Validation the complies with ICH guidelines

A clear and perceptive insight into how to understand and interpret statistical concepts used to investigate quantitative ICH Guidelines such as analytical methods validation, procedures, and acceptance criteria in calibration limits is required from professionals in the field of statistical analysis. They also need to have a proper understanding of process and quality controls, as well as ICH Q8 and Q9.

The guideline the ICH has set out for analytical methods validation is the ICH tripartite-harmonized ICH Guideline on Text, which was previously coded as Q2A, finalized in October 1994 under Step 4. This guideline seeks to identify the validation parameters that are required for a number of analytical methods. The characteristics and parameters that need to be taken into consideration when validating the analytical procedures that are included in the registration applications are also laid down in this guideline.

When it comes to procedures and acceptance criteria in calibration limits, the ICH guideline is the ICH tripartite-harmonized ICH Guideline on Methodology, which used to be previously coded as Q2B. This was finalized in November 1996 under Step 4. This guideline extends the ICH guideline on Text, or what is called Q2A (mentioned above) to comprise the actual experimental data required, along with the statistical interpretation, for the validation of a variety of analytical procedures.

Current Step 4 for process and Quality Control

The current guideline for process and Quality Control is the Current Step 4 version of the ICH-harmonized Tripartite Guideline. The final draft of this guideline has been recommended for adoption to the regulatory bodies of the three biggest pharmaceutical markets in the world, namely the US, the EU and Japan.

Meeting critical milestones is required for professionals who want to achieve harmonization in Quality, professionals. Conducting stability studies, the way the studies define relevant limits for the testing of impurities, and following a more malleable approach to pharmaceutical quality that is based on the principles of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) risk management are among these milestones. ICH’s Quality guidelines on harmonization relating to Quality cover the following areas:

o  Stability

o  Analytical Validation

o  Impurities

o  Pharmacopoeias

o  Quality of Biotechnological Products

o  Specifications

o  Good Manufacturing Practice

o  Pharmaceutical Development

o  Quality Risk Management

o  Pharmaceutical Quality System

o  Development and Manufacture of Drug Substances

o  Lifecycle Management.

A thorough training session on the areas of Validation in accordance with ICH guidelines

It is important and necessary for professionals in this area to get proper guidance, considering the complexity and the breadth of the issues associated with these techniques, which cover both the pharmaceutical and clinical applications, and considering that these techniques apply to a number of area such as stability testing, outlier analysis and risk management.

A seminar from GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for the areas of regulatory compliance, will offer this learning. Dr. Alfred Bartolucci, who serves as Emeritus Professor of Biostatistics at the University of Alabama, will be the Director of this seminar. Please visit Validation the complies with ICH guidelinesto register for this valuable learning session. This seminar has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

A clear and deep understanding of statistical concepts

Dr. Bartolucci will offer in-depth and clear learning of the statistical concepts used for investigating quantitative ICH Guidelines such as analytical methods validation, procedures and acceptance criteria in calibration limits, and process and Quality Control, as well as with ICH Q8 and Q9.

Although not a course in statistics, this seminar will offer an applied approach to the statistical techniques used and will show how to reasonably interpret them. Participants can use this learning to address the various challenges facing pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies when they have to quantify results in a meaningful interpretable manner through tabulations and graphical presentations.

Another area of importance at this seminar is the expectations of different regulatory agencies regarding the quantification and development of a sound statistical monitoring of a properly utilized, effective, and efficient process control. It will familiarize the participants with the critical aspects of the statistical methods and explain to them the practical application of these guidelines.

Four years of the EU’s Cosmetics Product Regulation

It has been four years since the EU’s Cosmetics Product Regulation (Regulation EC No. 1223/2009), initiated in December 2009, became operational in July 2013. This regulation was considered path breaking when it was introduced because of its comprehensive nature as well as the extent of the shift it signaled from the legislation from which it took off. It was also considered extremely significant because it suggested a regulatory framework that was in alignment with the most modern technologies and methods available during the present times.

Some of the regulatory modules which are structured into the EU’s Cosmetics Product Regulation include important elements aimed at ensuring safety of cosmetic products and accountability from manufacturers, and include points such as:

o  Cosmetic Product Safety Report (CPSR)

o  Product Information File (PIF)

o  Responsible Person (RP)

o  Label information

o  Cosmetovigilance

o  Substance regulations

o  Claims, etc.

Compliance with the safety regulations set out in EU’s Cosmetics Product Regulation is mandatory. This, though, is not easy, considering the severe clauses that the regulation has for ensuring compliance. These are the reasons for which compliance with the EU’s Cosmetics Product Regulation is challenging:

–       In-market control is assigned to EU Member State competent authorities

–       The flow of information between countries is interlinked by the Cosmetic Product Notification Portal (CPNP), which is fed with the information by the demand for pre-market notification of cosmetic products and by ongoing cosmetovigilance procedures put in place with the respective provisions in the CPR

–       The central role in cosmetovigilance applies to the Responsible Person while the access to manufacturers and responsible persons is assured by product labeling provisions

–       EU and non-EU manufactures of cosmetics as well, as the suppliers of cosmetic ingredients, are required to provide data on their chemicals

–       Compliance with the modules requires know-how, diligence and ongoing adjustment to state of the art of knowledge and documentation.

More challenges

In addition, the EU’s Cosmetics Product Regulation presents more challenges for manufacturers of cosmetic products that want to market to any of the countries of the EU:

The EU’s Cosmetics Product Regulation is so expansive that it represents not only the entry requirements for marketing of cosmetics product in the European Union; but is a model framework for many national legislations worldwide. These legislators are given the choice of either adopting a few parts of the EU’s Cosmetics Product Regulation’s modules, or the structure of the Regulation of its predecessor legislation, the Cosmetics Directive, in full. Therefore, companies need to have the knowledge and the skills needed for complying both with the EU’s Cosmetics Product Regulation and other regulatory frameworks.

There is yet another challenge to implementing the EU’s Cosmetics Product Regulation: The safety assessment. Complying with this part of the EU’s Cosmetics Product Regulation requires extensive knowledge and skill of a host of subjects and issues such as toxicology, chemistry, cosmetology and microbiology, apart from that of regulatory affairs and compliance management. This already tough provision has been made even tougher with the final implementation of the ban on animal testing that the EU introduced in March 2013,

As a result of this ban, considerable confusion abounds about the interpretation of the compliance regulations in the various agencies and sectors that the compliance process has to pass through. If alternative tests are carried out, they are not available for all toxicological endpoints that need assessment as part of the EU’s Cosmetics Product Regulation.

Clearing the confusions

This makes compliance with the EU’s Cosmetics Product Regulation as difficult and complicated as one can imagine. A two-day seminar from GlobalCompliancePanel, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance, will offer clarity on the provisions of the EU’s Cosmetics Product Regulation. The complicated parts of the regulation, namely the regulatory modules, will be given a clearer understanding.

The Director of this two-day seminar is Dr. Annelie Struessmann, who is the Technical & Regulatory Director with CONUSBAT Regulatory Services, a provider of internationalization compliance services for Cosmetics, Personal Care, Fine Chemicals and Borderline Industries.

To gain better understanding of this regulation, please visit Four years of the EU’s Cosmetics Product Regulation to enroll. This seminar has been pre-approved by RAPS as eligible for up to 12 credits towards a participant’s RAC recertification upon full completion.

At this session, Dr. Struessmann will explain the provisions of the regulatory modules and supplement this with a description of the latest developments and research results. She will use these to show pathways towards compliance, at which she will use practical examples and experiences gained in the course of performing the necessary compliance steps before and while marketing of cosmetics products in the EU.