Forbes Talks Taxes, Healthcare in Address to Students

Forbes Talks Taxes, Healthcare in Address to Students

As Republicans struggle to score a legislative win on taxes, Steve Forbes dismissed fears that the American economy is doomed to slow economic growth or secular stagnation as “preposterous.”

Forbes, the chairman and editor-in-chief of Forbes Media and former Republican presidential candidate, blamed the current economic rut on correctable policy errors in a lecture sponsored by the Cornell Republicans on Wednesday.

The real source of wealth in society derives not from physical things, Forbes said, but from the human mind, as the modern economy cannot prosper without “human ingenuity.” Free markets will always turn scarcity into abundance, he said, using automobile innovation as an example.

“One hundred twenty years ago, a car costed over 110,000 dollars,” he said. “It was a toy for the rich. But Henry Ford came along with the moving assembly line and turned this toy for the rich into something every working person can afford.”

Rejecting the argument that automation will deprive Americans of jobs, Forbes said that free markets will allow people to apply ingenuity and advance a society built on knowledge and innovation.

The fear of robots, he said, is misguided, since society has been utilizing robots throughout history. He urged students to think about how the invention of the tractor — which was viewed as a robot when it was first introduced — freed up millions of acres for farmland and hours of labor.

Forbes also said that Republicans are unable to pass a tax cut because they are putting “process before progress,” and relying too heavily on the Congressional Budget Office to predict the future to change various laws and tax codes.

“The blunt truth is, if the Congressional Budget Office knew what would happen, they would be buying lottery tickets or speculating commodities,” he said.

Forbes proposed that Republicans follow the actions of Ronald Reagan and pursue a straight tax cut, which he said would reduce the business tax rate to 15 percent.

Republicans led on cuts to healthcare rather than taxes primarily because the CBO calculated that the government would save $1.1 trillion over the next 10 years following healthcare cuts, which would ultimately allow for additional tax cuts, Forbes said. However, the plan to cut healthcare and then follow up with cuts to larger company’s tax bills is an unfortunate message to the American people, he said.

Forbes also criticized the federal income tax code, calling it a “monstrosity” that not even experts in the Internal Revenue Service truly understand.

“Take this monster,” he said, referring to the federal income tax code. “I would say bury it, but I don’t know if the EPA would let us bury something so toxic.”

The problem with the American healthcare system stems from the lack of real free markets, Forbes said. There is a disconnect between providers and consumers, since the system is controlled by insurance companies, rather than by the patient. Hospitals’ revenues depend on negotiations with insurers and the government, but not with satisfying patients, he said.

“The crummiest motel in America wouldn’t dare put you in a room with another guest with a curtain in between,” he said. “But they do it routinely in hospitals.”

Nationwide “shopping” for health insurance, equal tax treatment and increased transparency between hospitals and patients are all factors key to improving the healthcare system, Forbes said.

Hospitals should also be mandated to publicly post how many patients die from infections they have received after admission to the hospital, he said.

“Ninety thousand patients die from infections after being admitted to hospitals,” he said. “Experts say 80 percent of these deaths could be prevented.”

 

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Breast cancer warning from man stunned by ‘impossible’ diagnosis

Breast cancer warning from man stunned by 'impossible' diagnosis.jpg

When you think of breast cancer, you think of a form of cancer that affects only women. It doesn’t.

While breast cancer in men is rare it’s still an issue for the 10 men on average who are diagnosed with it every year in Northern Ireland.

Ian Cranston, 70, was diagnosed with breast cancer in May. Two weeks later he had a mastectomy.

The Portadown father-of-two was given the all-clear in June and has decided to speak publicly to make men aware that it’s a cancer that doesn’t just affect women.

He said “men also need to check their breasts for changes”.

Inverted nipple

In May, Ian’s wife Elizabeth noticed something wrong when he got out of the shower.

Image copyright SPL
Image caption About 10 men in Northern Ireland are diagnosed with breast cancer each year

She told him he had an inverted nipple and needed to see his GP.

“I didn’t know what that meant,” said Ian.

“Men can’t get breast cancer, I don’t have to go to the doctor.

“I wasn’t aware I had breasts. This is my chest, men don’t have breasts, it’s impossible,” he added.

Eventually his wife persuaded him to go to his GP, who referred him to Craigavon Area Hospital.

Image caption Ian Cranston alongside breast care specialist nurse Annie Treanor

The diagnosis stunned him.

“Men having breast cancer, I couldn’t believe it,” he said.

“I couldn’t do or say anything. My wife Elizabeth cried.”

Four days later Ian said he “just broke”.

He has decided to help try and raise awareness of the disease, saying that if his speaking out helped one man, it would be worth it.

“I can understand where women are coming from because I’ve had breast cancer myself,” he said.

How We Need to Keep Growing Up: http://snip.ly/ljoxy#http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-northern-ireland-41616265

Graham-Cassidy health care bill: What you need to know

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Sens. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina and Bill Cassidy of Louisiana have drafted the latest Republican attempt to repeal Obamacare. The bill would overhaul or eliminate major sections of the health care law, including its subsidized insurance coverage and Medicaid expansion. Instead, states would receive block grants, or a lump sum of money from the federal government, which they could use largely as they see fit.

How Graham-Cassidy would alter federal funding

Center on Budget and Policy Priorities analysis

The liberal-leaning think tank Center on Budget and Policy Priorities released estimates of how federal funding would change if the bill became law. In its analysis, California would be hardest hit, losing $27.8-billion in funding.

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Graham-Cassidy-Heller-Johnson block grant model

Cassidy’s office released its own estimates. Massachusetts takes the hardest hit with a more than $5 billion loss in funding. Overall, Southern states that did not expand Medicaid are poised to receive more in federal funding.

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The bill comes after three failed GOP repeal attempts in the Senate, and a proposal from Sen. Bernie Sanders to extend the reach of government subsidized health care to all Americans.

But Republicans are up against a tight deadline. Their budget reconciliation bill, which allows them to overhaul Obamacare with a simple majority, expires on Sept. 30. The deadline could work to Graham’s and Cassidy’s advantage, however, by spurring hesitant Republicans to seize what may be their last opportunity to deliver on their seven-year promise to repeal Obamacare.

 

Read More: http://snip.ly/v5ygq#http://www.politico.com/interactives/2017/graham-cassidy-health-care-bill-what-you-need-to-know/

Hurricane Harvey HIPAA Reminder

Disasters, which can ultimately lead to a data breach, come in various forms – natural, man-made and technical. HIPAA, the HITECH Act, the Federal Trade Commission and the Securities and Exchange Commission are just a handful of entities requiring that the confidentiality, integrity and availability of the sensitive information (e.g., protected health information (PHI) and personally identifiable information (PII)) remain intact. Although federal HIPAA has distinct categories (e.g., covered entity, business associate, and subcontractor), other state or federal government entities use “covered entity” to mean any person that creates, receives, maintains or transmits PHI or PII.

HIPAA sets forth three main categories of safeguards: administrative, physical, and technical safeguards. Often times, these categories overlap. For example, the administrative requirement of a sanction policy compliments the physical requirement of two-factor identification for building access.

Below are a couple of select sections from the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), which organizations should be particularly vigilant about in relation to disasters.

•45 CFR §164.310 (Physical) – requires that policies and procedures for facility access in order to restore lost data under the disaster recovery and emergency access plan.

•45 CFR §164.308 (Administrative Safeguards) – multiple requirements are set forth under this particular section of the CFR. For example:

•Security management process

•Annual risk analysis

•Information activity review

•Workforce clearance procedure

•Security awareness training

•Contingency plan

 

Read More: http://snip.ly/duepz#http://www.diagnosticimaging.com/blog/hurricane-harvey-hipaa-reminder

OSHA Proposes Extending Compliance Deadline for Crane Operator Certification Requirements to 2018

OSHA Proposes Extending

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) today issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to extend the employer’s responsibility to ensure crane operator competency and enforcement for crane operator certification to Nov. 10, 2018.

OSHA issued a final rule in September 2014, extending the deadline by three years for crane operator certification requirements in the Cranes and Derricks in Construction standard. The final rule also extended by three years the employer’s responsibility to ensure that crane operators are competent to operate a crane safely.

The agency is now proposing an extension of the enforcement date to address stakeholder concerns over the operator certification requirements in the Cranes and Derricks in Construction standard.

 

Read More: http://snip.ly/l4l6i#http://www.forconstructionpros.com/rental/lifting-equipment/crane/press-release/20974421/occupational-safety-health-administration-osha-proposes-extending-compliance-deadline-for-crane-operator-certification-requirements-to-2018

Beyond the HIPAA Privacy Rule: Enhancing Privacy, Improving Health Through Research.

The Value and Importance of Health Information Privacy

Ethical health research and privacy protections both provide valuable benefits to society. Health research is vital to improving human health and health care. Protecting patients involved in research from harm and preserving their rights is essential to ethical research. The primary justification for protecting personal privacy is to protect the interests of individuals. In contrast, the primary justification for collecting personally identifiable health information for health research is to benefit society. But it is important to stress that privacy also has value at the societal level, because it permits complex activities, including research and public health activities to be carried out in ways that protect individuals’ dignity. At the same time, health research can benefit individuals, for example, when it facilitates access to new therapies, improved diagnostics, and more effective ways to prevent illness and deliver care.

The intent of this chapter1 is to define privacy and to delineate its importance to individuals and society as a whole. The value and importance of health research will be addressed in Chapter 3.

CONCEPTS AND VALUE OF PRIVACY

Definitions

Privacy has deep historical roots (reviewed by Pritts, 2008Westin, 1967), but because of its complexity, privacy has proven difficult to define and has been the subject of extensive, and often heated, debate by philosophers, sociologists, and legal scholars. The term “privacy” is used frequently, yet there is no universally accepted definition of the term, and confusion persists over the meaning, value, and scope of the concept of privacy. At its core, privacy is experienced on a personal level and often means different things to different people (reviewed by Lowrance, 1997Pritts, 2008). In modern society, the term is used to denote different, but overlapping, concepts such as the right to bodily integrity or to be free from intrusive searches or surveillance. The concept of privacy is also context specific, and acquires a different meaning depending on the stated reasons for the information being gathered, the intentions of the parties involved, as well as the politics, convention and cultural expectations (Nissenbaum, 2004NRC, 2007b).

Our report, and the Privacy Rule itself, are concerned with health informational privacy. In the context of personal information, concepts of privacy are closely intertwined with those of confidentiality and security. However, although privacy is often used interchangeably with the terms “confidentiality” and “security,” they have distinct meanings.Privacy addresses the question of who has access to personal information and under what conditions. Privacy is concerned with the collection, storage, and use of personal information, and examines whether data can be collected in the first place, as well as the justifications, if any, under which data collected for one purpose can be used for another (secondary)2 purpose. An important issue in privacy analysis is whether the individual has authorized particular uses of his or her personal information (Westin, 1967).

Confidentiality safeguards information that is gathered in the context of an intimate relationship. It addresses the issue of how to keep information exchanged in that relationship from being disclosed to third parties (Westin, 1976). Confidentiality, for example, prevents physicians from disclosing information shared with them by a patient in the course of a physician–patient relationship. Unauthorized or inadvertent disclosures of data gained as part of an intimate relationship are breaches of confidentiality (Gostin and Hodge, 2002NBAC, 2001).

 

Read More: http://snip.ly/tlhw0#https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK9579/

 

How does the US healthcare system compare with other countries?

Despite US legislation in 2010 that moved the country closer to achieving universal healthcare, costs have continued to rise and nearly 26 million Americans are still uninsured according to the Congressional Budget Office.

As Republicans decide whether to repeal or replace the struggling healthcare policy, how does the existing US healthcare system compare with those in other countries?

Broadly speaking, the World Health Organization (WHO) defines universal health coverage as a system where everyone has access to quality health services and is protected against financial risk incurred while accessing care.

A brief history of the healthcare systems used today

Among the 35 OECD member countries, 32 have now introduced universal healthcare legislation that resembles the WHO criteria.

In Germany, the world’s first national health insurance system shows how UHC often evolves from an initial law. Originally for industrial labourers, cover gradually expanded to cover all job sectors and social groups, with today’s German workers contributing around 15% of their monthly salary, half paid by employers, to public sickness funds.

Established in 1948 to be free at the point of use, the UK’s NHS has almost totemic status for Britain’s rising, ageing population who scrutinise it like perhaps no other policy area. While care from GP services to major surgery remains free as intended, the system is under unprecedented financial strain from a funding gap estimated to be in the billions.

Under France’s state-run equivalent of the UK’s NHS, the majority of patients must pay the doctor or practitioner upfront. The state then reimburses them in part or in full. Workers make compulsory payments into state funds used to reimburse between 70% and 100% of the upfront fees, while many people pay into other schemes to cover the balance.

In the mid-1960s, the United States implemented insurance programs called Medicare and Medicaid for segments of the population including low income and elderly adults. In 2010, Obamacare became the closest the US has come to a system of UHC. A legal mandate now requires all Americans to have insurance or pay a penalty. About 26 million people remain without health insurance despite these advances.

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Spending compared with life expectancy

Life expectancy in the US is still lower than other developed countries, despite health funding increasing at a much faster pace.

https://interactive.guim.co.uk/uploader/embed/2017/07/archive-4-zip/giv-3902KPB1eyzruSUd/

Who provides healthcare and how is it paid for?

How healthcare is funded has a direct effect on the level of healthcare people have access to.

Single-payer

The state funds an agreed range of services through public clinics that are paid for through taxes
For example, in Sweden there is a limit in how much you pay for healthcare in one year of between 900-1100 kronor (£80-£100)

Two-tier

Government healthcare may be less comprehensive and minimum level of coverage can be supplemented by private insurance
In Australia, hospital treatment is covered by Medicare, yet most people pay a fee to see a GP or for ambulance services. 57% of adults have private insurance

Insurance mandate

A two-tier system underpinned by an insurance mandate where citizens are legally required to purchase cover from public or private insurers
Most people in Japan receive health insurance from their employer, otherwise they must sign up for a national health insurance programme. Medical fees are regulated to keep them affordable

How could the US healthcare system change?

Donald Trump ran on a campaign to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, popularly known as Obamacare, but discord among Republicans has highlighted the political challenges faced with implementing a healthcare system, much less trying to change it.

With millions still uninsured and the financial burden of healthcare still quite high, the current US policy falls short of the WHO threshold.

Thus far, separate bills introduced in the House and the Senate were estimated to see steep increases in the number of uninsured from current levels.

Estimated uninsured under existing and proposed healthcare plans

https://interactive.guim.co.uk/uploader/embed/2017/07/us-health-bills/giv-390230uMJnHPMgxF/