Supply Chain Integrity and Security

Supply Chain Integrity and Security

The topic of supply chain integrity and security is relatively new in Pharma, having gained prominence in recent years for the reasons described above. Breach of security related to criminal activity is where the issues are most visible and enforcement activity is actively taking place around the globe. In parallel, if we are looking for sustainable, root cause solutions, we must also turn our attention to supply chain integrity and deal with both security and integrity concurrently.

An Oxford on-line dictionary definition of integrity is “the state of being whole and undivided”. Over the last 40 years, the Pharma supply chain has fragmented to the point where it is a million miles from that state. There are now multiple business models, such as virtual, biotech, specialty Pharma, innovator, generics, biosimilars, etc and a divergence of supporting actors, such a contract manufacturing organizations (CMOs), contract research organizations (CROs), central laboratories, third party logistics providers, pre-wholesalers, wholesalers, specialty pharmaceutical providers (SPPs) etc. As a result, our supply chains have dis-integrated to the point where visibility and accountability have become blurred at the edges – and it is this disintegration that has opened the doors to criminal activity and errors in quality outcomes.

The solution is not an easy one. It requires urgent action to mitigate activities of the ‘bad guys’, together with a longer term approach to ensure the ‘good guys’ get better at building and managing robust supply chains. This can only be achieved by collaboration between regulators, other enforcement agencies, technology providers and the industry itself. Where do we start?

We must initially focus on the end-to-end supply chain in its current state. Chains of custody and ownership must be clearly identified and remediation actions agreed by responsible parties to plug the gaps that currently exist. For example, Quality and technical agreements must become far more ‘process’ orientated so that they become working documents shared between business partners, rather than merely a static list of tick boxes. Change control has to work on upstream and downstream impacts that might affect supply chain integrity and procurement must forge supply agreements that impose obligations for supply chain visibility on prospective partners. This and much more needs to happen and will be discussed in the session.

Then we must turn attention to the building of supply chains for the future – the product development phase. This industry is unique in that the entire supply chain must be registered with competent authorities before approval to sell and post-launch changes have to be approved. This places a great responsibility on getting it right from the start. This is where the opportunity lay for sustainable improvements in the physical architecture of the supply chain and the underpinning management processes and information flows. A foundation for this has already been put in place by the regulators through FDA’s 21st Century Modernization initiative and ICH Q8 – 11 guidelines. The key to translating these initiatives into meaningful supply chain improvements, however, it in understanding the patient value proposition and the organizational/cultural elements that must firstly be in place, and these are explored in some depth.

Why should you attend: The Pharmaceutical supply chain has never been in such turmoil and under such attack from governments and regulators globally. The evidence is stark and mounting. Supply chain shortages in the US have moved even the President to demand urgent remediation; high level congressional committees have also asked searching questions of FDA and other involved stakeholders, in an attempt to discover what has been going on with high profile supply chain failures. Cargo theft, diversion and counterfeiting have become almost endemic, with detection and enforcement efforts stretched to the limit. Finally, and possibly most worrying of all, are the cases where materials have been adulterated or substituted with toxic alternatives (for economic gain) and have progressed undetected through one or more stages in the supply chain causing eventual patient death.

Areas Covered in the Session:

  • How to organize for supply chain integrity throughout the product life cycle
  • Current approaches to clamping down on criminal activity in the supply chain
  • Issues causing greatest concern to regulators and how to address them
  • Role of ICH Q8 – 11 in building robust supply chains
  • How the disciplines of procurement and supply chain management (SCM) can be leveraged
  • Role of technology as an enabler

Who Will Benefit:

  • Research chemistry and biochemistry
  • Chemical and biochemical engineering
  • Chemistry, manufacturing, and controls
  • Preclinical Development
  • Clinical Development
  • Regulatory Affairs
  • Quality Assurance

Speaker Profile

Hedley Rees is a practicing consultant, coach and trainer, helping healthcare companies build, manage and continuously improve their clinical trial and commercial supply chains and risk profiles. He has his own company, Biotech PharmaFlow Ltd, based in the UK and handles assignments across the spectrum from top ten Pharma’s through to highly virtual early stage start ups. Prior to this, Hedley held senior supply chain positions at Bayer, British Biotech, Vernalis, Johnson & Johnson and OSI Pharmaceuticals. His skill set covers the range of supply chain management processes from strategic procurement, production and inventory control, distribution logistics, information systems and improvement. His specific interest is in driving industry improvements through the regulatory modernization frameworks of FDAs 21st Century Modernization and ICH Q8 – Q10.

Hedley holds an Executive MBA from Cranfield University School of Management and is a corporate member of the Chartered Institute of Purchasing and Supply (MCIPS). He is a member of the UK BioIndustry Association’s (BIA) Manufacturing Advisory Committee and also regularly speaks at international conferences, being co-chair of the 2011 FDA/Xavier University sponsored Global Outsourcing Conference in Cincinnati, October 2 -5. He has published in US and EU pharmaceutical journals and is author of “Supply Chain Management in the Drug Industry: Delivering Patient Value for Pharmaceuticals and Biologics” published by J. Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, New Jersey.

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Drug Development Process – From Discovery to Marketing

Drug Development Process - From Discovery to Marketing

Overview:

This webinar will provide a clinical and regulatory perspectives on requirements to take a new drug from research to market.

We will begin by reviewing the contents of an Investigational New Drug (IND) application, and then follow the process of an IND submission. Next, the contents and approval process of an NDA submission will be discussed. This seminar will also provide a foundation for those who require an understanding of the FDA new drug approval process, and familiarize the attendees with the regulatory landscape in which INDs and NDAs are developed and approved.

Areas Covered in the Session:

  • High level overview of the FDA approval process for a new drug
  • What is an IND? Identify the key contents of an IND
  • What is an NDA? Identify the contents of an NDA
  • The FDA IND and NDA review process
  • Discovery stage
  • Preclinical Testing
  • IND Application
  • Clinical Trials
  • Phases I to IV
  • NDA
  • High-level description of medical device process

Who Will Benefit:

  • CRAs
  • CRCs
  • Nurses
  • Clinical Trials Associates
  • Regulatory Affairs

Speaker Profile

Fatuga is a social-entrepreneur who is actively engaged in three primary roles/companies: (a) founder/president of Caligeo Clinical OneVision; (b) founder/CEO of Caligeo Clinical CRO; and (c) founder/Executive Director of Atlanta Premier SMO. His professional passion lies in promoting clinical trial opportunities in emerging markets (especially in Africa, the Caribbean, East Asia, and Latin America) and among under-represented population (in the USA). He recently completed his MBA degree from Emory University/Goizueta Business School with a focus on Entrepreneurial ship/Organizational Behavior & Management. He received his M.Sc. in Drug Regulatory Affairs and Health Policies from Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences and BS degree in Neuroscience from Brown University. He has more than 15 years of experience in the clinical research industry. Fatuga began his clinical research career as a study coordinator at Brown University. Since then, he has had leadership opportunities as Clinical Team Manager, Project Lead, QA/QC Manager, Lead CRA, CRA Consultant, Medical Research Associate, and CRA Specialist in a variety of companies such as central imaging facility, Contract Research Organizations (CROs), biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies. Fatuga is currently certified as a Project Management Professional (PMP) and a Clinical Research Associate (CCRA). He is an active member of the International GCP Training Advisory Board for the Association of Good Clinical Practices in Nigeria (AGCPN) and also a member of Nigerian Association of Pharmacist and Pharmaceutical Scientists in the Americas (NAPPSA). Fatuga is also a member of the International Committee/Leadership Team of the National Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical Association (NBPA) which is a US based organization functioning in collaborative efforts to discuss challenges and opportunities of conducting clinical trials with diverse communities as well as addressing the disparity issues in the clinical trial industry.

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What are the FDA’s Process Validation requirements?

Process Validation (PV), according to the FDA, is collecting and assessing data right from the design stage till the production stage. PV is set out for all the stages of production for a product in the FDA-regulated industries. The core purpose of PV is to establish scientific proof that any process being employed has the capability of delivering quality products consistently.

The FDA’s process validation requirements are set out in its general principles of Process Validation. Starting from 1987, the FDA has been issuing guidelines at intervals to state, improve and strengthen the general principles of Process Validation. In almost a quarter century of the first guideline, the revision of January 2011 came into being. This guideline is considered a landmark and a guide for PV professionals since it reworked extensively and expanded the general principles on process validation. It is the current guideline from the FDA on Process Validation requirements.

These are what the FDA’s 2011 guideline on general principles on Process Validation propagate:

  • Incorporation of the principles of sound science
  • Taking steps to assess and mitigate risk
  • Bringing about improvements in every stage of the process
  • Adapting the science-based principles of contemporary manufacturing
  • Fostering and encouraging innovation

The centrality of control to process validation

Process validation is tied to the product lifecycle approach by the FDA general principles on process validation of 2011. The central purpose of process validation is to ensure that the process is in a state of control at all stages of production.

The following points illustrate the reason for which the FDA expects its PV requirements to be met:

  • Being a process that is ongoing and continuous, PV begins at the earliest stages of production and goes on till the product’s lifecycle is completed
  • Those in charge of commercial production should have deep and intimate knowledge of the workings of PV principles
  • Only this knowledge helps PV professional locate the sources of variability and address them
  • Only PV into which risk management is built frees errors from the product

The three stages of PV

The FDA stipulates three layers or stages on which its general principles of Process Validation are built:

  • Process design: The stage in which the knowledge gained helps the commercial process define the process development activities
  • Process qualification: The stage where PV guarantees that the process design has the capability for being reproduced at industrial level
  • Continued Process Validation: The most important stage PV in that this is where the element of control into the routine production process is introduced and built; Continued Process Validation takes under its ambit all activities such as continuous verification, maintenance, and process improvement. Information is collected and monitored during commercialization to assess the Continued Process Validation stage.

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Seminar

Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation

Course “Applied Statistics for FDA Process Validation” has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

In Guidance for Industry Process Validation: General Principle and Practices, process validation is defined as, “”…the collection and evaluation of data, from the process design stage through commercial production..” The guidance further delineates the ‘process design stage through commercial production’ into three distinct stages of the product lifecycle:

Stage 1: Process Design: The commercial manufacturing process is defined during this stage based on knowledge gained through development and scale-up activities.

Stage 2: Process Qualification: During this stage, the process design is evaluated to determine if the process is capable of reproducible commercial manufacturing.

Stage 3: Continued Process Verification: Ongoing assurance is gained during routine production that the process remains in a state of control.

The first stage of process validation is process design. The Process Validation guidance document states, “A successful validation program depends on information and knowledge from product and process development. This knowledge and understanding is the basis for establishing an approach to control of a manufacturing process that results in products with desired quality attributes:

Manufactures should:

  • Understand the sources of variation
  • Detect the presence and degree of variation
  • Understand the impact of variation on the process and ultimately on product attributes
  • Control the variation in a manner commensurate with the risk it represents to the process and product.”

The second stage of process validation is process qualification. Although stage 2 has two elements, this course will focus on recommendations for the second element, PPQ. PPQ “combines the actual facility, utilities, equipment (each now qualified), and the trained personnel with the commercial manufacturing process, control procedures, and components to produce commercial batches.” Additionally, the process validation guidance document that “Each manufacturer should judge whether it has gained sufficient understanding to provide a high degree of assurance in its manufacturing process to justify commercial distribution of the product. Focusing exclusively on qualification efforts without understanding the manufacturing process and associated variations may not lead to adequate assurance of quality.”

The third stage of process validation is continued process verification. The process validation guidance document defines the need for this stage: “After establishing and confirming the process, manufacturers must maintain the process in a state of control over the life of the process, even as materials, equipment, production environment, personnel, and manufacturing procedures change.” Manufacturers should use ongoing programs to collect and analyze product and process data to evaluate the state of control of the process. These programs may identify process or product problems or opportunities for process improvements that can be evaluated and implemented through some of the activities described in Stages 1 and 2.”

This course focuses on how to establish a systematic approach to implementing statistical methodologies into a process validation program consistent with the FDA guidance. It begins with a primer on statistics, focusing on methods that will be applied in each remaining chapter. Next, it teaches the application of statistics for setting specifications and assessing measurement systems (assays), two foundational requirements for process validation. Lastly, the course applies statistic through the three stages of process validation defined by requirements in the process validation regulatory guidance documents. Methods taught through all three stages are recommended by regulatory guidance documents; references to the specific citations in the guidance documents are provided.


Why you should attend:

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) provided a guidance for industry in 2011 that has established a framework for process validation in the pharmaceutical industry. This guidance, titled “Process Validation: General Principles and Practices” consists of a three-stage process. The three stages are 1) Process Design, 2) Process Qualification, and 3) Continued Process Verification.

This course focuses on how to establish a systematic approach to implementing statistical methodologies into a process development and validation program consistent with the FDA guidance. This course teaches the application of statistics for setting specifications, assessing measurement systems (assays), using design of experiments (DOE), developing a control plan as part of a risk management strategy, and ensuring process control/capability. All concepts are taught within the three-stage product cycle framework defined by requirements in the process validation regulatory guidance documents.

Although established for the pharmaceutical industry, it also provides a useful framework for other industries.

Analyses in this course use the point-and-click interface of JMP software by SAS.


Areas Covered in the Session

  • apply statistics to set specifications and validate measurement systems (assays)
  • develop appropriate sample plans based on confidence and power
  • implement suitable statistical methods into a process validation program for each of the three stages
  • Stage 1, Process Design: utilize risk management tools to identify and prioritize potential critical process parameters; and define critical process parameters and operating spaces for the commercial manufacturing process using design of experiments (DOE)
  • Stage 2, Process Qualification: assess scale effects while incorporating large (pilot and/or commercial) scale data; develop process performance qualification (PPQ) acceptance criteria by characterizing intra and inter-batch variability using process design data and batch homogeneity studies; and develop an appropriate sampling plan for PPQ
  • Stage 3, Continued Process Verification: develop a control plan as part of a risk management strategy; collect and analyze product and process data; and ensure your process is in (statistical) control and capable.

Who Will Benefit:

This seminar is designed for pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical professionals who are involved with product and/or process design, validation, or manufacturing/control.

  • Process Scientist/Engineer
  • Design Engineer
  • Product Development Engineer
  • Regulatory/Compliance Professional
  • Design Controls Engineer
  • Six Sigma Green Belt
  • Six Sigma Black Belt
  • Continuous Improvement Manager

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Tougher Import Rules for FDA Imports in 2019

Course “Tougher Import Rules for FDA Imports in 2019” has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

Background:

FDA and the Customs and Border Patrol Service (CBP) have become increasingly sophisticated and equally demanding in the submission of import information and adherence to government procedures. Firms that fail to understand and properly execute an import and export program find their shipments delayed, detained or refused. As of December 2016, FDA and CBP officially implemented the Automated Commercial Environment (ACE) entry filing system. You either meet ACE requirements or face entry refusals and monetary penalties of up to $10,000 per offense. Other factors can derail the expectation of a seamless import entry process. The course covers detailed information about the roles and responsibilities of the various parties involved with an import operation and how to correct the weakest link(s) in the commercial chain. The course will include tips on how to understand FDA’s thinking, negotiate with the FDA and offer anecdotal examples of FDA’s import program curiosities.


Why you should attend

What happens when your product is detained? FDA will begin a legal process that can become an expensive business debacle. You must respond fully within short timeframes. This is not the time for you to be on a learning curve. You need to have a plan in place and know what you are doing.

The FDA is steadily increasing the legal and prior notice information requirements. If you do not know what those requirements are and you initiate a shipment, your product is figuratively dead in the water. You must be accurate with the import coding information and understand the automated and human review process. If not, you can expect detained shipments. CBP is implemented a new “Automated Commercial Environment” computer program that changes import logistics and information reporting for FDA regulated products. Your shipment may be stopped before it is even loaded at the foreign port.

When products are refused, you have different options. Some options may cost more than others. For example, your product can be seized and destroyed by the government. You may be fined if you do not act in a timely manner. These are common problems that become prohibitively expensive. You should know how to avoid common problems or at least how to mitigate the cost by using established and effective business planning.

Learn how to deal with common problems, such as returns for repair, importing QC samples, and investigational products

On a positive note, the FDA is implementing the Voluntary Qualification Importer Program under the FDA Food Safety and Modernization Act. One other perk is that FDA offers export certificates, for a modest fee, which may give you a competitive advantage in foreign markets. In some cases, a FDA export certificate is required by foreign governments. Finally, the new EU Medical Device Regulation will change how FDA manages foreign inspections and in your favor.

Who Will Benefit:

  • Domestic importers
  • Foreign exporter
  • Initial importers
  • International trade executives
  • Venture Capitalists
  • Marine insurance underwriters
  • Import Brokers
  • Regulatory affairs managers
  • Import / Export consultants
  • In-house counsel
  • Contract specialists
  • Logistics managers
  • Third party establishment inspection entities
  • Sales managers
  • Investors

Day 1 Schedule


Lecture 1:

FDA Legal Authority Customs and Border Control (CBP) Import Process FDA Import Process Registration and documentation


Lecture 2:

FDA Import Process (continued)

  • Import Brokers
  • Prior Notice Information
  • CBP and FDA computer programs
  • Import Codes
  • Bonds and Bonded Warehouses
  • FDA “Notice of Action”

Lecture 3:

Import Delays Import Alerts Detention Refusals

Day 2 Schedule


Lecture 1:

Foreign Inspections FDA 483 – Inspectional Observations


Lecture 2:

FDA Warning Letters and Automatic detention


Lecture 3:

Import Hypothetical FDA Import for Export Program FDA Export Program Export Hypothetical


Lecture 4:

FDA Export Program Special Import Issues

  • Trade Shows
  • Personal Use
  • Compassionate Use

Casper Uldriks

ex-FDA Expert and former Associate Center Director of CDRH

Casper (Cap) Uldriks owns Encore Insight LLC, which provides consulting services on FDA Law. He brings over 32 years of experience from the FDA. He specialized in the FDA’s medical device program as a field investigator, served as a senior manager in the Office of Compliance and as an Associate Center Director for the Center for Devices and Radiological Health. He developed enforcement actions and participated in the implementation of new statutory requirements. He is recognized as an exceptional and energetic speaker. His comments are candid, straightforward and of practical value. He understands how FDA thinks, operates and where it is headed.

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Seminar on HIPAA 2019 | HIPAA Security Risk Assessment | What’s new?

Description:

This two-day seminar will get into the fine details of what we need to do and how to do it.

We will go point by point through the entire HIPAA Security Rule and uncover simple methods to comply and create policy.

The primary goal is to ensure everyone is well educated on what is myth and what is reality with this law, there is so much misleading information all over regarding the do’s and don’ts with HIPAA – I want to add clarity for compliance officers

It will also address major changes under the Omnibus Rule and any other applicable updates for 2018.

Why you Should attend:

Join me in this two day seminar to explore what’s new with HIPAA both from a regulation standpoint (new requirements) and an enforcement standpoint

Omnibus has changed the HIPAA landscape for good!

Do you know all of the requirements of this enigmatic law?

Are you abiding by them?

My goal is to make this extremely complex enigma known as “HIPAA” very easy to understand with a painless step by step approach to an otherwise harrowing task… Times have changed and new laws are now in place concerning protected health information. The best way to protect your practice or business and save yourself future headaches and possible litigation or Federal fines is to be proactive instead of reactive

This once rarely enforced law has changed and you need to know what’s going on!

Protect your practice or business!

 

Areas Covered in the Session:

Study all 18 Standards and 44 Implementation Specifications of the regulations

Updates for 2019

Requirements of Compliance Officers

New definition of what constitutes protected health information

Real life litigated cases

BYOD

Portable devices

Business associates and the increased burden

Emailing of PHI

Texting of PHI

Federal Audit Process

HIPAA and suing – how this works

Risk Assessment

Who Will Benefit:

Practice managers

Any business associates who work with medical practices or hospitals (i.e. billing companies, transcription companies, IT companies, answering services, home health, coders, attorneys, etc)

MD’s and other medical professionals

Agenda:

Day 1 Schedule

Lecture 1:

HIPAA a Brief History

Lecture 2:

HIPAA Privacy vs Security

Lecture 3:

New definition of what constitutes protected health information

Lecture 4:

HIPAA and the Business Associate

Lecture 5:

Through examination of all 18 Standards and 44 Implementation Specifications of the HIPAA Security Rule and how to apply them

Lecture 6:

How to enforce policy for each standard and implementation specification

Lecture 7:

HIPAA and litigation

Day 2 Schedule

Lecture 1:

The Federal Audit Process and things to be ready for

Lecture 2:

HIPAA and Suing – how this works and examples of real cases

Lecture 3:

Technology and HIPAA – best practices and big “no-no’s”

Lecture 4:

Ransomware, Viruses, bad technology

Lecture 5:

HIPAA Texting and Emailing – myth vs reality

Lecture 6:

Personal Devices and HIPAA

Lecture 7:

HIPAA and the Audit Process

Lecture 8:

How to conduct a HIPAA Security Risk Assessment

Speaker:

Brian L Tuttle

ex-FDA Expert and former Associate Center Director of CDRH

Brian L Tuttle is a Certified Professional in Health IT (CPHIT), Certified HIPAA Professional (CHP), Certified HIPAA Administrator (CHA), Certified Business Resilience Auditor (CBRA), Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) with over 18 years’ experience in Health IT and Compliance Consulting.

With vast experience in health IT systems (i.e. practice management, EHR systems, imaging, transcription, medical messaging, etc.) as well as over 18 years’ experience in standard Health IT with multiple certifications and hands-on knowledge, Brian serves as compliance consultant and has conducted onsite and remote risk assessments for over 1000 medical practices, hospitals, health departments, insurance plans, and business associates throughout the United States.

Location: Miami, FL Date: April 18th & 19th, 2019 and Time: 9:00 AM to 6:00 PM

Venue:  Hyatt Place Miami Airport East, 3549 NW 42nd Ave, Miami, FL 33142, USA

Price:

1 ATTENDEE $2,000, Register for 1 attendee

5 ATTENDEES $10,000, Register for 5 attendees

10 ATTENDEES $20,000, Register for 10 attendees

Until March 10, Early Bird Price: $2,000.00, From March 11 to April 16, Regular Price: $2,200.00

Sponsorship Program benefits for seminar

For More Information

Contact us today!

NetZealous LLC DBA GlobalCompliancePanel

globalcompliancepanel@gmail.com

Toll free: +1-800-447-9407

Phone: +1-510-584-9661

Website:

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Virtual Seminar on HIPAA Training for Compliance Officer

This 6-hour seminar will be addressing how practice/business managers (or compliance offers) need to get their HIPAA house in order before the imminent audits occur. It will also address major changes under the Omnibus Rule and any other applicable updates for 2018.

Areas also covered will be texting, email, encryption, medical messaging, voice data and risk factors as they relate to IT.

The primary goal is to ensure everyone is well educated on what is myth and what is reality with this law, there is so much misleading information regarding the do’s and don’ts with HIPAA -I want to add clarity for compliance officers and what you guys need to do and how to best implement your HIPAA program based on over 18 years of personal experience working with Federal auditors, state auditors, and corporate auditors.

We will go through multiple scenarios that are commonly faced by compliance officers and how to manage these situations

I will also speak to real life litigated cases I have worked where HIPAA is being used to justify state cases of negligence -THIS IS BECOMING A HUGE RISK!

In addition, this course will cover the highest risk factors for being sued as well as being audited (these two items tend to go hand in hand).

Why you should attend

Join me in this in depth 6-hour seminar where we will get into the nitty-gritty about the roles and responsibilities of a HIPAA Compliance Officer.

Do you have an affective HIPAA compliance program? Do you know what needs to be done to satisfy the requirements?

New laws, funding, and enforcement mean increased risk for both business associates and covered entities – 2017 was a record year for enforcement and fines – 2018 will be no different.

HIPAA Omnibus – Do you know what’s involved and what you need to do?

What does Omnibus mean for covered entities and business associates?

Why should you be concerned?

Court cases that are changing the landscape of HIPAA and patient’s ability to sue!

TRIAL ATTORNEYS ARE MORE DANGEROUS THAN THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT!!

It is important to understand the new changes going on at Health and Human Services as it relates to enforcement of HIPAA for both covered entities and business associates. You need to know how to avoid being low hanging fruit in terms of audit risk as well as being sued by individuals who have had their PHI wrongfully discloses due to bad IT or internal administrative practices.

Who Will Benefit

  • Practice Managers
  • Any Business Associates who work with medical practices or hospitals (i.e. billing companies, transcription companies, IT companies, answering services, home health, coders, attorneys, etc)
  • MD’s and other medical Professionals

Agenda

  • Updates for 2019
  • Requirements of Compliance Officers
  • New definition of what constitutes protected health information
  • Real life litigated cases
  • BYOD
  • Portable Devices
  • Business associates and the increased burden
  • Emailing of PHI
  • Texting of PHI
  • Federal Audit Process
  • HIPAA and suing – how this works
  • Risk Assessment
  • Ransomware and how to avoid
  • What to do when a breach occurs
  • Best Resources

Speaker Profile

Brian L Tuttle, CPHIT, CHP, CBRA, Net+, A+, CCNA, MCP is a Certified Professional in Health IT (CPHIT), Certified HIPAA Professional (CHP), Certified Business Resilience Auditor (CBRA) with over 15 years’ experience in Health IT and Compliance Consulting. Mr. Tuttle has worked all of those 15 years with MAG Mutual Healthcare Solutions and is now Senior Compliance Consultant and IT Manager with InGauge Healthcare Solutions (previously named MAG Mutual Healthcare Solutions). Almost all of Brian’s clients are earned by referral with little or no advertising. Brian is well known and highly regarded in medical circles throughout the United States .

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