FDA approves first commercial product for peanut allergy prevention

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The approach towards preventing peanut allergies has changed dramatically in recent years. Now the US Food and Drug Administration has approved the first commercial product, called Hello, Peanut!, to help inform the public that early peanut introduction and regular consumption can reduce the risk of peanut allergy in young children.

The Hello, Peanut! introduction kit offers convenience in the form of packets of peanut powder blended with oat given in increasing quantities for seven days, as long as children tolerate it well. After which maintenance packets are recommended for use up to three times a week. The introduction kit is $25, and the maintenance kit sells for $20 for eight packets.

The FDA decision was informed by the landmark Learning Early About Peanut Allergy study published in 2015. It showed that high-risk children who regularly consumed peanut in infancy had far fewer peanut allergies by age 5 than their counterparts who avoided peanut over the same span of time. This understanding led to new guidelines published in 2017 by National Institutes of Health about giving peanut to babies to protect against peanut allergy.

Infants who have severe eczema or egg allergy are considered at high-risk of developing a peanut allergy. By offering peanut early in life – between 4-6 months of age – and continuing with regular consumption, we can prevent the onset of peanut allergy in many of these children. High-risk children should see their doctor before parents introduce peanut protein in any form. The physician may decide to do skin or blood testing.  If the test is negative, age-appropriate peanut products can be given at home. However, if a child tests positive, introduction to peanut is done under clinical supervision. If the child is deemed already allergic to peanuts, the guidelines recommend strict avoidance of peanut and ready access to epinephrine auto-injectors.

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FDA Finalizes Guidance on Interoperable Medical Devices

On September 6, 2017, FDA finalized a guidance document entitled “Design Considerations and Pre-Market Submission Recommendations for Interoperable Medical Devices” (“Final Guidance”). In the Final Guidance, the agency outlines design considerations for manufacturers when developing interoperable medical devices, as well as recommendations about information to include in premarket submissions and device labeling. Interoperability of devices can encourage the availability and sharing of information across systems, even when products from different manufacturers are used. A draft of this guidance was issued on January 26, 2016.

The Final Guidance defines “interoperable medical devices” as medical devices “that have the ability to exchange and use information through an electronic interface with another medical/non-medical product, system, or device.” These functions can consist of a one-way data transmission to another device or product, or more complex interactions in which command and control is exercised over another device. An “electronic interface” is defined as the medium by which systems communicate with each other, and includes both the type of connection and the information content.

According to the Final Guidance, the agency considers the management of risks associated with an electronic interface incorporated into a medical device to be part of a comprehensive quality system under 21 C.F.R. Part 820. Manufacturers of interoperable medical devices should perform a risk analysis and conduct appropriate testing addressing the risks associated with interoperability, the anticipated users, reasonably foreseeable misuse, and reasonably foreseeable combinations of events that can result in a hazardous situation. In particular, the Final Guidance identifies the following considerations that manufacturers should take into account and “appropriately tailor[]” to the device’s interface technology, intended use, and use environments

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FDA Breaks New Ground With First Approved Gene Therapy for Cancer

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When oncologist Dr. Carl June heard the Food and Drug Administration’s decision to bring the first gene therapy to market in the US, he pinched himself, hard.

“It was so improbable that this would ever be a commercially approved therapy,” he said, voice breaking with emotion.

June was referring to a revolutionary cancer therapy that he helped bring from lab bench to market. Co-developed with the drug giant Novartis, the therapy, CAR-T, genetically alters a patient’s own immune cells to target and destroy cancer cells.

Recently, in a historic decision, the FDA threw their support behind Kymriah (tisagenlecleucel), a “living drug” that is designed to treat blood and bone marrow cancer in children that, even with aggressive chemotherapy, is often lethal.

An entire process rather than a packaged pill, the therapy harvests a patient’s own immune cells—T cells that patrol and destroy abnormal cells—retrains them with extra bits of genetic code, and turns them into torpedoes aimed at cancerous cells once reintroduced into patients’ bodies.

“We’re entering a new frontier in medical innovation with the ability to reprogram a patient’s own cells to attack a deadly cancer,” said FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb in a statement, adding that the therapy is “the first gene therapy available in the United States.”

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FDA advisors give a thumbs-up to GlaxoSmithKline’s shingles vaccine

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GlaxoSmithKline’s shingles Shingrix vaccine received an unanimous vote of support by a Food and Drug Administration advisory committee Wednesday on safety and effectiveness to be used in adults 50 and older.

A decision by the FDA to commercialize Shingrix is expected later this year. The agency usually follows the recommendations of its advisory panels.

GSK said in June that the vaccine produced a strong immune response in adults 65 and older who had previously been vaccinated against shingles with Merck’s vaccine, Zostavax. Scientific data published in the New England Journal of Medicine showed that the effectiveness of Merck’s vaccine wanes over time, while GSK’s vaccine appeared to have longer-lasting protection.

GSK said data show that people who received Merck’s vaccine, the only one approved now for the herpes zoster (shingles) vaccine, can later receive the Shingrix vaccine safely and effectively.

“The risk of developing shingles increases with age and it is estimated that up to one in three people in the United States will develop shingles,” said Emmanuel Hanon, GSK head of vaccines research and development. “Today’s vote brings us one step closer to approval of Shingrix, which is specifically designed to overcome age-related weakening of the immune system.”

 

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Tips and Suggestions on interacting with FDA Officials and Premarket Approval (PMA)

Preparing premarket submissions that win regulatory approval is a complex task, even for the most seasoned professional in the medical devices industry. This is because of the highly stringent nature of the regulatory approval pathways, namely the Premarket Approval (PMA) process and FDA regulatory 510(k) clearance.

What makes preparing premarket submissions that win regulatory approval challenging? It is the fact, acknowledged by the FDA itself, that the PMA is the most stringent type of device marketing application required by the FDA. The PMA should be secured from the FDA before the company markets the medical device. The FDA gives its approval of the PMA for a Class II medical device only after it determines that all the elements necessary for assuring that the application has enough scientific confirmation that it is safe and effective for the intended uses it is going to be put to. Preparing premarket submissions thus is an onerous task by any stretch of imagination.

Another element of preparing premarket submissions that win regulatory approval

Another aspect of preparing premarket submissions is the 510 (k). The 510 (k) is essentially a kind of premarket submission that is made to the FDA to show that the device that a manufacturer intends to market is at least as effective and safe as a legally marketed device of its equivalence, already in the market, that is not subject to PMA. The FDA calls this principle the substantial equivalency (SE) and the device that is used as the reference for equivalence, the predicate device. The requirements governing SE are contained in 21 CFR 807.92(a) (3).

On top of all these, regulatory professionals have the responsibility of creating preparing premarket submissions that should not only convincingly demonstrate the ways of stating and explaining regulatory arguments for their device to the U.S. FDA reviewer for getting the approval; they should also be presentable and well-organized, without being cluttered or confusing.

Professional trainings for preparing premarket submissions that win regulatory approval

Given all these, it goes without saying that a completely thorough understanding and knowledge of the relevant U.S. FDA laws, regulations and requirements is absolutely necessary for regulatory professionals. This in-depth understanding can be had only from thorough training, which is indispensable if the medical device company is to win a clearance or approval.

The ways by which to do this is the core learning a two-day seminar from GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for the regulatory compliance areas, will impart. The Director of this seminar is Subhash Patel, a very senior regulatory professional and founder of New Jersey-based MD Reg Consulting LLC, which serves medical device industry clients in all aspects of global regulatory affairs specific to their needs.

To enroll for this highly valuable training session on how to successfully prepare 510(k)/Pre-IDE/IDE and PMA premarket submissions that secure clearances and approvals from the FDA, please register for this seminar by visiting Tips and Suggestions on interacting with FDA Officials and Premarket Approval (PMA) . This seminar has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

The grasp needed for preparing premarket submission that win regulatory approval

At this seminar, Patel will demonstrate the grasp that regulatory professionals in the medical devices industry need for working with the FDA officials during the review and approval process of their submission. He will offer a complete understanding of the major aspects of FDA premarket submissions.

While knowledge of the regulatory process is one thing; medical device companies also need to know how to set and state regulatory arguments for their device in a most convincing manner to the FDA reviewer. This knowledge will be part of this course. In the process of explaining how to prepare premarket submissions that win regulatory approval; Patel will also offer tips and suggestions to participants on how to work effectively with the U.S. FDA officials during review and approval process of their submission.

During the course of these two days, Patel will cover the following core elements of how to prepare premarket submissions. He will explain the following:

o  History and background of U.S FDA Laws and Regulations

o  Classify Your Device

o  Choose the Correct Premarket Submission for your device

o  Compile the Appropriate Information for your Premarket Submission

o  Author and Prepare your Premarket Submission

o  Submit your Premarket Submission to the FDA

o  Interact with FDA Staff during Review and Approval

o  Complete the Establishment Registration and Device Listing