ISO 14001, the world’s most Popular Standard for Environmental Management

If one were to be asked at a quiz which the most popular standard for environmental management is; the answer shouldn’t be difficult to give: it is the ISO 14001 by a long shot. In fact, since its enactment in 1996, ISO 14001 has been so popular that many think it is the only existing global standard on the subject of environmental management. What makes the ISO 14001 so popular?

The roots of this Standard can be traced to the emergence of the environment at the forefront of world forums and debates since about the early 1990’s. The enactment of this Standard was the culmination of the growing awareness of the importance of the environment among governments, businesses and the general public. As a result of the sustained efforts of environmental groups and other interested stakeholders, enactment of standards about the environment became almost an imperative for governments across the world.

What is the ISO 14001, and what does it do?

As we have seen, the ISO 14001 is a Standard for environmental management. It chalks out a set of guidelines to organizations across the globe for managing the environment, through a combination of action items that include, but are not restricted to the following:

  1. Ways by which to cut waste
  2. Means by which energy use can be lowered
  3. Adapt the growth and use of renewable resources
  4. Adapt a risk based approach to pollution prevention
  5. Impress upon organizations the need to comply with regulatory and legal requirements
  6. Make provisions for designs that are comprehensive and cover the complete product lifecycle

What kinds of organizations are required to comply with ISO 14001?

The ISO 14001 description clearly states that a broad swathe of organizations, both in the services and manufacturing sector need to comply with relevant provisions of the ISO 14001. Industrial and service organizations, public bodies and utilities in more than 150 countries around the world have accepted ISO 14001 as the Standard for environmental management.

References:

http://www.nsai.ie/our-services/certification/management-systems/iso-14001-environmental-management.aspx

Combined ISO 14001 Ohsas 18001 Implementation

Combined ISO 14001 Ohsas 18001 Implementation

ISO 14001 and Ohsas 18001 are two distinct, yet similar standards that organizations need to implement. There are several similarities between the two; yet, in terms of structure, they are essentially the same, which is why there is combined ISO 14001 and Ohsas 18001 implementation.

Structurally different

While going into the similarities between the two systems, which outnumber the dissimilarities, let us begin with their definitions. ISO 14001 is an Environmental Management System (EMS) which offers organizations a framework for quantifying and enhancing their environmental impact, making combined ISO 14001 and Ohsas 18001 implementation corollary to each other.

Internal and external differences

On the other hand, Ohsas is a standard of the Occupational Health and Safety Management System (Ohsas), and it differs from 14001 in its core meaning, as we have seen. Ohsas 18000 series is concerned with the impact working conditions have on employees, just as 14000 is concerned with the environmental impact of the organization’s work. In other words, while 14000 series is concerned with the impact of the external environment; Ohsas 18000 is more about how the internal environment impacts the organization, and during combined ISO 14001 and Ohsas 18001 implementation; these have to be factored in.

Combined implementation

This apart, the two have the same elements that go into implementation. These are the following common elements between the two that go together when an organization implements these two systems, keeping which in mind makes combined ISO 14001 and Ohsas 18001 implementation easy:

  • Auditing
  • Calibration
  • Corrective and Preventive Action
  • Document Control
  • Management Review
  • Operational Control
  • Policy
  • Records
  • Roles & Responsibilities
  • Supplier Control/Purchasing
  • Targets & Objectives
  • Training

Reference:

http://integrated-standards.com/compare-iso-14001-ohsas-18001.aspx

 

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Combined ISO 14001 Ohsas 18001 Implementation –flow

Combined ISO 14001 Ohsas 18001 Implementation –flow

ISO 14001 and Ohsas 18001 are two different, yet parallel standards that organizations can implement. ISO 14001 is an Environmental Management System (EMS) which offers organizations a framework for measuring and improving their environmental impact, while Ohsas is a standard of the Occupational Health and Safety Management System (Ohsas). It is different in that it deals with the internal working environment of the organization. That is why it makes sense to have a flow during combined ISO 14001 and Ohsas 18001 implementation.

Flow for combined ISO 14001 and Ohsas 18001 implementation

When a proper flow is maintained, combined ISO 14001 and Ohsas 18001 implementation becomes logically analogous to each other. A good flow for combined ISO 14001 and Ohsas 18001 implementation could be this:

OHSAS 18001 ISO 14001
4.1 General Requirements 4.1 General Requirements
4.2 OH&S Policy 4.2 Environmental Policy
4.3 Planning 4.3 Planning
4.3.1 Hazard Identification, Risk Assessment, & Determining Controls 4.3.1 Environmental Aspects
4.3.2 Legal and Other Requirements 4.3.2 Legal and Other Requirements
4.3.3 Objectives and Programs 4.3.3 Objectives, Targets and Program(s)
4.4 Implementation and Operation 4.4 Implementation and Operation
4.4.1 Resources, Roles, Responsibility, Accountability and Authority 4.4.1 Resources, Roles, Responsibility and Authority
4.4.2 Competence, Training and Awareness 4.4.2 Competence, Training and Awareness
4.4.3 Communication, Participation, and Consultation NA
4.4.3.1 Communication 4.4.3 Communication
4.4.3.2 Participation and Consultation NA
4.4.4 Documentation 4.4.4 Documentation
4.4.5 Control of Documents 4.4.5 Control of Documents
4.4.6 Operational Control 4.4.6 Operational Control
4.4.7 Emergency Preparedness and Response 4.4.7 Emergency Preparedness and Response
4.5 Checking 4.5 Checking
4.5.1 Performance Measurement and Monitoring 4.5.1 Monitoring and Measurement
4.5.2 Evaluation of Compliance 4.5.2 Evaluation of Compliance
4.5.3 Incident Investigation, Nonconformity, Corrective Action and Preventive Action NA
4.5.3.1 Incident Investigation NA
4.5.3.2 Nonconformity, Corrective and Preventive Action 4.5.3 Nonconformity, Corrective and Preventive Action
4.5.4 Control of Records 4.5.4 Control of Records
4.5.5 Internal Audit 4.5.5 Internal Audit
4.6 Management Review 4.6 Management Review

 

When organizations opt for combined ISO 14001 and Ohsas 18001 implementation, they could keep the above in mind for putting efficient and effective systems in place.

Reference:

http://integrated-standards.com/compare-iso-14001-ohsas-18001.aspx

 

Contact Detail

webinars@globalcompliancepanel.com
http://www.globalcompliancepanel.com

Phone: 800-447-9407
Fax: 302-288-6884

1000 N West Street | Suite 1200 | Wilmington | DE | USA | 19801

ISO 14001 –the management’s responsibilities

ISO 14001 –the management’s responsibilities

ISO 14001 deals with an organization’s environmental policy.  This instrument has been designed to ensure that organizations achieve and demonstrate sound environmental performance. An organization has to assess the impact of its business on the environment and shape its environmental policy accordingly, so that it contributes to sustainable development.

Management’s role

The management in an organization is the prime player in implementing environmental actions laid out by ISO 14001. Many of them undertake their own environmental performance and audits, but they have to be consistent with what is required of this standard. This ISO standard requires that organizations implement an Environmental Management System (EMS). It requires the organization’s top management to define and enforce the organization’s EMS. The most important points of this policy are that the organization should have an EMS that reflects the nature of its products and is appropriate and proportionate to them and that there is transparency in the policy, meaning that it is made public.

Implementation and operation

In implementing its EMS; the organization should designate a person who will oversee the policy. The environmental policy should be implemented on the organization’s infrastructure, such as buildings, its facilities, drainage tanks and so on.

The organization will appoint a competent, knowledgeable person who has the skill, knowledge and experience to carry out this policy. They could also be trained for the purpose of carrying out the organization’s EMS.

Transparency and introspection

It is very important for the organization to ensure transparency in its policy by internally communicating the goals and objectives of the policy to all employees. It should document every action it takes on the EMS by constantly evaluating the impact of its actions in relation to the environment. It should analyze this in relation to the impact of what its non-actions will have on the environment. It should also make adequate responses to onsite emergencies such as proper storage of inflammable materials.

Reference:

http://www.cait.cn/ISO14000/biaozhun/bzwj/200808/P020081104476975314192.pdf

 

Contact Detail

webinars@globalcompliancepanel.com
http://www.globalcompliancepanel.com

Phone: 800-447-9407
Fax: 302-288-6884

1000 N West Street | Suite 1200 | Wilmington | DE | USA | 19801