What Would Happen to Health Spending Under ACA?

The growth in health care spending is expected to have slowed in 2016 and to remain slow in 2017, due to slower enrollment in government-sponsored Medicaid and a reduction in spending on prescription drugs, according to a report released Wednesday by actuaries from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

The report, published in the journal Health Affairs, assumes that President Barack Obama’s health care law, the Affordable Care Act, is still in place. Every year, the Office of the Actuary in the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services releases an analysis about how Americans are expected to spend money on health care in the years ahead. The agency will release the final outcomes on 2016 spending at the end of this year, once all the amounts have been tabulated.


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Michelle Loose, a University of Denver accelerated nursing student, checks the blood pressure for patient Elife Bzuneh, during a medical clinic night at the DAWN clinic on August 9, 2016, in Aurora, Colorado.

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The effects of the Affordable Care Act are expected to dwindle in coming years. The report finds that if the law were to continue as is then the share of the insured population would increase from 90.9 percent in 2015 to 91.5 by 2025, as more people become employed in jobs that provide them with coverage.

The slowing of health spending growth by 1.1 percent to 4.8 percent in 2016 is expected to be short-lived as the U.S. population ages, with baby boomers going onto Medicare and likely needing to use more care. Because of these factors, beginning in 2018 both Medicare and Medicaid are projected to grow faster than private insurance spending as income growth slows.

“Irrespective of any changes in law, it is expected that because of continued cost pressures associated with paying for health care, employers, insurers and other payers will continue to pursue strategies that seek to effectively manage the use and cost of health care goods and services,” Sean Keehan, the study’s first author, said in a statement.

During a press conference in Washington hosted by Health Affairs, Keehan said that “high cost-sharing is certainly one of the important factors” in driving down how much people with private plans use care, given that they have to consider how much they will shoulder costs themselves in the form of out-of-pocket spending and deductibles.

By 2025, actuaries forecast that health care’s share of the economy will reach 19.9 percent, an increase from 17.8 percent in 2025.

According to authors of the Health Affairs article, “medical price growth is projected to quicken in the coming decade compared to recent history, as both overall prices and medical-specific price inflation grow faster.”

In 2014 and 2015, health care spending had accelerated because the Affordable Care Act’s provisions went into effect: Coverage was expanded to more people and more people used health care. The federal government also chipped in more to help people pay for premiums and to pay for Medicaid for low-income Americans. Prescription drug costs also are expected to slow. In 2014 and 2015, spending surged as the drugs that were approved to treat hepatitis C, a liver disease that can require a transplant if it turns into a chronic infection, hit the market.


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Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price, center, accompanied by his wife Betty, and Vice President Mike Pence, signs an official document during a swearing in ceremony, Friday, Feb. 10, 2017, in the in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House complex in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

HHS Proposes Obamacare Rule


By 2016, these effects had slowed. Devin Stone, an economist in for CMS Office of the Actuary, said at the press conference that the projections assume that more drugs will lose their patents, slowing prescription drug costs as more generics become available.

Authors of the projections were forthcoming about the fact that the numbers are likely off target given that future of the Affordable Care Act is mired in uncertainty. Republicans and President Donald Trump have vowed to repeal the law, but lawmakers haven’t yet agreed on the timeline or ways to replace it. Decisions from lawmakers on both sides could alter factors around health spending but could also increase the number of uninsured, despite pledges or efforts not to.

Alan Weil, executive editor for Health Affairs, said the projections were still useful to help inform policy, particularly when it comes to designing ways to respond to the parts of the health care system that are driving price increases.

“This is a baseline and it’s still the law, so knowing where we are going is still important,” he said. “It’s also an important baseline to compare changes to the law. Whether we stick to the law or not, it’s important to know where we would have been.”

 

http://www.usnews.com/news/health-care-news/articles/2017-02-15/without-changes-to-obamacare-heres-what-happens-to-health-care-spending

How to build a complete Safety, Health & Environment Management System through Standards & Practices 2017

 

 

Course “How to build a complete Safety, Health & Environment Management System through Standards & Practices” has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

Overview:

A management system, by definition, is a process by which a function or functions are carried out in an organization by a series of hierarchal documents that are prescriptive, and set a particular path on which the organization manages its day-to-day operations.

A management system can be for one function, but more often than not, it incorporates many functions. Functions like accounting, engineering, banking, etc. have their own management systems, and the Safety, Health and Environmental, as well as Training and Security should have their own management system. This brings efficiency, consistency, cost effectiveness and timeliness to the entire process.

In order to work effectively, Corporate sets and creates (with business asset) input, the various standards around the functions

The SH&E, plus training and security are the functions we will build the standards and practices around. There are 16 functions that cover the SHE & TS world. We build a standard and practice around all 16 functions. Supporting documents, associated programs, procedures or standard operating procedures (SOP) will be a part of the particular function being managed. The 16 functions that will have a standard and practice specific to the function are:

  • Hazard identification & control
  • Occupational health & industrial hygiene
  • Incident management
  • Emergency preparedness
  • Environmental
  • Regulatory compliance
  • Reporting performance
  • Managing risk
  • Managing safety
  • Management security
  • Verification & audits
  • Document & record management
  • Contractor & service provider management
  • Competency management (training)
  • Commitment, communication and implementation
  • Managing change

Why should you attend :

Every organization in today’s business atmosphere, in order to be competitive and in compliance must have a comprehensive management system in place and operating smoothly. For those companies who do not understand this, the going is much harder and very much more expensive.

The standards and practices that are put in place act as the cornerstone for decisions being made relative to resources and dollars spent within the SH&E scope of business.

This process accomplishes the following:

  • Identifies the things that need to be managed within the function
  • Construct a process, tool, or mechanism that best manages each of those things identified
  • They are usually a set of standards, practices and programs that are built specifically for a particular function
  • Build the standard, practice or program so that it can be adjusted according to results
  • Build a measuring metric, benchmark or scorecard with both lagging and leading indicators
  • Build the management system in a way that is hierarchal in structure within the organization – (corporate sets and standards and the business unit builds the practice around the standard)

 

Areas Covered in the Session:

  • How to build a SH&E management system
  • How to evaluate its effectiveness
  • The tools you need in order to build a SH&E MS
  • How to implement the system with total management support
  • How to develop successful implementation plans, both with management and the workforce
  • How to tell the difference between a standard and a practice
  • How to understand how to design SH&E documents correctly
  • How to assess the risk of not having a MS process in place
  • How to roll the process out
  • How to communicate the process to those who can support the effort

 

 

Who will benefit:

  • EHS Managers, Directors, VP
  • Regulatory Managers
  • Compliance Managers
  • Production Managers, Directors, VP
  • Legal Managers
  • Quality Auditors
  • Operational Leaders (managers, directors, VP)

 

Agenda:

Lecture 1:

Process overview, Main elements of the SH&E MS, Process, infrastructure & system

Internal sources and External sources

What the regulatory agencies are looking for in a SH&E MS

Lecture 2:

System deficiencies

People, process & tools

Lecture 3:

The law perspective & risk analysis

Managing the risks through a systems approach

Lecture 4:

Non-conformance with expectations

Trending for results

Plan-Do-Check-Act

 

Day 2 Schedule

Lecture 1:

Process mapping tools

Creating the Standards & Practices (lots of examples)

Lecture 2:

Continue creating standards & practices

Lecture 3:

SH&E MS plan execution

Communicating the management system

Lecture 4:

SH&E documentation expectations

The MS review & approval process by management

Auditing the MS

How to roll it out – by stages

 

 

Speaker:

James Thatcher,

President, Global Safety Solutions, LLC,

 

James Thatcher the owner and President of Global Safety Solutions, LLC, headquartered in Divide, Colorado. Dr. Thatcher has 35 years of experience in the Oil and Gas, Metals/Minerals and Chemical industry, with management positions in engineering, operations, human resources, safety, health and environment, as well as training and security.

He has a MS in mechanical engineering, and a Ph.D. in psychology/organizational development. He has had many articles published in the Occupational Hazards Magazine, the VPP Leadership Magazine, IADC driller magazine, and through several organizations such as the National Safety Management Society and the World Safety Organization. He has presented at many seminars, summits, conferences, and association meetings for many years.

He is listed as an expert witness for operational as well as safety, health, environmental, training and security issues in the Oil and Gas industry and the mining, minerals and chemical industry. He is recognized in the Safety, Health, Environmental, Training and Security disciplines as an expert in these fields. He was the president of the National Safety Management Society for two terms, and is on their board of directors. He is closely associated with the World Safety Association, and is listed in the United Nations directory as an expert in the field of safety, health, training and security. He was the President of Technical Safety and Training Solutions, Incorporated, and consulted in the United States, Europe and South America.

I offer presentations for EHS conferences and summits, as well as for business group meetings in the area of EHS culture, values, systems, motivation, and inspiration. These messages are both timely and effective in helping to raise the bar in your EHS efforts.

 

 

 

Location: Baltimore, MD Date: April 6th & 7th, 2017 and Time: 9:00 AM to 6:00 PM

 

 

Venue: The DoubleTree Baltimore-BWI Airport

Address: The DoubleTree Baltimore-BWI Airport   890 Elkridge Landing Road – Linthicum, MD 21090

 

Price:

 

Register now and save $200. (Early Bird)

 

Price: $1,295.00 (Seminar Fee for One Delegate)

 

Until February 28, Early Bird Price: $1,295.00 From March 01 to April 04, Regular Price: $1,495.00

 

Register for 5 attendees   Price: $3,885.00 $6,475.00 You Save: $2,590.00 (40%)*

 

 

Quick Contact:

NetZealous DBA as GlobalCompliancePanel

161 Mission Falls Lane, Suite 216, Fremont,CA 94539, USA

Phone: 1-800-447-9407

Fax: 302-288-6884

Email: support@globalcompliancepanel.com

Website: http://www.globalcompliancepanel.com

Registration Link –  http://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/control/globalseminars/~product_id=900844SEMINAR?channel=mailer&camp=Seminar&AdGroup=wordpress_April_2017_SEO

 

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Article on FDA 21 CFR Part 11 Compliance

FDA-regulated industries electronic signatures and other records are considered authentic. From 2007, a strong body of opinion has emerged challenging the stringency of these requirements, but nothing major has been diluted from these.

The regulations under FDA 21 CFR Part 11 Compliance set out criteria that the Food and Drug Agency (FDA) considers in order to deem electronic signatures authentic. The electronic records, electronic signatures, and handwritten signatures executed to electronic records of several FDA 21 CFR Part 11 Compliance sets out benchmarks by which FDA-regulated industries have to be compliant with the standards set out in FDA 21 CFR Part 11 Compliance to prove that these are authentic, safe and trustworthy. The operative factor is that the FDA has to consider these signatures as being on par with those done on paper.

Which industries are included in FDA 21 CFR Part 11 Compliance?

FDA 21 CFR Part 11 Compliance applies to nearly all FDA-regulated industries, including but not restricted to:

  • Medical device manufacturers
  • Drug makers
  • CROs
  • Biotech companies, and
  • Biologics developers

The Aim of FDA 21 CFR Part 11 Compliance

The aim of FDA 21 CFR Part 11 Compliance is to ensure that specified FDA-regulated industries such as those mentioned above (with specific exceptions) implement controls -which could include audits, audit trails, documentation, system validations, and electronic signatures -for software and systems involved in processing electronic data that are:

  • Required to be maintained by the FDA predicate rules or
  • Used to demonstrate compliance to a predicate rule. The FDA describes a predicate rule as any requirement set forth in the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, the Public Health Service Act, or any FDA regulation other than Part 11. FDA 21 CFR Part 11 Compliance also applies to submissions made to the FDA in electronic format, such as a new drug application.

Which industries are exempt from FDA 21 CFR Part 11 Compliance?

Interestingly, exceptions are allowed within the same industry, based on the format of filing. For example, while FDA 21 CFR Part 11 Compliance applies to submissions made to the FDA in electronic format; it does not apply to a paper submission for the same made in electronic format, such as fax.

Also, FDA 21 CFR Part 11 compliance is not required for record retention for trace backs by food manufacturers. Similar to the logic used in the mode of filing as noted above; most food manufacturers are not otherwise explicitly required to keep detailed records, but when organizations keep electronic documentation for HACCP and similar requirements; this documentation must meet these requirements.

Learn more on this topic by visiting : http://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/control/globalseminars/~product_id=900774SEMINAR?linkedin-SEO

The Design History File (DHF), the Technical File (TF) and the Design Dossier (DD)

The Design History File (DHF), the Technical File (TF) and the Design Dossier (DD) are core regulatory documents for a medical device. This is how one can understand the central difference between them: the Design History File (along with Design Control), is the most important among the regulatory documents that the FDA requires for medical devices, while the Technical File and Design Dossier are documents that serve the same purpose, however, within the EU’s regulatory body, the Medical Device Directive (MDD). These documents constitute core regulatory requirements within these regulatory bodies.

The DHF on the one hand, and the TF and the Design Dossier on the other, have a lot of similarities as well as dissimilarities with each other. At a basic level, the major similarity between them is their intended purpose, while what they should contain is the main difference between the two.

If US medical device companies seeking to go global have to compete at a global level, they must meet an assortment of product design documentation standards. The Design Control and the Design History File (DHF) are mandated by the FDA’s CGMPs in 21 CFR 820.30, while for the EU; the core requirement is its CE-marking documentation –the Technical File or Design Dossier, as described in the MDD.

A thorough understanding of Design History File, the Technical File and the Design Dossier is necessary

All the complexities and in-depth clarification relating to these subtle matters about medical device regulatory requirements will be unraveled at a two-day seminar that is being organized by GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for the areas of regulatory compliance. John E Lincoln, who is Principal of J. E. Lincoln and Associates LLC, a consulting company and a senior Consultant in the Medical device and Regulatory Affairs areas, will be the Director at this seminar.

This seminar has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion. To register for this seminar, please log on to http://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/control/globalseminars/~product_id=900746?linkedin-SEO .

Complete knowledge of Design History File, the Technical File and the Design Dossier

At this seminar, Lincoln will examine the existing and proposed requirements for the FDA’s DHF, which includes a discussion of its derivative documents, the DMR and DHR. He will explain what the European Union’s MDD TF/DD requirements are, along with an evaluation of the documents’ differing purposes and goals, their similarities, as well as the two different device classification schemes. All important aspects relating to these areas will be taken up.

These are some of the topics Lincoln will take up for discussion:

o  Areas requiring frequent re-evaluation or update

o  Similarities and differences

o  Future trends

o  Typical DHF Table of Contents

o  Technical File or Design Dossier Table of Contents

o  The importance and usefulness of the “Essential Requirements”

o  Structure of the “Declaration of Conformity”

o  Self-declaring or Notified-Body reviewed

o  Parallel approaches to development

o  The differing approaches to file audits by the U.S. FDA and the EU Notified Body.

Useful session for companies that need to handle Design History File, the Technical File and the Design Dossier

Being a seminar aimed at helping participants understand US and global standards for medical devices; it will offer valuable assistance to all regulated companies that need to implement, review and/or modify their Device History Files, Device Master Records, Device History Records, Technical Files or Design Dossiers, documents, and activities/plan(s).

During the course of these two days, Lincoln will cover the following areas:

o  The Design Control requirements of the CGMPs, 21 CFR 820.30

o  The Design History File – documenting Product Design Control and its nine elements

o  The Device Master Record and the Device History Record

o  The EU’s Medical Device Directive

o  The “Essential Requirements”; and their documentation

o  The remaining elements of a Technical File / Design Dossier

o  Trends

o  Two attendee projects.

Preparing premarket submissions that win regulatory approval

Preparing premarket submissions that win regulatory approval is a complex task, even for the most seasoned professional in the medical devices industry. This is because of the highly stringent nature of the regulatory approval pathways, namely the Premarket Approval (PMA) process and FDA regulatory 510(k) clearance.

What makes preparing premarket submissions that win regulatory approval challenging? It is the fact, acknowledged by the FDA itself, that the PMA is the most stringent type of device marketing application required by the FDA. The PMA should be secured from the FDA before the company markets the medical device. The FDA gives its approval of the PMA for a Class II medical device only after it determines that all the elements necessary for assuring that the application has enough scientific confirmation that it is safe and effective for the intended uses it is going to be put to. Preparing premarket submissions thus is an onerous task by any stretch of imagination.

Another element of preparing premarket submissions that win regulatory approval

Another aspect of preparing premarket submissions is the 510 (k). The 510 (k) is essentially a kind of premarket submission that is made to the FDA to show that the device that a manufacturer intends to market is at least as effective and safe as a legally marketed device of its equivalence, already in the market, that is not subject to PMA. The FDA calls this principle the substantial equivalency (SE) and the device that is used as the reference for equivalence, the predicate device. The requirements governing SE are contained in 21 CFR 807.92(a) (3).

On top of all these, regulatory professionals have the responsibility of creating preparing premarket submissions that should not only convincingly demonstrate the ways of stating and explaining regulatory arguments for their device to the U.S. FDA reviewer for getting the approval; they should also be presentable and well-organized, without being cluttered or confusing.

Professional trainings for preparing premarket submissions that win regulatory approval

Given all these, it goes without saying that a completely thorough understanding and knowledge of the relevant U.S. FDA laws, regulations and requirements is absolutely necessary for regulatory professionals. This in-depth understanding can be had only from thorough training, which is indispensable if the medical device company is to win a clearance or approval.

The ways by which to do this is the core learning a two-day seminar from GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for the regulatory compliance areas, will impart. The Director of this seminar is Subhash Patel, a very senior regulatory professional and founder of New Jersey-based MD Reg Consulting LLC, which serves medical device industry clients in all aspects of global regulatory affairs specific to their needs.

To enroll for this highly valuable training session on how to successfully prepare 510(k)/Pre-IDE/IDE and PMA premarket submissions that secure clearances and approvals from the FDA, please register for this seminar by visiting http://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/control/globalseminars/~product_id=900776SEMINAR?wordpress-SEO .  This seminar has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

The grasp needed for preparing premarket submission that win regulatory approval

At this seminar, Patel will demonstrate the grasp that regulatory professionals in the medical devices industry need for working with the FDA officials during the review and approval process of their submission. He will offer a complete understanding of the major aspects of FDA premarket submissions.

While knowledge of the regulatory process is one thing; medical device companies also need to know how to set and state regulatory arguments for their device in a most convincing manner to the FDA reviewer. This knowledge will be part of this course. In the process of explaining how to prepare premarket submissions that win regulatory approval; Patel will also offer tips and suggestions to participants on how to work effectively with the U.S. FDA officials during review and approval process of their submission.

During the course of these two days, Patel will cover the following core elements of how to prepare premarket submissions. He will explain the following:

o  History and background of U.S FDA Laws and Regulations

o  Classify Your Device

o  Choose the Correct Premarket Submission for your device

o  Compile the Appropriate Information for your Premarket Submission

o  Author and Prepare your Premarket Submission

o  Submit your Premarket Submission to the FDA

o  Interact with FDA Staff during Review and Approval

o  Complete the Establishment Registration and Device Listing

http://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/DeviceRegulationandGuidance/HowtoMarketYourDevice/PremarketSubmissions/PremarketApprovalPMA/default.htm

http://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/DeviceRegulationandGuidance/HowtoMarketYourDevice/PremarketSubmissions/PremarketNotification510k/default.htm

Applied statistics for scientists and engineers

Applied statistics for scientists and engineers is necessary for a number of reasons. 21 CFR and guidance documents for the pharmaceutical, biopharmaceutical, and medical device industries specify the application of statistical methods for these functions:

o  Setting validation criteria and specifications

o  Performing Measurement Systems Analysis (MSA)

o  Conducting stability analysis

o  Using Design of Experiment (DOE) for process development and validation

o  Developing process control charts, and

o  Determining process capability indices.

Since scientists and engineers are at the heart of these functions, they need to have a thorough knowledge of how to use applied statistics. Each of these particular applications requires different and specified statistical methods. The common tools used for setting acceptance criteria and specifications are data and tolerance intervals, while for setting expiries and conducting stability analysis studies; simple linear regression and analysis-of-covariance (ANCOVA) are used.

For analyzing designed experiment for process development and validation studies, two-sample hypothesis tests, analysis-of-variance (ANOVA), regression, and ANCOVA are methods used, while for developing process control charts and developing process capability indices; descriptive statistics (distribution, summary statistics), run charts, and probability (distributions) are used.

Explaining the importance of applied statistics for scientists and engineers

A seminar that is being organized by GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for the areas of regulatory compliance, will explain the importance of applied statistics for scientists and engineers.

In the course of making the importance of applied statistics for scientists and engineers known; the Director at this seminar, Heath Rushing, who is the cofounder of Adsurgo and author of the book Design and Analysis of Experiments by Douglas Montgomery: A Supplement for using JMP, and has been an invited speaker on applicability of statistics for national and international conferences, will provide instruction on applied statistics for scientists and engineers and statistical methods for data analysis of applications related to the pharmaceutical, biopharmaceutical, and medical device industries.

To enroll for this highly valuable and practical course on applied statistics for scientists and engineers, just register by visiting http://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/control/globalseminars/~product_id=900790?wordpress_SEO .

The course “Applied Statistics for Scientists and Engineers” has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

The tools that help an understanding of applied statistics for scientists and engineers

This course on applied statistics for scientists and engineers will offer thorough instruction on how scientists and engineers need to apply the appropriate statistical approaches: descriptive statistics, data intervals, hypothesis testing, ANOVA, regression, ANCOVA, and model building. The Director will present the ways of establishing competence in each of these areas and industry-specific applications.

The application of statistical methods across the product quality lifecycle is specified in the 21 CFR and guidance documents for the pharmaceutical, biopharmaceutical, and medical device industries. There are many statistical methods that may be applied to satisfy this portion of the QSR. Yet, some commonly accepted methods can and should be used by all companies to:

o  Develop acceptance criteria

o  Ensure accurate and precise measurement systems

o  Fully characterize manufacturing processes

o  Monitor and control process results and

o  To select an appropriate number of samples.

At this seminar on applied statistics for scientists and engineers, Rushing will provide instruction on all these. He will cover the following areas over the two days of this seminar:

o  Describe and analyze the distribution of data

o  Develop summary statistics

o  Generate and analyze statistical intervals and hypothesis tests to make data-driven decisions

o  Describe the relationship between and among two or more factors or responses

o  Understand issues related to sampling and calculate appropriate sample sizes

o  Use statistical intervals to setting specifications/develop acceptance criteria

o  Use Measurement Systems Analysis (MSA) to estimate variance associated with: repeatability, intermediate precision, and reproducibility

o  Ensure your process is in (statistical) control and capable

Payroll laws are varied, hence need to be applied thoroughly and thoughtfully

 

Payroll laws set out the rules for which payroll regulations are to be enforced. Payroll laws and regulations have been enacted since it is through the payroll that employees not only get paid; it is also the same source for taxation and other deductions. Every organization that has a payroll system has to adhere to these payroll laws and regulations. The federal Department of Labor (DoL) sets out payroll laws and regulations, which the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) enforces. Payroll laws and regulations apply at the State and local levels.

Purpose of payroll laws

The fundamental function of payroll laws and regulations is to ensure that employers pay their employees the wages in accordance with the minimum wage limit set out by federal laws. Payroll laws and regulations are meant to ensure that employees do not get underpaid for their work.

The federal government makes a few deductions as part of payroll laws, while a few other kinds of deductions are levied by the States, and this rate varies from state to state. Ensuring compliance with the requisite payroll laws is an obligation on the part of employers who are bound by the provisions of the payroll laws. Employers who fail to do so invite legal action from the DoL.

In order to comply with the set payroll laws; professionals in charge of payroll functions in organizations need to have a complete and proper grasp of the way payroll laws are enacted. They need to be completely clear about the exact laws that they need to apply, the ways of doing so, the implications of not getting payroll laws right, and so on. All these will be part of a very valuable training session that GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for the regulatory compliance areas, is organizing.

At this two-day seminar, Miles Hutchinson, who is President, Sales Tax Advisors, Inc., and is a CGMA and experienced businessman, who brings over 35 years in the field, will be the Director. To register for this important learning, please visit http://www.globalcompliancepanel.com/control/globalseminars/~product_id=900838SEMINAR?wordpress_seo .

Helping with an understanding of payroll laws in their entire depth

Miles will help participants augment their learning and understand how to handle their role with confidence. He will cover a very broad range of topics that includes:

  • Worker classification
  • Employee classification
  • Establishing methods and rates of pay
  • What must be included in the rate of pay
  • Hours that must be compensated as worked time
  • Required benefits
  • De Minimus working fringes
  • Withholdings and deductions from pay
  • Voluntary deductions
  • Child support and garnishment orders
  • Payroll reporting
  • Analysis of risks of noncompliance
  • Proper documentation of policies and procedures
  • Record retention requirements.

Understanding the sources of laws and knowing how to locate them

The core of this session on payroll laws is that it will help participants understand the sources at which they can locate the laws, how to interpret them and how to apply them in the most effective ways. This learning will give the participants the skill and knowledge they need to master the laws and identify the best practices that ensure compliance from their organization and out of court. This is a big money saver for sure.

Miles will help participants who are concerned about their company’s ability to comply with U.S. labor and payroll laws with a formal study of the rules of engagement. This will help ensure that their company pays their employees fairly and handles tax and other withholdings appropriately, as mandated by law.