Good Documentation Practice Guideline is simple: just write

Good Documentation Practices are the soul of many regulated industries. The FDA, like all other regulatory agencies, makes GDP a central element of its regulations, and bases it on the principle of evidence. For the FDA and other regulatory agencies across the world, what is not documented is nonexistent.

Good Documentation Practices are essential for a number of disciplines. The soul of documentation is, naturally, the written word. What happens when something that happened is not actually written down? It is a work of no practical use, because apart from those that carried out the particular undocumented task; no one else is aware of it. And even when the people who did that task or were witness to it are prone to have their own interpretation and perception of what was done. This is why proof in the form of writing is the most important element of Good Documentation Practices.

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What to write, and how toGDP should not only be about just writing down; it is about what to write and also, how, meaning, in what manner. If there has been an intervention in any method of manufacture or any other activity in the regulated industries; the change should be noted down in the proper format as prescribed by the FDA. This enables everyone concerned, from the people in the organization to the auditors to the regulatory agencies, to clearly identify what action was carried out, by whom and when. This further leads to a discovery of the impact of the actions. This is the key to determining the effectiveness of the application of the GDP principles in the particular case.

goodDocumentationPracticesGuidelinesThis is why the FDA has very clear-cut requirements and expectations of GDP from the industries it regulates. These clearly explain the method by which to document the said document, the ways of doing it, and what actions to take when the need arises.

Quality Assurance is unthinkable without the application of GDP principles. The main reason for establishing GDP is ensure that the documentation does the following to the record in question:

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What needs to be documented?Another major element of GDP is to determine what is to be documented. The FDA and other regulatory agencies require the principles of Good Documentation Practices to be applied across a number of activities at different stages. These include:

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The EMA’s requirements
goodDocumentationPracticesGuidelinesThe EMA also has clear-cut guidelines on Good Documentation Practices. Some of its core requirements relate to

  • Specifications
  • All aspects of the manufacturing including the product’s formulae, the way in which the processing was done, the methods of its packaging, and the extent to which its testing instructions are written down
  • SOPs
  • Protocols
  • Technical agreements

Further, most regulatory agencies have their own requirements with regard to the styling, ways by which the amendments, if any, need to be jotted down, the type of ink to be used, the way in which the review, if any, needs to be entered, and who should put signatures and where, so on. Manufacturers who fall under the purview of respective regulatory agencies need to adhere to these.

And, for other reasons, as wellImplementing Good Documentation Practices is a great idea to have for meeting regulatory requirements, because companies that do not meet these requirements are in a spot of bother about a number of issues. However, in addition to this, there is also the need for maintaining GDP for business reasons, as well. A business that complies with the requirements set out by the FDA or other regulatory agencies in relation to Good laboratory practices, the CFR regulations such as 21 CFR Parts that apply to various industries, and also as required as part of national and global agencies; earns a good name in the market and is considered a reliable company.

 

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FDA approves first commercial product for peanut allergy prevention

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The approach towards preventing peanut allergies has changed dramatically in recent years. Now the US Food and Drug Administration has approved the first commercial product, called Hello, Peanut!, to help inform the public that early peanut introduction and regular consumption can reduce the risk of peanut allergy in young children.

The Hello, Peanut! introduction kit offers convenience in the form of packets of peanut powder blended with oat given in increasing quantities for seven days, as long as children tolerate it well. After which maintenance packets are recommended for use up to three times a week. The introduction kit is $25, and the maintenance kit sells for $20 for eight packets.

The FDA decision was informed by the landmark Learning Early About Peanut Allergy study published in 2015. It showed that high-risk children who regularly consumed peanut in infancy had far fewer peanut allergies by age 5 than their counterparts who avoided peanut over the same span of time. This understanding led to new guidelines published in 2017 by National Institutes of Health about giving peanut to babies to protect against peanut allergy.

Infants who have severe eczema or egg allergy are considered at high-risk of developing a peanut allergy. By offering peanut early in life – between 4-6 months of age – and continuing with regular consumption, we can prevent the onset of peanut allergy in many of these children. High-risk children should see their doctor before parents introduce peanut protein in any form. The physician may decide to do skin or blood testing.  If the test is negative, age-appropriate peanut products can be given at home. However, if a child tests positive, introduction to peanut is done under clinical supervision. If the child is deemed already allergic to peanuts, the guidelines recommend strict avoidance of peanut and ready access to epinephrine auto-injectors.

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FDA Breaks New Ground With First Approved Gene Therapy for Cancer

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When oncologist Dr. Carl June heard the Food and Drug Administration’s decision to bring the first gene therapy to market in the US, he pinched himself, hard.

“It was so improbable that this would ever be a commercially approved therapy,” he said, voice breaking with emotion.

June was referring to a revolutionary cancer therapy that he helped bring from lab bench to market. Co-developed with the drug giant Novartis, the therapy, CAR-T, genetically alters a patient’s own immune cells to target and destroy cancer cells.

Recently, in a historic decision, the FDA threw their support behind Kymriah (tisagenlecleucel), a “living drug” that is designed to treat blood and bone marrow cancer in children that, even with aggressive chemotherapy, is often lethal.

An entire process rather than a packaged pill, the therapy harvests a patient’s own immune cells—T cells that patrol and destroy abnormal cells—retrains them with extra bits of genetic code, and turns them into torpedoes aimed at cancerous cells once reintroduced into patients’ bodies.

“We’re entering a new frontier in medical innovation with the ability to reprogram a patient’s own cells to attack a deadly cancer,” said FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb in a statement, adding that the therapy is “the first gene therapy available in the United States.”

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FDA advisors give a thumbs-up to GlaxoSmithKline’s shingles vaccine

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GlaxoSmithKline’s shingles Shingrix vaccine received an unanimous vote of support by a Food and Drug Administration advisory committee Wednesday on safety and effectiveness to be used in adults 50 and older.

A decision by the FDA to commercialize Shingrix is expected later this year. The agency usually follows the recommendations of its advisory panels.

GSK said in June that the vaccine produced a strong immune response in adults 65 and older who had previously been vaccinated against shingles with Merck’s vaccine, Zostavax. Scientific data published in the New England Journal of Medicine showed that the effectiveness of Merck’s vaccine wanes over time, while GSK’s vaccine appeared to have longer-lasting protection.

GSK said data show that people who received Merck’s vaccine, the only one approved now for the herpes zoster (shingles) vaccine, can later receive the Shingrix vaccine safely and effectively.

“The risk of developing shingles increases with age and it is estimated that up to one in three people in the United States will develop shingles,” said Emmanuel Hanon, GSK head of vaccines research and development. “Today’s vote brings us one step closer to approval of Shingrix, which is specifically designed to overcome age-related weakening of the immune system.”

 

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A Tour of the FDA 2017

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A tour of the FDA is something like a snapshot of what the FDA does. The importance of the FDA can never be understated: It regulates products from the proverbial pin to airplane in the food, medical devices, pharma and healthcare industries, which touch almost every aspect of American lives. The products that the FDA regulates account for about a trillion dollars, which make up about a quarter of all goods traded in the US.

So, what is a tour of the FDA like?

A tour of the FDA helps to get a broad understanding of the this regulatory body and get some idea of the various departments it has, as well as the functions of these departments. To get an understanding of what the FDA does, a reference to its mission statement could give some direction:

“(The) FDA is responsible for protecting the public health by assuring the safety, efficacy and security of human and veterinary drugs, biological products, medical devices, our nation’s food supply, cosmetics, and products that emit radiation.” This is just the opening line of the FDA’s mission statement. Reference to its other statements, which have now included a reference to containing terrorism, will serve as a good guide to a tour of the FDA. In short, the FDA regulates nearly every item used and consumed by the American public.

The history of the FDA

The legal sanction for carrying out its mission is mandated by the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act). An amazing fact that a tour of the FDA reveals is that it is one of the oldest regulatory bodies in the world, with its earliest jurisdiction having covered regulation of drugs in the year 1848. The Department of Agriculture, to which President James Polk appointed noted chemist Charles Wetherill, can be considered the earliest endeavor to regulate medical products of daily use in the US.

How is the FDA organized?

A tour of the FDA is incomplete without a reference to the way it is organized. Its structure consists of this hierarchy:

  • Office of the Commissioner
  • Office of Foods and Veterinary Medicine
  • Office of Global Regulatory Operations and Policy
  • Office of Medical Products and Tobacco
  • Office of Operations

Under these broad heads, a tour of the FDA shows the way into which it is divided into several offices and organizations. Important among these include:

  • Office of Regulatory Affairs (ORA)
  • Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN)
  • Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER)
  • Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)
  • Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH)
  • Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH)
  • National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR)

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The FDA’s requirements for Drug Applications and Submissions

The FDA has set out requirements by which it accepts drug applications and submissions. It accepts drug applications and submissions through two formats, the New Drug Application (NDA) and Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA). The NDA and the ANDA are the mediums through which the FDA eventually approves drug applications and submissions.

The NDA process

The NDA is one the two mechanisms through which the FDA accepts drug applications and submissions. This application is available with the FDA. Any sponsor of a clinical study, be it an organization or an individual, can apply for the NDA and can submit the same, when it is convinced that it has sufficient evidence that its study meets the FDA’ requirements for marketing approval.

The way to go about filing for an NDA as part of drug applications and submissions is this:

The ANDA process

The ANDA is the other method of drug applications and submissions to the FDA. Being the counterpart of the NDA; the ANDA is the application a company makes for getting a generic drug approved by the FDA for marketing. The ANDA also has to contain the same data as contained in the NDA drug applications and submissions, but is not required to be accompanied by the data of the clinical research. It is for this reason that they are called by their name.

In place of the clinical research data, the ANDA format of drug applications and submissions has to contain evidence that the product has the ability to perform the same functions of the original drug. This is called the drug’s bioequivalent value. Like in the case of the NDA, the ANDA too is allocated a reference number as part of its drug applications and submissions.

Common factors taken into consideration

In either of these methods, the primary considerations for the FDA include the following:

  • The safety and effectiveness of the drug
  • Its ability to meet its intended use
  • Its ability of its benefits to outweigh its risks
  • The appropriateness of the drug’s planned labeling and its contents
  • The ability of the methods used in the manufacturing of the drug to meet Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)
  • The capacity of the drug to have to controls in place for maintaining its quality, purity, strength and identity

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GlobalCompliancePanel announces Seasonal offers for Professionals with Flat 50% OFF on all Seminars

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Do celebrations need a cause and a reason? Yes, and GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for the regulatory compliance areas, is having a solid cause and reason for doing so. It is celebrating the many years of its relationship with its customers spread all over the world by offering its trainings at a massive 50% discount!

Yes, that is right. GlobalCompliancePanel’s seminars will be available for a huge 50% discount till April 30. Regulatory professionals who want to augment their knowledge of regulatory compliance can now do so by paying just half the price of these trainings from GlobalCompliancePanel. All that is needed to do walk away with a rare offer such as this is to visit https://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/seminar?wordpress_SEO and use MGCP50 Promo Code.

This offer is valid till April 30, 2017. Regulatory professionals who want to take any of GlobalCompliancePanel’s trainings can book their trainings for an area of their interest by this date. From April 1 onwards, this offer will cease, meaning that the original price will apply from then.

So, why is GlobalCompliancePanel offering this discount? It is for a simple, but profound reason: It wants to thank its huge customer base for the support they have been extending to this company over the many years for which it has been in business. During the course of the 10 years for which GlobalCompliancePanel has been in business, it has trained thousands of regulatory compliance professionals from around the world.

These professionals, belonging to such varied geographies as the US and Japan and India and Canada, have been able to meet their regulatory compliance challenges on account of these trainings. These trainings are relevant, focused and valuable, and are from some of the best known regulatory compliance Experts found anywhere on this planet.

It is these trainings that have been hoping these professionals in the regulatory compliance arena gain more insights into regulations from the FDA, the EMA and other such bodies around the world. These trainings have been consistently helping them to meet these challenges, as they give them a better and sharper understanding of the implementing these requirements.

These regulatory requirements can pose hurdles to the most experienced and brightest of regulatory compliance professionals in the medical devices, pharmaceutical, life sciences and food and biologicals areas, but not to those who undertake professional trainings from GlobalCompliancePanel. GlobalCompliancePanel’s panel of experts is here to help them overcome these challenges and hurdles.

This trend has been being witnessed from the time GlobalCompliancePanel entered the line of professional trainings. Any wonder then, that no fewer than 50,000 professionals have benefited from these trainings? What could be a better way of thanking such a huge base of customers than with this offer? GlobalCompliancePanel believes that a celebration should also be useful, and this is that this offer is!

Hurry up and enroll today. Happy learning!