Depression: Is brain inflammation tied to suicidal thoughts?

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A new study confirms the link between inflammation of the brain and the prevalence of suicidal thoughts in people diagnosed with major depression. This is the first study of its kind to measure relevant biomarkers in living individuals.

Major depression is a very common mental condition, with 6.7 percent of all adults in the United States having had at least one severe depressive episode in 2014 or 2015.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), depression is also currently the leading cause of years spent with disability worldwide.

Some people diagnosed with major depression experience suicidal thoughts, which may result in suicide attempts. In the U.S., “suicide is the 10th leading cause of death.” Now, researchers wonder whether or not suicidal ideation in people with major depression may be linked to abnormal inflammation of the brain.

Dr. Peter Talbot and other researchers based at the University of Manchester in the United Kingdom have conducted a study testing the levels of a biomarker associated with brain inflammation in the systems of people diagnosed with clinical depression.

The scientists’ findings were reported in the journal Biological Psychiatry.

 

Read More: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/319526.php?utm_campaign=sniply&utm_medium=sniply&utm_source=sniply

Mental health staff on long-term stress leave up 22%

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Image caption Some trusts saw the number of staff taking long-term leave double in five years

The number of NHS mental health staff who have had to take sick leave because of their own mental health issues has risen by 22% in the past five years.

Those taking long-term leave of a month or more rose from 7,580 in 2012-13 to 9,285 in 2016-17, BBC freedom of information requests found.

The union Unite said cuts to staff and services were putting extra pressure on front-line mental health workers.

The Department of Health said it was transforming mental health care.

Out of 81 mental health authorities in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, 58 provided the BBC with comparable information.

Looking after ourselves

One mental health doctor who had to take mental health leave told 5 live anonymously: “I don’t think I realised it was happening until quite a long way down the road.”

She explained that she was getting irritable with her partner, her sleep was disturbed and she couldn’t switch off from work.

“In the end, I went to my GP who offered me a sick note. I was quite taken aback that it was quite so obvious to my GP that I needed to be off work.” she said.

Media captionFormer mental health nurse on why she had to leave the NHS

“As mental health practitioners, we are pretty rubbish at putting our own mental health first. You need to put your own oxygen mask on first before putting it on to someone else.”

5 live also spoke to a group of community mental health nurses at the Leeds and York Partnership NHS Foundation Trust about how they cope with the pressure of the role.

“I think when you’re so passionate about something it’s very easy to overlook just how much you are taking on,” said Kate Ward, an occupational therapist working as a care co-ordinator in the team.

Read More: http://snip.ly/okuj8#http://www.bbc.com/news/health-41172805

Shipley Center Website Offers Prostate Cancer Facts for Patients

One in every seven men in the United States will get prostate cancer, making it the second most common type, after skin cancer, for American men. It tends to be a slow-growing disease, but can sprint to life-threatening severity if detected too late. Screening for prostate cancer can yield false-positive findings, but those most at risk for the disease—men whose father or a brother had prostate cancer, African American men, overweight men, and those in their 60s and 70s who are in good health and could expect years more of life—still should ask their doctors whether screening makes sense for them.

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The website for the Shipley Prostate Cancer Research Center provides basic information about the prostate gland and how disease affects it.

That information comes from the just-launched website of the Shipley Prostate Cancer Research Center at the School of Medicine. Created with a $10.5 million gift from BU trustee Richard Shipley (Questrom’68,’72), the center’s labs will be in the Conte Building on the Medical Campus when it opens. The center’s research will be focused on finding genomic approaches to determine which prostate cancers are aggressive and need treatment, and which can simply be monitored.

The center’s website and its Facebook page and Twitter account are up and running now, offering easy-to-follow, impartial information on practically everything anyone needs to know about prostate cancer. There’s “Prostate 101,” an overview about the prostate, information about prostate cancer and getting a second opinion, and a checklist of symptoms; information on screening; treatment options; and the state of research.

This knowledge is available to patients everywhere, “irrespective of where they choose to get their medical care or where they are in terms of testing, diagnosis, or treatment,” says site editor Gretchen Gignac, a School of Medicine associate professor of hematology and medical oncology.

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Most cases of prostate cancer are slow-growing tumors that have a very high cure rate, but some cases are fast-growing.

For its founding donor, the center is as much a beacon of information to patients as an incubator for medical research. Shipley was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2014 and chose focal laser ablation, a new and less invasive treatment than surgery and other therapies.

“The website will be unique in that it will provide up-to-date information, both on diagnostic and treatment options, in a form the layman can easily understand,” Shipley says.

Read More: http://snip.ly/olj5q#http://www.bu.edu/today/2017/shipley-center-website-offers-prostate-cancer-facts-for-patients/

Hermetic Packaging, Connectors for Medical Implant Industry

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Hermetic Implantable Packaging and Connectors for Medical Components

PA&E works with leading medical implant designers to advance integration and performance for hermetic implantable packaging and connectors in one of the most unique and critical environments known: the human body.

PA&E has created proprietary materials and encapsulations with hermetic seals that enable implantable medical devices to bypass the human body’s natural defenses and perform with greater reliability.

Precision Machining of Implantable Devices

PA&E’s unique precision machining techniques for materials and components are used to create implantable packaging and connectors for applications such as: cochlear implants, pacemakers, and other cardiac-function implants.

Here’s what PA&E can offer to medical implant designers:

Implantable Packaging and Connectors Example
PA&E’s unique brazing technologies allows materials like titanium and zirconia to be hermetically joined for applications that require an RF transparent package.

Medical Implantable Packaging — Devices implanted in the human body are at the leading edge of medical science. Advancing that technology and making more implantable medical components and devices possible requires overcoming several complex challenges. For example, medical implants must be as small as possible. However, the performance of new devices is often constrained by material selection and thickness. External communication with the implant is critical. Current communication technology relies on case material and size. Reliability and implantable viability are always issues because it is important that the body does not reject a newly-implanted device.

Read More: http://snip.ly/14fsc#http://pacaero.com/industries/medical/

Gottlieb Targets Drug Development Costs, Clinical Development Efficiencies

Posted 11 September 2017 By Zachary Brennan

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FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb on Monday explained to attendees of RAPS’ Regulatory Convergence conference some steps FDA is taking to make the clinical end of drug development more efficient and effective.

Opening with a discussion of the ways in which the gap of time between the discovery of the science behind new treatments and the adoption of such treatments has been shrinking, Gottlieb outlined a few of the ways in which the agency is modernizing its approach to collecting and evaluating clinical information.

And on a day when the discussion of how much it costs to develop a new oncology drug is being hotly debated with the release of a new study, Gottlieb also discussed how the costs of drug development “are also high, and growing.

“There’s been criticism of the various estimates of how much it costs to develop a new drug,” he said, according to the transcript of his speech. “Moreover, on a relative basis, in many cases the costs of early stage drug development has grown at a proportionally faster rate than the cost of late stage drug development. In other words, inflation in early stage drug trials is rising faster than inflation in late stage development.

“By front-loading the cost of drug discovery, the broader biomedical community is making it harder to advance new ideas. It’s economically harder to capitalize the cost of an early stage drug program, relative to funding a later stage project. So frontloading the costs are a recipe for reducing the amount of new ideas that can be advanced.”

 

Read More information: http://snip.ly/6ude0#http://www.raps.org/Regulatory-Focus/News/2017/09/11/28442/Gottlieb-Targets-Drug-Development-Costs-Clinical-Development-Efficiencies/

OSHA Proposes Extending Compliance Deadline for Crane Operator Certification Requirements to 2018

OSHA Proposes Extending

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) today issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to extend the employer’s responsibility to ensure crane operator competency and enforcement for crane operator certification to Nov. 10, 2018.

OSHA issued a final rule in September 2014, extending the deadline by three years for crane operator certification requirements in the Cranes and Derricks in Construction standard. The final rule also extended by three years the employer’s responsibility to ensure that crane operators are competent to operate a crane safely.

The agency is now proposing an extension of the enforcement date to address stakeholder concerns over the operator certification requirements in the Cranes and Derricks in Construction standard.

 

Read More: http://snip.ly/l4l6i#http://www.forconstructionpros.com/rental/lifting-equipment/crane/press-release/20974421/occupational-safety-health-administration-osha-proposes-extending-compliance-deadline-for-crane-operator-certification-requirements-to-2018

All about Microbial Control, Monitoring, Validation and Troubleshooting of Pharmaceutical Water Systems

All about Microbial Control, Monitoring, Validation and Troubleshooting of Pharmaceutical Water Systems

 

Most pharmaceutical biofilms, especially those in water systems, suffer from one major flaw: misconceptions. Strict and rigid rules for design and operations, especially when they are built on ignorance, come in the way of proper implementation of effective water systems. When myths and hype surround these systems, it is but natural that they are doomed to failure.

Those in charge of pharmaceutical biofilms, more so those who deal with water systems need to be aware of all the aspects of water systems if they have to avoid failures. Lack of it can result in costly system downtime or even product recalls. It can result in costly system downtime or even product recalls.

All about Microbial Control, Monitoring, Validation and Troubleshooting of Pharmaceutical Water Systems3

Pharmaceutical biofilms, especially those in water systems, thrive on fear and hype. No long term biofilm control can be achieved using a one-size-fits-all set of rules for design and operation. Biofilm can be controlled only when it is fully grasped. This is all the more important because each water system is unique. Water systems professionals need to get to the root of how biofilm grows into their system, which, obviously, would be quite different from any other system.

This is why those in water systems need to have proper insights into what actually lies behind some common water system designs. They need to clear the air about several misconceptions on the topic.

Solid understanding of water systems

It is to clear these myths and misconceptions that the world-acclaimed guru of water systems, Dr. Teri Soli, will be presiding over a seminar that is being organized by GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance. T.C. Soli is a Ph.D. Microbiologist and President of Soli Pharma Solutions, Inc. (www.solipharmasol.com), and since becoming a full time consultant, has served consumer products and FDA-regulated industries with training and troubleshooting expertise. He has authored the complete rewrite of USP Chapter 1231, which many consider to be USP’s “pharmaceutical water bible”.

Want to understand the ways of implementing a water system that fulfils the conditions set out by the regulatory agencies? Just log on to All about Microbial Control, Monitoring, Validation and Troubleshooting of Pharmaceutical Water Systems to enroll for this highly practical and useful seminar. This course has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

Learning on all aspects of water systems

In this microbiology-focused education about all aspects of water systems, Dr. Soli will offer knowledge of the proper design, validation, operation, monitoring, maintenance, troubleshooting, and excursion investigations of a high purity water system.

This interesting and interactive session will give participants insights into what actually lies behind some common water system designs and will bust a few myths about the same. The learning imparted at this course will is translatable to any system, with the result that uneventful microbial control can be achieved. This is the foundation to effective operation and design. Without this understanding, participants will quickly find that blind rules for operation (and design) eventually fail to work, and the consequences of failure will far outweigh the educational costs that could have prevented it.

Knowledge of water system validation and Change Control

A good way to get understanding of this topic is to be familiar with water system validation and Change Control. This knowledge is necessary to help them come up with ways of improving outcomes and reducing the frequency of excursion investigations. Dr. Soli will offer understanding on this at this seminar.

Dr. Soli has set out the following agenda for this seminar:

  • What makes water systems have microbial quality problems
  • Successful sanitization approaches for trouble-free water quality
  • Water system validation by logic instead of tradition
  • Understanding and controlling endotoxin
  • Harmonizing vs optimizing water microbial testing for system quality control
  • Microbial enumeration issues with high purity water systems
  • Water system investigation “how to’s” and example case studies
  • What USP Does and Doesn’t Say about PW, WFI, Pure Steam and Micro Issues.