Medical Device Recalls: How to Properly, Compliantly and Promptly Deal with a Recall

It will be beneficial to all device manufacturers and is recommended for any individuals or teams that are involved in post marketing of medical devices. 

The Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act) authorizes FDA to order recalls of medical devices, under certain circumstances (e.g., situations involving serious and immediate hazards to health) and controls.  With very few exceptions, device recalls by companies are voluntary.

There are three regulations promulgated by FDA that define their authority and the requirements applicable to device manufacturers and importers for the correction or removal-collectively known as recall-of medical devices; the requirements for these regulations are outlined in 21 CFR §7, 21 CFR §806, and 21 CFR §810. Each of these regulations is presented in detail in the following pages. Compliance with these three regulations also touches upon other regulations administered by FDA.

Failure to properly report events and take corrective and removal actions can cause costly problems for a manufacturer and can be life threating for consumer. The number of device companies having their recall classified as a Class 1 (most severe) has surged in the past three years.  We will take the time to interact though the day to navigate all aspect of the recall process

This course will provide understanding recall compliance and the interrelationship on Complaint Handling, CAPA, and Risk Management processes. It will be beneficial to all device manufacturers and is recommended for any individuals or teams that are involved in post marketing of medical devices.

Join Rita Hoffman, RAC an expert in the field of Post-Market Compliance.  Not only will you learn from her over her 40 years in both FDA as a Compliance Officer and Ombudsman, learning from her stories of what not to do, but you will take back a desktop manual on Post-Market reference guide.

Areas covered by the Instructor:

Determine what actions are taken in a medical device recall

  • Cite the regulatory requirements for recalls/ field actions regarding medical devices
  • Reference and use medical device recall authority and guidance documents
  • Identify and understand the applicable regulatory standards and guidance documents
  • Identify the different recall types and classifications
  • Explain what types of communications are required
  • Define what effectiveness checks are
  • Outline the steps required to terminate a recall and what regulatory reports and records are required for a device recall
  • Understand how to comply with complicated Compliant Handling, MDR and Recall requirements
  • Firms MDR reporting and FDA’s handling of MDR reports
  • Company preparation in the event of a Recall, recall strategy, notification letter and communicating with the FDA
  • Minimize your risk of regulatory enforcement actions
  • Understand the relationship and interaction with other quality system elements as they relate to complaints and reportable events
  • Walk-through of case examples
  • Discussion of FDA’s New Guidance’s on Risk and how it interacts with Recalls

Good Laboratory Practices (GLPs) Comparing and Contrasting GMP

Non-clinical laboratory studies in which tests article are studied in test system under laboratory conditions to determine their safety.

To compare and contrast between Good Laboratory Practices and Good Manufacturing practices.

Good Laboratory Practices (GLPs), 21 CFR part 58 are not set of guidelines but they are regulations for conducting nonclinical laboratory studies that support or are intended to support applications for research or marketing permits for products such as food and color additives, human and animal drugs, medical devices for human use, biological products and electronic products that are regulated by the FDA.

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GLPs are enforceable by law. They do not include manufacturing of product. GLPS are for non-clinical laboratory studies in which tests article are studied in test system under laboratory conditions to determine their safety. This does not include studies utilizing human subjects, or clinical studies, or field trials on animals.

  • What are Good Laboratory Practices
  • Why were they created
  • What is the objective of GLPs and how are they associated with GMPs and SOPs
  • Statistical procedures for data evaluation
  • Instrumentation validation
  • Analytical and laboratory certification
  • Documentation and maintenance of records
  • Consequences of noncompliance
  • Disqualification and reinstatement

Who will be benefited by this

  • Quality Assurance Personnel
  • Quality Control Personnel
  • Research and Development Personnel
  • Regulatory Affairs Personnel
  • Project Managers
  • Manufacturing Managers
  • Validation Engineers
  • Internal Auditing Personnel
  • Microbiology Personnel
  • Auditors

Instructor Joy McElroy With over 20 years total experience in the pharmaceutical and biotech industries, Joy has gained extensive knowledge of Quality Assurance, Process and Cleaning Validation, and Equipment Qualification. She has written and executed Equipment Qualification and Validation Protocols for numerous Companies such as Mallinckrodt, Wyeth Lederle, Merck, BioMerieux, Catalent, and Phillips Medisize. 

Her knowledge, experience, and strong work ethic have made her a highly sought-after engineer in both the pharmaceutical and biotech industries. Joy specializes in Equipment Qualification, Sterilization, Cleaning Validation, and GMP Compliance Auditing.

Medical Device Adverse Event Reporting Systems in EU, Canada and US

Medical device firms’ obligation doesn’t end upon obtaining a marketing clearance, approval, or certificates. Medical device manufacturers are required to report adverse events to the authorities (e.g., Competent Authorities, Health Canada and US FDA), where applicable.

To achieve compliance and to remain compliant with the adverse event reporting requirements, it is imperative that medical device manufacturers understand what requirements apply and how to meet the said requirements.

This webinar will walk you through to help you understand and stay in conformity with the adverse event reporting requirements in EU, Canada and US.

This webinar will help you profoundly change your way of planning, developing, implementing and following your relevant and applicable processes in a more efficient and effective manner.

Why should you attend : Medical device manufacturers are required to report adverse events to the authorities (e.g., Competent Authorities, Health Canada and US FDA), where applicable.

To achieve compliance and to remain compliant with the adverse event reporting requirements, it is critical to accurately interpret and understand what requirements apply and how to meet the said requirements.

This webinar will walk you through to help you understand and stay in conformity with the adverse event reporting requirements in EU, Canada and US.

Areas Covered in the Session

  • Applicable and relevant regulations in EU, Canada and US
  • Definitions
  • Medical device adverse event reporting requirements in EU, Canada and US.
  • Medical device vigilance system during the post-production phase in EU.
  • Mandatory medical device problem reporting requirements in Canada.
  • Mandatory medical device reporting requirements in US.
  • Review of actual reporting forms in EU, Canada and US
  • Applicable and relevant guidance documents
  • Conclusion

Who Will Benefit:

  • Regulatory Affairs Managers, Directors and VPs
  • Clinical Affairs Managers, Directors and VPs
  • Quality Managers, Directors and VPs
  • Quality Managers, Directors and VPs
  • Compliance Managers and Directors
  • Sales and Marketing Managers, Directors, and VPs
  • Complaint Handling and Risk Management Managers and Directors
  • Site Managers, Directors, and Consultants
  • Senior and Executive Management
  • Compliance Officers and Legal Counsel
  • Business Development Managers, Directors, and VPs

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Best Biostatistics Tips You Will Read This Year

How do you know if you are pressing the right key, let alone performing the best test?

Statistics is a useful decision making tool in the clinical research arena. When working in a field where a p-value can determine the next steps on development of a drug or procedure, it is imperative that decision makers understand the theory and application of statistics.

Many statistical softwares are now available to professionals. However, these softwares were developed for statisticians and can often be daunting to non-statisticians. How do you know if you are pressing the right key, let alone performing the best test?

biostatistics

This seminar provides a non-mathematical introduction to biostatistics and is designed for non-statisticians. And it will benefit professionals who must understand and work with study design and interpretation of findings in a clinical or biotechnology setting.

The focus of the seminar is to give you the information and skills necessary to understand statistical concepts and findings as applies to clinical research, and to confidently convey the information to others.

Emphasis will be placed on the actual statistical (a) concepts, (b) application, and (c) interpretation, and not on mathematical formulas or actual data analysis. A basic understanding of statistics is desired, but not necessary.

  • Physicians
  • Clinical Research Associates
  • Clinical Project Managers/Leaders
  • Sponsors
  • Regulatory Professionals who use statistical concepts/terminology in reporting
  • Medical Writers who need to interpret statistical reports

High degree of Assurance in its Manufacturing Process to Justify Commercial Distribution of the Product

Focuses on how to establish a systematic approach to implementing statistical methodologies into a process validation program consistent with the FDA guidance.

The guidance further delineates the ‘process design stage through commercial production’ into three distinct stages of the product lifecycle:

Stage 1: Process Design: The commercial manufacturing process is defined during this stage based on knowledge gained through development and scale-up activities.

Stage 2: Process Qualification: During this stage, the process design is evaluated to determine if the process is capable of reproducible commercial manufacturing.

Stage 3: Continued Process Verification: Ongoing assurance is gained during routine production that the process remains in a state of control.

The first stage of process validation is process design. The Process Validation guidance document states, “A successful validation program depends on information and knowledge from product and process development. This knowledge and understanding is the basis for establishing an approach to control of a manufacturing process that results in products with desired quality attributes:

Manufactures should:

  • Understand the sources of variation
  • Detect the presence and degree of variation
  • Understand the impact of variation on the process and ultimately on product attributes
  • Control the variation in a manner commensurate with the risk it represents to the process and product.”

The second stage of process validation is process qualification. Although stage 2 has two elements, this course will focus on recommendations for the second element, PPQ. PPQ “combines the actual facility, utilities, equipment (each now qualified), and the trained personnel with the commercial manufacturing process, control procedures, and components to produce commercial batches.” Additionally, the process validation guidance document that “Each manufacturer should judge whether it has gained sufficient understanding to provide a high degree of assurance in its manufacturing process to justify commercial distribution of the product. Focusing exclusively on qualification efforts without understanding the manufacturing process and associated variations may not lead to adequate assurance of quality.”

The third stage of process validation is continued process verification. The process validation guidance document defines the need for this stage: “After establishing and confirming the process, manufacturers must maintain the process in a state of control over the life of the process, even as materials, equipment, production environment, personnel, and manufacturing procedures change.” Manufacturers should use ongoing programs to collect and analyze product and process data to evaluate the state of control of the process. These programs may identify process or product problems or opportunities for process improvements that can be evaluated and implemented through some of the activities described in Stages 1 and 2.”

This course focuses on how to establish a systematic approach to implementing statistical methodologies into a process validation program consistent with the FDA guidance. It begins with a primer on statistics, focusing on methods that will be applied in each remaining chapter. Next, it teaches the application of statistics for setting specifications and assessing measurement systems (assays), two foundational requirements for process validation. Lastly, the course applies statistic through the three stages of process validation defined by requirements in the process validation regulatory guidance documents. Methods taught through all three stages are recommended by regulatory guidance documents; references to the specific citations in the guidance documents are provided.

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