeing.

“Having a healthy gut is so important,” accredited practising dietitian and sports dietitian Chloe McLeod told HuffPost Australia.

“It’s linked to a number of different medical conditions. When your gut isn’t healthy it can have an impact on mental health, weight, mood and a number of other digestive disorders. Keeping your gut nice and healthy can help keep the rest of your body healthy.”

Brooke Lark / Unsplash

How do you know if you have good gut health?

“Signs of good gut health include not getting bloating, gas, diarrhoea and constipation,” McLeod said.

“You find you feel better in general — better mood, more energy, a healthy weight and not feeling fatigued. These are all more pronounced when your gut is healthier.”

How do you know if you have bad gut health?

“If you have poor gut health you may have loose, unformed stools, or you’re really constipated, maybe your faeces are foul smelling, you feel gassy, feel foggy headed or have poor mood. These are some of the most common signs,” McLeod explained.

What can negatively affect gut health?

There are a number of diet and lifestyle-related factors which can impact the health of your gut.

“From a nutrition perspective, factors that negatively impact gut health include poor diet, alcohol and having a high fat intake,” McLeod said.

“Also, if you are someone with food intolerances, any large quantity of those trigger foods can have a negative effect on your gut health.

“Being highly stressed all the time impacts cortisol levels, and stress can be a factor for some people. Some medications can also affect gut health.”

 

Read More: http://snip.ly/r70uc#http://www.huffingtonpost.com.au/2017/09/24/6-ways-to-start-improving-your-gut-health-today_a_23218661/

Understanding the FDA’s Latest Regulations for Computer Systems Used in the Tobacco and Related Industries

 Understanding the FDA's Latest Regulations for Computer Systems Used in the Tobacco and Related Industries1Tobacco, an age-old addiction, dishes out some chilling, unpleasant facts. Tobacco is the US’ leading cause of preventable deaths. Between four and five percent of the entire American population -some 16 million people -live with diseases associated with smoking. Cigarette smoking consumes close to half a million American lives every year, about an eleventh of whom never smoked, meaning that they are second hand smokers who contract diseases just by being in close physical proximity of smokers. The harmful effects of smoking are such that at this current rate of smoking; seven percent of all Americans who are alive today will die a premature death. The average lifespan of a smoker is a good decade shorter than that of a nonsmoker.

The FDA intervenes strongly

Understanding the FDA's Latest Regulations for Computer Systems Used in the Tobacco and Related Industries3

Given the gravity of this situation; the FDA formulated a landmark law in August 2016, which vastly improved and expanded its powers to regulate smoking. It builds on an earlier ruling, The Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act of 2009. The law of 2016 arms the FDA with greater powers to enforce laws on smoking, one of the highlights of which is restricting the sale of tobacco products to minors all over the country, since this population is very vulnerable to exposure to smoking.  The FDA now requires proof of age of the buyer of cigarettes, banning the sale of tobacco products through public vending machines, and prohibiting the distribution of free samples to minors.

Other highpoints of this amended legislation include requiring manufacturers of smokeless tobacco products to enter clearer warning signs on the products, requiring them to disclose the contents; strengthens local and state authority in enforcing these laws, and requires manufacturers to provide scientific proof of claims of moderate risk from these tobacco products.

The amended rule aims at hitting producers of tobacco products hard and brings a wide variety of activities under its regulatory net:

  • Mixing e-liquids
  • Manufacturing or modify any type of vaping device
  • Mixing loose tobacco and making it available to smoke in a pipe
  • Rolling or blending tobacco for cigars
  • Manufacturing loose tobacco that enables consumers to roll their own cigarettes
  • Importing of tobacco products
  • Manufacturing of any tobacco product

The FDA’s regulations on cigarettes and other tobacco products also apply to sellers. The main intention of this modified regulation of August 2016 is that it reviews the ingredients of tobacco products that are sold, the ingredients that go into them, and creates awareness of the dangers of these products, all of which were missing in the earlier legislation.

Learning about all aspects of this regulation

Understanding the FDA's Latest Regulations for Computer Systems Used in the Tobacco and Related Industries

A two-day seminar from GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance, will offer a complete explanation of this law. Carolyn Troiano, IT Program Manager and FDA Compliance Consultant, Smart Resources, Inc., who has more than 35 years of experience in the tobacco, pharmaceutical, medical device and other FDA-regulated industries, will be the Director of this seminar. This seminar has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

This seminar will describe the best practices for developing a compliance strategy, including roles and responsibilities, and the policies and procedures that should be followed to ensure compliance.

Understanding the FDA's Latest Regulations for Computer Systems Used in the Tobacco and Related Industries4

She will cover the following areas at this seminar:

  • FDA Tobacco Control Act
  • Extension of FDA oversight to Vapor, e-Cigarette, Cigar and other industries
  • Details of the August 8, 2016 FDA “Deeming” Regulation
  • Pre-Marketing Tobacco Application (PMTA) Submission
  • FDA Oversight and Compliance Strategy
  • Computer System Validation (CSV) and the System Development Life Cycle Methodology (SDLC)
  • Cost vs. Compliance
  • Policies and Procedures
  • Leveraging Vendors
  • Industry Best Practices
  • FDA Trends.

Understanding the FDA’s Latest Regulations for Computer Systems Used in the Tobacco and Related Industries

 

Foreign Material Control – A basic understanding

Foreign Material Control – A basic understanding

Foreign Material (FM) Control is often a source of major problem for the food industry in the US, as a good part of consumer complaints across the food industry in the country relates to FM inclusion in finished food products. This issue has been one of considerable debate too, in not only the industry, but society itself as a whole. It involves food, without which no human can survive, and hence the controversy.

What is FM?

Foreign material control has a major impact on business in the US. Detection of above permissible foreign material control has resulted in market withdrawals, meaning expensive costs for the business doing it. The controversy starts with defining what “foreign material” is in the industry’s context. It can be broadly defined as foreign objects and/or extraneous matter found in food that the consumer has not expected or has not been informed about. Not everyone is agreed on this definition of foreign material control, because there is a high level of subjectivity and interpretability over the critical terms of this definition.

Definitions in the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act

There are various definitions of FM in the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act:

–        402(a) (1): “a food shall be deemed to be adulterated if it bears or contains any poisonous or deleterious substance which may render it injurious to health.”

–        According to the 402(a) (3), “a food shall be deemed to be adulterated if it consists in whole or in part of any filthy, putrid, or decomposed substance, or if it is otherwise unfit for food.”

–        402(a) (4) details that “a food shall be deemed to be adulterated if it has been prepared, packed, or held under insanitary conditions whereby it may have become contaminated with filth, or whereby it may have been rendered injurious to health.”

Reference:

http://www.foodsafetymagazine.com/article.asp?id=291&sub=sub1

 

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