Is your organization a part of the food chain?

The exploding and irreversible pace of globalization has brought in its wake changes in almost all areas of human activity. Goods and commodities that were once confined to one’s local area have now started reaching out to the unlikeliest corners of the world. One of the most active and important of such items to undergo a sea change in the way it is produced and consumed is food.

What we need every few hours, and was available and restricted to local use has now smashed boundaries. Finding a Mexican restaurant in Japan or a Chinese one in Canada is common. At the base of such drastic change in the food supply chain is the need for hygiene standards.

 

A single standard for global food?

In the last couple of decades or so since the phenomenal and hitherto unseen way in which the countries and markets of the world are getting closer to each other; the need for a uniform, global standard that regulates food standards has become a critical need. Again, this is a little problematic, because food, as we know, is very varied. It is as heterogeneous as mankind. So, is having a single Standard going to make sense?

It may not, but this does not obviate the need for a pan-food supply chain, global Standard for food safety. In fact, its need is greater than ever before now, with the changed times, when the boundaries of food movement have thinned down like never before. It is with the intention of standardizing standards across the food supply chain that ISO 22000 was born.

Certification

ISO left it to The Foundation for Food Safety Certification to establish strict systems for the effective implementation and rigorous auditing and maintenance of the standard combination. It is supported by the Confederation of the Food and Drink Industries of the European Union.

Being a certification scheme, The Food Safety System Certification 22000 or FSSC 22000 comprises ISO 22000 and ISO/TS 22002-1. It sets out a number of impartial Standards for manufacturers and others in the food supply chain to ensure quality standards. At its core, it insists on the PDCA (Plan, Do, Check, Act) methodology for the food supply chain. ISO 22000:2005 sets out the requirements for a food safety management system where any organization that is part of the food chain has to demonstrate its ability to control food safety hazards. This is to make sure that food is safe at the time it is being consumed by humans.  It applies to primary producers, processors, manufacturers, food and related service providers, and product suppliers.

References:

http://www.iso.org/iso/catalogue_detail?csnumber=35466

http://www.praxiom.com/iso-22000-intro.htm

http://arcms.ie/home/health-and-safety-systems/iso-22000-food-safety-management-system/

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