Psychiatric care is postcode lottery, say medical experts

Psychiatric care is postcode lottery, say medical experts

There are not enough NHS psychiatrists in some parts of the UK and more should be recruited to improve care, says the Royal College of Psychiatrists.

In Scotland, there are 10 consultant psychiatrists per 100,000 people – but only eight for the same number in England and Northern Ireland, and just six in Wales.

London’s tally is more than double that of the east of England.

English health ministers said thousands of new posts were already planned.

The government in England recently announced there would be 570 extra consultant psychiatrists by 2020-21.

And the Welsh government said it was committed to improving mental health services in Wales.

But the Royal College of Psychiatrists said there were too few medical students specialising in psychiatry and not enough psychiatrists becoming consultants.

In England, in the past five years, it said there had been a 1.7% increase in psychiatry consultants compared with a 20.2% increase in other consultants across the NHS.

Areas such as London and the north-east of England have more than 11 psychiatrists per 100,000 people but the south-west has six and Yorkshire five.

‘Falling short’

Prof Wendy Burn, President of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, said: “People with a severe mental illness should expect to see a specialist consultant, just as you would for a severe physical illness.

“The huge variation in consultant psychiatrists across the country means reality is increasingly falling short of our expectations.

“As highly skilled medics, psychiatrists must be able to spot the nuance in symptoms, ask the right questions, and understand what the problem is.

 

Read More: http://snip.ly/u70ov#http://www.bbc.com/news/health-41201396

Statistics for Medical Professionals

Medical statistics, also called biostatistics, is an important area for medical professionals. Statistics and the medical professionals may not seem very easily associable with each other at first glance, but a deeper look suggests the connection between statistics and the medical profession.

Statistics is a set of data and tables. These figures are meant to offer understanding and perspectives on a number of issues. When it comes to the medical profession; statistics for medical professionals becomes very important to those in the field of public health. Every time a government or an international agency of a world body such as the UN undertakes a program on public health; statistics are of immense importance for medical professionals.

Many uses of statistics for medical professionalsStatistics for medical professionals is useful in helping them analyze public health issues. Detailed figures of the incidence of malaria for instance, are a very useful piece of statistics for medical professionals. This kind of statistics helps them determine the causes of the disease and helps them decide on the plan of action.

Statistics for medical professionals is also useful at the local level. A medical professional working in a town or village could benefit immensely when she has statistics meant for medical professionals. It helps the professional understand what local causes are giving rise to health issues. Statistics for medical professionals thus helps them tackle issues at the local as well as the global levels

A specialized fieldIn developed countries, statistics for medical professionals has become a full-fledged profession. It is finessed at graduate and postgraduate programs at which they study the essentials of statistics for medical professionals. They then carry out programs that are suited for their profession.

Statistics for medical professionals is used in a wide variety of disciplines. Usually, courses on statistics for medical professionals cover the following areas:

  • Data Analysis of statistics for medical professionals
  • Dealing with Missing Data
  • Higher Issues in Trials
  • Linear Regression and Correlation
  • Logistic Regression
  • Correlated Data analysis
  • Continuous Data comparison between groups
  • Survival Data analysis
  • Risk, Rates and Odds of statistics for medical professionals
  • Randomized Trials
  • Observational Studies of statistics for medical professionals
  • Categorical Data comparison between groups
  • Calculations of Sample Size
  • Testing of Estimation and Hypothesis

More information go through this link: https://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/seminar?Linkedin_SEO

FDA guidance on process validation

FDA guidance on process validation

The FDA guidance on process validation is an important document that offers guidelines on Process Validation (PV), a critical aspect of medical device and pharmaceutical manufacturing.

In November ’08, the FDA issued a draft guideline that revised the old guidelines on PV. The FDA guidance on process validation was now the standard that replaced the FDA guidance on process validation that was in force from 1987.  FDA guidance on process validation underwent another revision in January 2011, which is now the current standard. It has altered the spirit of the earlier documents in a few ways.

January 2011 changes

  • It now gives greater emphasis to use ICH Q 8, 9 and 10;
  • The term ‘commercial manufacturing’ has come to replace the old word, ‘commercial production’. This means a significant change in the scope of the ICH.
  • The January 2011 FDA guidance on process validation has also given a slightly different definition of PV and Stage 1 and Stage 2.
  • The new FDA guidance on process validationdescribes PV as “The collection and evaluation of data, from the process design stage through commercial production, which establishes scientific evidence that a process is capable of consistently delivering quality product.”

Why did the FDA change guidelines on PV?

The FDA guidance on process validation underwent changes because it was observed during its investigations that drugs of inferior quality were being marketed even though they were manufactured under less demanding processes, which were being passed off as “validated”.

Manufacturers need to ask these:

In essence, FDA guidance on process validation requires manufacturers to ask themselves these questions:

  • Which scientific evidence I have used gives me the confidence that my process is capable of consistently and repeatedly delivering quality product?
  • Can I show that my process works as intended?
  • What are the ways by which I can know that my process has remained in control?

References:

http://www.gmp-compliance.org/eca_news_2380_6764,6864,6917,6971.html

http://www.gmp-compliance.org/eca_news_2600.html

 

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