Combined ISO 14001 Ohsas 18001 Implementation

Combined ISO 14001 Ohsas 18001 Implementation

ISO 14001 and Ohsas 18001 are two distinct, yet similar standards that organizations need to implement. There are several similarities between the two; yet, in terms of structure, they are essentially the same, which is why there is combined ISO 14001 and Ohsas 18001 implementation.

Structurally different

While going into the similarities between the two systems, which outnumber the dissimilarities, let us begin with their definitions. ISO 14001 is an Environmental Management System (EMS) which offers organizations a framework for quantifying and enhancing their environmental impact, making combined ISO 14001 and Ohsas 18001 implementation corollary to each other.

Internal and external differences

On the other hand, Ohsas is a standard of the Occupational Health and Safety Management System (Ohsas), and it differs from 14001 in its core meaning, as we have seen. Ohsas 18000 series is concerned with the impact working conditions have on employees, just as 14000 is concerned with the environmental impact of the organization’s work. In other words, while 14000 series is concerned with the impact of the external environment; Ohsas 18000 is more about how the internal environment impacts the organization, and during combined ISO 14001 and Ohsas 18001 implementation; these have to be factored in.

Combined implementation

This apart, the two have the same elements that go into implementation. These are the following common elements between the two that go together when an organization implements these two systems, keeping which in mind makes combined ISO 14001 and Ohsas 18001 implementation easy:

  • Auditing
  • Calibration
  • Corrective and Preventive Action
  • Document Control
  • Management Review
  • Operational Control
  • Policy
  • Records
  • Roles & Responsibilities
  • Supplier Control/Purchasing
  • Targets & Objectives
  • Training

Reference:

http://integrated-standards.com/compare-iso-14001-ohsas-18001.aspx

 

Contact Detail

webinars@globalcompliancepanel.com
http://www.globalcompliancepanel.com

Phone: 800-447-9407
Fax: 302-288-6884

1000 N West Street | Suite 1200 | Wilmington | DE | USA | 19801

 

Combined ISO 14001 Ohsas 18001 Implementation –flow

Combined ISO 14001 Ohsas 18001 Implementation –flow

ISO 14001 and Ohsas 18001 are two different, yet parallel standards that organizations can implement. ISO 14001 is an Environmental Management System (EMS) which offers organizations a framework for measuring and improving their environmental impact, while Ohsas is a standard of the Occupational Health and Safety Management System (Ohsas). It is different in that it deals with the internal working environment of the organization. That is why it makes sense to have a flow during combined ISO 14001 and Ohsas 18001 implementation.

Flow for combined ISO 14001 and Ohsas 18001 implementation

When a proper flow is maintained, combined ISO 14001 and Ohsas 18001 implementation becomes logically analogous to each other. A good flow for combined ISO 14001 and Ohsas 18001 implementation could be this:

OHSAS 18001 ISO 14001
4.1 General Requirements 4.1 General Requirements
4.2 OH&S Policy 4.2 Environmental Policy
4.3 Planning 4.3 Planning
4.3.1 Hazard Identification, Risk Assessment, & Determining Controls 4.3.1 Environmental Aspects
4.3.2 Legal and Other Requirements 4.3.2 Legal and Other Requirements
4.3.3 Objectives and Programs 4.3.3 Objectives, Targets and Program(s)
4.4 Implementation and Operation 4.4 Implementation and Operation
4.4.1 Resources, Roles, Responsibility, Accountability and Authority 4.4.1 Resources, Roles, Responsibility and Authority
4.4.2 Competence, Training and Awareness 4.4.2 Competence, Training and Awareness
4.4.3 Communication, Participation, and Consultation NA
4.4.3.1 Communication 4.4.3 Communication
4.4.3.2 Participation and Consultation NA
4.4.4 Documentation 4.4.4 Documentation
4.4.5 Control of Documents 4.4.5 Control of Documents
4.4.6 Operational Control 4.4.6 Operational Control
4.4.7 Emergency Preparedness and Response 4.4.7 Emergency Preparedness and Response
4.5 Checking 4.5 Checking
4.5.1 Performance Measurement and Monitoring 4.5.1 Monitoring and Measurement
4.5.2 Evaluation of Compliance 4.5.2 Evaluation of Compliance
4.5.3 Incident Investigation, Nonconformity, Corrective Action and Preventive Action NA
4.5.3.1 Incident Investigation NA
4.5.3.2 Nonconformity, Corrective and Preventive Action 4.5.3 Nonconformity, Corrective and Preventive Action
4.5.4 Control of Records 4.5.4 Control of Records
4.5.5 Internal Audit 4.5.5 Internal Audit
4.6 Management Review 4.6 Management Review

 

When organizations opt for combined ISO 14001 and Ohsas 18001 implementation, they could keep the above in mind for putting efficient and effective systems in place.

Reference:

http://integrated-standards.com/compare-iso-14001-ohsas-18001.aspx

 

Contact Detail

webinars@globalcompliancepanel.com
http://www.globalcompliancepanel.com

Phone: 800-447-9407
Fax: 302-288-6884

1000 N West Street | Suite 1200 | Wilmington | DE | USA | 19801

OHSAS 18001 Gap Analysis Audit

OHSAS 18001 Gap Analysis Audit

OSHA stands for Occupational Safety and Health Administration. OSHA 18001 is the international standard that ensures safety and health at the workplace. It is the organization that has to show compliance with the provisions set out in this standard by ensuring that it is implementing OSHA 18001 at its workplace.

The aim of carrying out OSHA 18001 is to ensure that there is good management of work-related safety and ergonomics at the workplace. It seeks to reduce accidents and work-related health issues.

What is the role of gap analysis?

Gap analysis is all about determining if the organization’s safety management systems sit in sync with the requirements set out in OSHA 18001. Like all other gap analyses; OSHA 18001 gap analysis audit too, should be done before an organization puts its safety system in place. This is because of the obvious reason that it makes sense to carry this out at an earlier stage than later.

The aim of the gap analysis is to prevent future gaps and maladjustments into the organization’s safety systems. Carrying out this audit is also helpful in identifying areas of safety that matter most to employees, gauge the resources needed for carrying this out, and acting on these.

Documentation is at the heart

When an OSHA auditor visits your place, make sure that your documents on safety are in place. Make sure you have all the details they will ask for, such as the number of employees in the workplace; safety measures in place till now; the number, if any, of employees with physical challenges, and what has been done to address them, and the like.

References:

http://www.aviva.co.uk/risksolutions/consultancy/health-and-safety/bs-ohsas-18001-gap-analysis.html

http://rynmag.co.za/index.php/understanding-ohsas-18001-gap-analysis-audit/

 

Contact Detail

webinars@globalcompliancepanel.com
http://www.globalcompliancepanel.com

Phone: 800-447-9407
Fax: 302-288-6884

1000 N West Street | Suite 1200 | Wilmington | DE | USA | 19801