Cleaning and Sanitation Training for Food Processors

We will cover several topics of value to food manufacturing sanitation team members. We will begin with a conceptual understanding of cleaning vs. sanitation.

We will then review proper cleaning techniques to ensure microbial and allergen residue removal. Attendees will learn about the chemicals used in industrial cleaning and sanitation and how to protect themselves against harmful exposure and accidents.

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Why should you attend: The industry has come a long way since the turn of the century, when the poor sanitation practices of many food manufacturing facilities was exposed. Recent events have highlighted the need for even better sanitation. The population has become decidedly more vulnerable and exposed to food borne illnesses linked to manufacturers.

The FDA cited Sunland Inc, the firm that manufactured various nut products recalled this year, for numerous sanitation violations. Failure to properly clean equipment and subsequent salmonella contamination of product resulted in a very poor outcome for this facility. Poor sanitation can also result in allergen cross contamination. Understanding where there are “dead ends” in product flow and difficult to clean areas is important for sanitation personnel to be aware of. What types of cleaning chemicals remove the various types of soils unique to each industry is also critical for an effective sanitation program. Very basic sanitation concepts and practices can make a big difference.

Course Modules & Content Details:

  • Cleaning and Sanitation practices specific to various areas of the manufacturing environment and the resultant risks
  • Types of soils and cleaning chemicals based on the properties of each
  • Results of exposure to hazardous chemicals, how to read labels and maintain chemical safety.

Areas Covered in the Session:

  • Scope of Cleaning and Sanitation
  • Sanitation Regulations and Best Practices
  • Cleaning
  • Chemical Safety
  • Review
  • Closing
  • Self Assessment

Who Will Benefit:

  • Food Manufacturing employees at all levels, especially sanitation and operations/production team members
  • Auditors who review facilities quality assurance programs
  • Customers who want to understand best practices that they should require of their suppliers will benefit
Speaker Profile
Melinda Allen is a Food Safety and Quality Consultant in the Food Industry. Melinda has had a long and dedicated career of Quality Assurance and Food Safety leadership with companies such as YUM Brands and Quiznos. Her consulting clients have included leaders in the field such as Burger King, Panda Express and Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen. She continues to work with many of these and additional clients. Melinda and her team of experienced professionals are available for Quality Assurance and Food Service auditing, Specification and Program Development and Training, Product Commercialization.

Is your organization a part of the food chain?

The exploding and irreversible pace of globalization has brought in its wake changes in almost all areas of human activity. Goods and commodities that were once confined to one’s local area have now started reaching out to the unlikeliest corners of the world. One of the most active and important of such items to undergo a sea change in the way it is produced and consumed is food.

What we need every few hours, and was available and restricted to local use has now smashed boundaries. Finding a Mexican restaurant in Japan or a Chinese one in Canada is common. At the base of such drastic change in the food supply chain is the need for hygiene standards.

 

A single standard for global food?

In the last couple of decades or so since the phenomenal and hitherto unseen way in which the countries and markets of the world are getting closer to each other; the need for a uniform, global standard that regulates food standards has become a critical need. Again, this is a little problematic, because food, as we know, is very varied. It is as heterogeneous as mankind. So, is having a single Standard going to make sense?

It may not, but this does not obviate the need for a pan-food supply chain, global Standard for food safety. In fact, its need is greater than ever before now, with the changed times, when the boundaries of food movement have thinned down like never before. It is with the intention of standardizing standards across the food supply chain that ISO 22000 was born.

Certification

ISO left it to The Foundation for Food Safety Certification to establish strict systems for the effective implementation and rigorous auditing and maintenance of the standard combination. It is supported by the Confederation of the Food and Drink Industries of the European Union.

Being a certification scheme, The Food Safety System Certification 22000 or FSSC 22000 comprises ISO 22000 and ISO/TS 22002-1. It sets out a number of impartial Standards for manufacturers and others in the food supply chain to ensure quality standards. At its core, it insists on the PDCA (Plan, Do, Check, Act) methodology for the food supply chain. ISO 22000:2005 sets out the requirements for a food safety management system where any organization that is part of the food chain has to demonstrate its ability to control food safety hazards. This is to make sure that food is safe at the time it is being consumed by humans.  It applies to primary producers, processors, manufacturers, food and related service providers, and product suppliers.

References:

http://www.iso.org/iso/catalogue_detail?csnumber=35466

http://www.praxiom.com/iso-22000-intro.htm

http://arcms.ie/home/health-and-safety-systems/iso-22000-food-safety-management-system/