Women’s Forum panel addresses women’s health, education challenges

nsWGLFNotecard-CourtesyWGLF

 

Health and education challenges that women face were the center of a panel discussion which took place Monday morning as part of the Women’s Global Leadership Forum.

Courtesy Women’s Global Leadership Forum

 

A panel addressing health and education challenges facing women took place Monday morning as part of the Women’s Global Leadership Forum. The discussion was facilitated by Rebecca Dillingham, director of the University’s Center for Global Health, and was comprised of of women who gave their global perspectives on the issues.

Newcomb Ballroom was packed with an audience that included high schoolers, University students, alumni and faculty members.

Vivian Pinn, the first full-time director of the Office of Research on Women’s Health at the National Institutes of Health, spoke briefly about being the first African-American female graduate from the University Medical School.

“I went into that first morning class in the fall of 1963 thinking that when I looked around the room and saw only white men — that the other women and people of color must just be late getting there,” Pinn said. “Then I realized that I was it. It was me and my classmates.”

Pinn said one of her main priorities she has pursued throughout her life is trying to ensure the medical world listens to women and discusses women’s health.

“I have focused on things that have been important to me my whole life,” Pinn said. “That is — What about the health of girls and women? What about girls getting careers in medicine? I couldn’t think of a better time to focus my energy on women’s health.”

The panel centralized their conversation on the importance of enabling education at a young level to facilitate greater gender equality amongst leadership roles.

Maya Ajmera, president and CEO of the Society for Science and the Public, spoke about her trip to India in which she saw train platform schools. The trip inspired her Global Fund for Children which works on behalf of vulnerable children. Ajmera said in the future she wants to focus on empowering local, grassroots organizations to enact change.

“Grassroot entrepreneurs …  They are the ones that resources really need to get put into because I think they’ve been starved,” Ajmera said. “I think they’ve been starved in this country, but I also see that starvation globally. So if we’re going to reach people, it’s through the grassroots.”

Ajmera also said one of her main priorities is to ensure that girls continue their education beyond primary school.

“We have to get the education of girls at the secondary level globally up,” Ajmera said. “The development goals of the U.N. have achieved great success in getting primary school admissions very high. But secondary school really has to be an emphasis.”

Abinet Sitotaw, a gender and nutrition advisor for nonprofit organization CARE-Ethiopia also said education was important in promoting women and girl’s empowerment. Speaking of her own personal mission and the Mandela Washington Fellowship, Sitotaw said her priorities involved getting girls into safe educational institutions.

“It’s going to be a leadership academy whereby I manage to bring a group of young girls who cannot attend secondary schools to the city,” Sitotaw said. “I want to give them a boarding school whereby they can get a state of the art education and also leadership skills.”

 

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Study finds link between increased brain glucose levels and Alzheimer’s

A new study published yesterday in Alzheimer’s & Dementia: the Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association, found a link for the first time between abnormalities in the mechanism of glucose breakdown in the brain and the severity of tangles and amyloid plaques in the brain, as well as the commencement of visible symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease.

Credit: Juan Gaertner / Shutterstock.com

This National Institute on Aging-supported study analyzed the brain tissue samples at autopsy from participants involved in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA). BLSA, which is one of the world’s longest-running scientific studies on human aging, records neurological, psychological as well as physical data of participants over many decades.

In the study, glucose levels in various areas of the brain, such as the temporal and frontal cortex that are prone to Alzheimer’s disease pathology as well as some resistant areas like the cerebellum, were evaluated.

The researchers investigated three different categories of BLSA participants during the study — (a) participants with Alzheimer’s symptoms throughout life and with confirmed pathology of Alzheimer’s disease, including neurofibrillary tangles and beta-amyloid protein plaques in the brain at the time of death; (b) those who lacked symptoms throughout life, yet had notable levels of Alzheimer’s pathology identified during the brain post-mortem; and (c) healthy controls.

The findings indicated discrete abnormalities in glycolysis, which is the major process involved in the breaking down of glucose in the brain, and provided evidence associating the severity of the abnormalities with the severity of the disease pathology.

Poorer glycolysis rates and increased levels of brain glucose were linked with more severe tangles and plaques in the brains of people affected with Alzheimer’s. Also, the more serious declines in brain glycolysis were associated with the manifestation of disease symptoms like memory issues during life.

Richard J. Hodes, M.D, the NIA Director, commented that this kind of research initiates novel ideas on how to investigate the connections between glycolysis, symptoms, and the disease pathology in escalating the search for better and more effective treatment and prevention methods for Alzheimer’s disease.

Even though the likenesses between Alzheimer’s and diabetes had been suspected for a long time, an evaluation of the link has remained difficult, as insulin is not required for the entry of glucose to the brain or to the neurons.

Glucose used by the brain was tracked by calculating ratios of the amino acids serine, alanine and glycine to glucose, which allowed the assessment of rates of the vital steps involved in glycolysis.

The researchers identified that in comparison with samples of normal brain tissue, the enzyme activities that controlled those vital glycolysis steps were lesser in Alzheimer’s cases.

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Navigating the nuances of the Internet of Medical Things

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Earlier this year, Gartner released a forecast for the Internet of Things (IoT)predicting that 8.4 billion connected things will be in use worldwide in 2017 and that total spending on endpoints and services will reach almost $2 trillion this year. This forecast is certainly encouraging, but due to the prevalence and influence of the Internet of Things in almost all business arenas, it’s not wholly surprising. What is quite eye-opening is the massive growth potential of certain emerging sub-sectors of the IoT – with one of those being the Internet of Medical Things (IoMT).

The IoMT market, which stood at $22.5 billion in 2016, is expected to grow at an impressive compound annual growth rate of 26.2 percent to reach $72 billion by 2021, according to analyst and research firm Frost & Sullivan. For some perspective on that $72 billion projection, that’s roughly the same size as forecasts for the virtual reality market – which is generating a lot more buzz than the IoMT. And in addition to healthcare industry stalwarts such as Medtronic and Philips, tech giants like Apple, IBM and Cisco are currently developing applications for the IoMT. So, considering all of this economic promise for the IoMT, it’s worth taking a deeper look at the sector and the opportunities and challenges it presents.

 

Read More: http://snip.ly/qk357#https://medcitynews.com/2017/09/navigating-nuances-internet-medical-things/?rf=1

An integrated approach is needed for Complaints Handling, Adverse Event Reporting, and Recalls

Medical Device manufacturers operate in numerous regulatory systems that often have different requirements and are not always consistent. The new ISO 13485:2016 emphasizes this problem

Adverse Event Reporting, and Recalls4

The fact that medical device manufacturers work and operate in various regulatory systems whose requirements are different and not always consistent with each other is recognized and empathized by the new ISO version, the ISO 13485:2016. Because of the divergence in the requirements of each regulatory system; manufacturers are required to identify their roles, as well as the regulatory requirements for that role, and then incorporate them into their Quality Management System.

When it comes to post-market device issues; the various jurisdictions, however, deal with these in different ways. Three interlocking, interrelated processes need to go into the QMS:

  • Complaint management
  • Adverse event reporting
  • Recalls

Supporting QMS processes such as corrective action and design changes also need to complement these three processes. Over and above the QMS processes come the regulatory requirements, which usually involve areas such as recordkeeping and reporting.

A complete learning on how to implement an integrated QMS

Adverse Event Reporting, and Recalls3

A highly educative and valuable learning session on these primary and secondary QMS processes and the way they need to be understood and implemented vis-à-vis the US, EU, and Canadian regulations is being organized by GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance.

The Director of this two-day seminar is Dan O’Leary, who is President of Ombu Enterprises, LLC, a company offering training and execution in Operational Excellence, which focuses on analytic skills and a systems approach to operations management. Dan brings more than 30 years’ experience in quality, operations, and program management in regulated industries including aviation, defense, medical devices, and clinical labs.

To understand the way in which to implement an integrated QMS in which the various aspects of complaints, adverse reporting and recalls are built; please register for this seminar by visiting An integrated approach is needed for Complaints Handling, Adverse Event Reporting, and Recalls This seminar has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

Alignment with the FDA’s QMS is a major point

Complaints, Adverse Event Reporting, and Recalls - An Integrated Approach

One of the highlights of the final version of the ISO 13485:2016 standard, which has now become available, is the extent of its alignment with the FDA’s Quality Management System (QMS) requirement. Although the degree of alignment set out in 2016 version of 13485 is significantly higher than that of the previous version of 2003; there still do exist a few points at which it deviates from the FDA’s QMS. Companies that are required to comply with this standard have to keep this in mind.

Now that the ISO 13485:2016, the Medical Device Single Audit Program (MDSAP), and the new EU Medical Device Regulation have been introduced; companies need to update their QMS and integrate all of the elements if their implementation has to be effective and compliant. At this two-day session, Dan will provide the tools that the participants will need for this.

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The agenda of this learning session will be the following:

  • The Regulatory Structure
  • FDA QSR
  • ISO 13485:2016 and regional variants
  • ISO 14971:2007 and regional variants
  • Implementing MDSAP
  • The EU Medical Device Regulation
  • Servicing
  • Identification of problems
  • Servicing data analysis
  • Input to the complaint process
  • Complaints

Identifying complaints

  • Evaluating complaints
  • Investigating complaints
  • Complaint data analysis
  • Input to the corrective action process
  • Input to the risk management process
  • Corrective Action
  • Developing the process
  • Analyzing product and process information
  • Determining subsequent actions
  • Input to the design process
  • Input to the risk management process
  • Design and Design Changes
  • Determining the need for a design change
  • Documenting design changes
  • Design change verification and validation
  • Input to the risk management process
  • Input to the pre-market submission process
  • Risk Management
  • ISO 14971:2007 and regional variants
  • Incorporating post-market information
  • Updating Pre-market Submissions
  • US – The 510(k) guidance
  • EU – Technical files and design dossiers
  • Canada – License changes
  • Adverse Event Reporting
  • US – MDR
  • EU – Vigilance Reports
  • Canada – Mandatory Problem Reporting
  • Recalls
  • US – Corrections and Removals
  • EU – Field Safety Corrective Actions
  • Canada – Recall.